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Elephind.com contains 185,322 items from Prairie Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DEEP PLOWING . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

DEEP PLOWING . Wo intended to have called attention to this subject -before now , but it has been crowded off by other matter . There is perhaps no ono thing that is so Universally operating to depress bur agriculture —to decrease tho average rttto of crops Us continued shallow plowin -. Both reason and fact conspire to condemn this course . The roots of grass , com ,-wheat , or any ojher plant / soon exliaust the fertility of the thin stratum of soil annually stirred ; and light crops are tho consequence . By deeper plowing , new earth is exposed to tho action of the air and rendered fertile ; and hence a sure way of renovating lands that have always been shallow plowed , and thus reduced , is to plow deeper , the relative agencies of soil and atmosphere in the growth of p lants are not yet determined ; but that tho atmosphere lias an agency in it which is all-important , has been determined . Earth may be dug from the bottom of . a well , which may not contain a particle of the so...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
HOUSEHOLD- AFFAIRS [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

HOUSEHOLD- AFFAIRS WHITEWASH . In making whitewash it has become quite common of late to use considerable salt , for the sake of giving hardness and tenacity to the wash . This mode is liable to one objection : a wall so washed will always have great affinity for moisture ,- arid 1 err consequencewill be inclined tOattract and fix all the smoke that gets abroad in the room . We have seen walls thus ? treated become in a few months nearly as black as 1 the stove pipe . The following we are inclined to think a better one : Mix half a pail of lime and Water ready to put on the wall ; theft . , fake a gill of wheat flour , mix it up well with a little cold watqr , then 1 pour boiling water over it till it thickens . Pour it into the whitewash whilehot , and stir the whole well together . BEDBUGS . DO not fail to treat these odoriferous marauders to mercury whenever they make their appearance . To prepare it for application , put a small quantity—say a . teaspoonful—into is . tumbler and...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ROTATION . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

ROTATION . I For the Prairie Farmer . BT ABRAHAM SMITH . M ESSRS . EDITOR : What observer of Illinois farming has not been surprised to see so fine a soil so poorly repay the labor bestowed on it , and who has not asked himself the question , is there not something wrong , radically wrong , in our whole system . I have for years observed that very few of our farmers make a profit on the capital invested in farm stock and tools equal to the interest on the moneyafter paying for the labor bestowed—while their farms aie every year growing poorer . Is it not folly to invest capital and labor in any business at such a rate of compensation ? Pause farmer ! make the calculation ! Are you realizing good wages and interest on the capital invested , and at the same time sustaining the fertility of your farms ? If not , quit the business or change your system . Bring in science and experiment to your council , and set about devising a better course . And here let me tell you fellow farmers , I...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ELLSWORTH'S REPORT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

ELLSWORTHS REPORT . This annual document , so much looked for of late years , is received by us ; and we shall proceed to make up an article from its pages for each month ; until we present such of its facts as we deem of most interests to our readers . We notice that this is a much larger document than ariy of its predecessors , consisting of 520 pages—being an increase from the preceding one of 186 pages . It seems also to be compiled with more care though with the same general method . It presents its usual estimate of crops for 1844 , with a summary of the reasons on which it is founded , in the shape of extracts from papers and letters from individuals in all sections of the country . By this table the population and products of the States of Illinois , Indiana * Missouri aid Michigan and the Territories of Wisconsin and Iowa are , € s follows : Indiana—population in 1840 , 685 , 866 ; present estimated population , 868 , 175 ; number of bushels of wheat , 5 , 419 ,- 000 ; numb...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
VETERINARY DEPARTMENT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

VETERINARY DEPARTMENT . SCAB IN SHEEP . One of the most common and far the most destructive of all the diseases to which sheep are liable in the United States , is what is called the the Scab or Itch . Indeed it is thought by some to be more destructive than all other diseases together . So infectious is it , that having once entered a flock , whatever be its size , unless stayed in its progress , it is felt by every animal . It may not only be taken by one sheep from another , but every tree , stone , or post , against which an infected animal has rubbed , becomes the conveyor of it to the rest . Hence , when once it makes its appearance in a flock , the proprietor may as well sit down to its cure at once , and keep at it , till the pest is exterminated . Symptoms . It makes its first appearance on the shoulders and back . The animal is seen rubbing itself against every object , the irritation constantly increasing , till it tears out its wool with its teeth , and exhibits the most...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
. ORCHARD AND GARDEN . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

. ORCHARD AND GARDEN . TFIE SPITZENBURG APPLE . This standard apple is so well , known , that no particular description of it is necessary . There are three or four varieties of it , called Esopus , Flushing , Pownal , and Newtown Spitzcnburg ; but these a * re probably not more different from each other than any one of them will produce , when grafted into stocks of different character . Wc find the color of the Esopus . for instance , described differently by different authors ; a fret about which there is nothing strange , when we reflect , that at any fruit store , a dozen barrels of Rhode Island Greenings may be found , all differing in size , color , aiid taste from each other ; and some of them so dissimilar that the family resemblance ishardly , detected . The description of the Spitzenburg which nearest accords with the fruit as generally seen by us is a trifle oblong , deep scarlet , approaching to crimson next the sun ; flesh juicy and high flavored . It ripensin December...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
UNKNOWN [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

WiitE W OR « S . There is scarcely . any pest equal to these , when they become plenty . In the early stages of vegetation , and particularly before the seed is up , ihe yicat their way into the kernel and continue tliier depredation after it is up , till the grain is entirely destroyed . They-are more destructive upon corn and beans because , the small quantity of seed planted , enables ( hem to cqiictvitratetheir efforts for greater destruction . W e l | ave taken . out , . . this season , more than twenty from one hill of beans— -five or six of them having bored their way into a ; single IterhclV Grain so perforated will sometimes come up ; but will prosent a woful and pock-marked appearance and more generally come to nothing . .: Wc have tried soaking in saltpetre , but without -much success . They will endure a considerable , quantity ; and a little too much destroys the germinating power , of the seed . We believe the better . way is , as in many , other cases , to rely on ; a...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
CRADLING . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

CRADLING . I For the Prairie Farmer . BIT A . CHURCHILL . MESSRS . EDITORS : I shall not inflict on your readers a disquisition on the art or mystery of cutting grain with a cradle , for none would pay attention to it . Every man who swings the cradle is fully satisfied that he knows best howtodo . it , and can cradle a little more than any other man ; and though he swings it in such a way that all others know he is working much harder than he need , and though his raker tells , iiim that he lays four bands where but one is wanted , and makes heads on both ends of the straw , he heeds it not . He in his own mind cradles bettor than any other man can cradle . In fact I never could teach any one to swing his cradle as easy or lay his grain aswell as 1 can . I never could teach a boy to cradle until I had chased him down and fairly tired him out . ; then he would begin to think about trying to do his work easy . But 1 took my pen with the intention of describing to those who arc not in...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
AGRICULTURAL ITEMS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

AGRICULTURAL ITEMS . VERMIN ON F OWLS . A writer in the Boston Oulttvator says that if fowls are allowed free access to a box of dry ashes or even dry earth to roll in , and are well fed , they will not be troubled with vermin . WHAT Cows CAN DO . The Report of the New York State Agricultural Society gives the produce of 40 cows , kept by Mr . A . Hall , as 585 lbs . of cheese and 5 lbs . butter each , in one season . The whey was fed to 20 of them . A . L . Fish of Herkimer county made 592 lbs . of cheese per cow , up to the 17 th of September . His average from 25 cows , for the last three years has been 590 lbs . Elisba Baker of Oneida county-in 1843 made an averngeo £ 500 lbs . of cheese and 50 lbs . of butler per cow between the lSth of April and the 1 st of December . The Albany Cultivator says that a Mr . Fuller of Vermont has made for two years , each season , 200 lbs . of but ter per cow , having made , in the month of July , from one cow , 16 i lbs . per week . Mr . Porter...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
TAXATION TO SUPPORT SCHOOLS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

TAXATION TO SUPPORT SCHOOLS . To the exclusion of agricultural matter , we must insert a word of explanation of sections 84 and 85 of the School Law . Lands of Non-residents . Some have doubted the right of levying a school tax under the new law upon lands owned by non-residents . Great stress is laid upon the word themselves in the 5 th line of sc-c . 85 . We are no lawyer , but we say if the land * owned by non-residents cannot be taxed , neither can the properly of those voting against the lax . This is our view of the matter : Theinhabitanls are first to vote whether they will tax themselves , or in other words , the-property of . the district , as expressed in . tho latter part of the section , and if two thirds vote for it , all in the district arc to be governed b y it . The latter part of the section prescribes what-property shall be assessed , in the following words : said clerk shall compute each man s taxin said district , taking aa abasu ( he total amount of taxable prop...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT . THE NEW SGHOOL LAW . Although the school law passed at the last session of the legislature is by no means what many of the friends of education desired , yet it is a decided improvement upon the old one . It is much simplified , and contains several new and important provisions , and is so constructed as 1 to admit of amendments very easy . But if one half is done that can be under this law as it is , great will be the improvements in our schools . We want a good law , to be sure , but we Wantaction more . Yes , we wantaclion , ACTION , ACTION ; and this you farmers must give . How few of you consider the importance of laying by good schools , broad and deep foundations of prosperity for your children and youf childrens children ! . Yet this is what patents are laboring for ; and why is it that education , as a means of permanent prosperity and happiness , is so slightly valued 1 Why is the mind—the immortal mind—cared for so little , compared with the bod y...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
INDEX TO THE SCHOOL UW [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

INDEX TO THE SCHOOL UW ( ff * The Figures refer lo Sections . AUDITOR OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS . Sales of school lands reported to , 24 to make out patents , 25 to keep record of do . 25 to apportion school money , 77 to file affidavits of lost patents , 20 Books for record , 11 , 24 , 51 Costs of suit , when shall not be charged , 87 . ColWTT COMMISSIONERS 1 CoUBT . . to approve school commissioners bond , 7 may increase amount of bond , 10 to fill vacancy of school commissioner , 8 may remove school commissioner , 10 to receive report of do . 23 CLERK or . to file and copy lists of sales of lands , 24 to give notice pf election of trustees , 37 when shall assess school tax , 85 Certificates ofland , to replace lost , 26 exchanged for patents , 25 Children enumerated , 68 , 77 Debts . due school fund to have priority , SO how settled and compromised , 34 school , to pay by tax , 84 Election of trustees of schools , 35—43 school commissioner , 7 school directors , 60 Judges and clerks of ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
TAXAWON TO SUPPORT SCHOOLS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

TAXAWON TO SUPPORT SCHOOLS . We present our readers with ( hat portion of the memorial to the Illinois legislature relating to taxation for the support of schools , which was prepared by the committee of the common school convention that assembled at Peoria last fall . We do hope the principle , of taxation will he tried , and if approved of , an increase , of the per cent , can be obtained . ; After presentingthe plan of official organization ,, the memorial says : We come now to consider finally , the one great requisite of the proposed plan—taxation .. Each of the other parts are considered essential , yet they are but machinery to work this result . We come out frankly and boldly , and acknowledge the whole system—every effort , is intended only as a means of allurement to draw the people into ihc grasp of this most awful monster—a school tax . But . start not back in alarm . After all , he may not be so terrible as some have perhaps imagined . Used with skill and judgment , and...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SELECT SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

SELECT SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES . We have so often been taken to task for a passage in the comrnon school memorial to the legislature , with icgard to select schools and academies , that we . must say a word of explanation . We wrote strong , for we felt strong for common schools , and on account of the length of the memorial , : we did not wish to use much space upon this ppint , so that our views were not fully expressed . Still , we stand by them ; and we have seen none , except a few whom we consider too aristocratic for the open-hearted West , who did not acknowledge , after quizzing to their hearts content , that the views were correct . We subjoin And here permit us to say one word upon the propriety and necessity of discountenancing the erection of those nurseries of pomposity and contemptible vanity , yclept select schools or academies . They may be of occasional advantage to individuals , but they are a positive curse to the public in such a population as exists generally in ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
[ For the Prairie Farmer . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

[ For the Prairie Farmer . THE REVIEWERS REVIEWED . BY SOLON RODlNSON . MESSRS . EDITORS : A word with yoil . Firstly you see I date from home again ,-where I arrived five days ago , having performed a two thousand mile tour in the Stales of Indiana , Illinois , Missouri , Kentucky , Tennessee , Mississippi , Louisiana and Arkansas ; during which I have had an opportunity to see many things that .-1 expected I might be able to interest your readers With a description of . But I am deterred from the effort , for fear that I might happen to speak of some contemptible little dull village through which I passed , as not a very promising one , and fdr which I should get as bad a cat-hauling as I did in your April number for the half dozen lines that I devoted to the notice pf a certain village , ( I must hot call names any more * I suppose , ) iria style of language that vjouid have provoked a laugh instead of the angry ad caplandum one that it has * if every word . I said had pot been t...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
NORTHERN ILLINIOS—PROGRESS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

NORTHERN ILLINIOS—PROGRESS . [ For the Prairie Farmer . MESSRS . EDITORS : In October last , I took an excursion from the county of Grant in Wisconsin Territory ( the mines , ) through Freeport , Rockford , Belviderc and St . Charles , to Chicago . I was amazed to witness the growth and advancement of that wide expanse of territory within the last five years . So great an increase of wealth and population—such a deluge of men , women and children , horses , cattle and sheep and every kind and description of personal property , as has within that period literally poured over those vast plains , outruns all parallel in the growth of a new country . I found Belvidere , which but the other day was no where , nestling in the bosom of Squaw Prairie , bearing all the marks of a while paternity , at least ; and St . Charles so lately a mere village , buzzing and roaring and rattling with all manner of machinery like a pocket model of Lowell ; and then , to look at the various avenues of tra...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SMTJT IN WHEAT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

SMTJT IN WHEAT . \ For the Prairie Farmer . IIY A . L . CASTLEMAN . MESSRS . EDITORS : I am very glad to see the subject of the causes of smut in wheat discussed in the two last numbers of your paper , and propose to have the discussion continued by adding my mile of experience arid observation . First then , lo Mr . Hardup , 1 say the plan recommended in the March number of the Farmer is excellent , probably the best one now in use . But as scientific farming is in its infancy , it is right that we should be correct in theory as well as in practice , else the utility of our discovery slops with its first application , whereas on the other hand , if our theory be correct , or in other words , if we attribute an effect to its proper cause , we are enabled to apply the same fact to other subjects and with our eyes opened as to what we are about . Now , how do brine and lime prevent smut in wheat ? ¦ By destroying the vitality of the spnrules , says Blr . Hardup . Let us see , on &...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
CULTIVATION OF TEASELS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

CULTIVATION OF TEASELS . [ For the Prairie Farmer . ¦¦ BY D . W . RAYMOND . MESSRS . EDITORS : Presuming ! that but few of our western farmers are conversant with the culture of teasels , and as the article finds , a ready sale in- the manufacturing portionsof ; our country and already a home demand has . commenced , I send you a statement of the manner of cultivation dictated by an experienced grower of the article . ; Prepare a small plat of ground , say half an acre to an ; acre or more ; of rich soil , by plowing and harrowing thoroughl y , and in ; Hie month of July or August sow the seed iri ,. drills i about threefeet apart , the same depth that corn is : usually planted . They require no further attention the first season . Early in the * following spring the furrows should be thinned out leaving np sprouts nearer than two feet apart . ; The [ surpltis stems can at thistime be transplanted , in fresh soil . After this they shoukl . be kept entirely Tree ; front weeds by plow...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
DllAINING . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

DllAINING . Mr . W- Buchanan , sending us a copy of the Newry ( Ireland ) Telegraph , remarks as follows iu relation to draining : I conceive that nothing could conduce more to the improvement of our vast p . raiiies than a general plan of draining ; there being numerous creeks through different parts of the prairies , whose channels are completely stopped by the luxuriant grass , the grow th of ages ; yet the channels of those creeks if thoroughly cleared oul would answer admirably every purpose of main drains . The beds of the main and secondary rivers as far as I have seen are of sufficient depth to admit of the small creeks being considerably deepened ; thus giving a facility to the settler of leading his smaller , drains into these channels ; for I am certain if a general plan of draining could be devised much of the best lands of the prairies would be brought into cultivation , and even the produce of the dry lands considerably increased , not to say anything of the increased ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 June 1845

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT . A NOVEL HOUSE lOWEB . A singular mode of applying power to threshing , or any other purpose , is used in Winnebago county . The machine consists of an upright shaft , on the upper end of which is a cog wheel , turning another wheel connected by a shaft with a drum , around which the same band passes that turns the threshing cylinder . The upright shaft first mentioned is turned by a lever of any desired length—say 20 feet—the horses being fastened to its end , which forms the axle of a solid wheel , into the periphery of which a number of spikes are driven , to aid iu turning . For an additional pair of horses , another lever is fastened to the upright shaft , at right angles to the first . The advantages secured are , a long lever by which the power is applied to- great advantage , and any degree of motion desired . The harmonizing of the power and motion is a difficulty , but imperfectly overcome in most of the horse powers in use . This machine is the inve...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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