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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

TT -r "- - 1 ir r (-pu-jvps t r?, fj7"VTli)-,r fy j y-i - -Vr4 rVT . I" r7 r The Indian Advocaik :. An old work of the date of 1762 has the following ac count of the origin of the term "lady": "I will "satisfy you how it came to pass that women of fortune' were called 'ladies,' even before their husbands had any title to convey the mark of distinction to them. It was generally the fashion for a lady of affluence, once a week or oftener, to distribute a certain quantity of bread to her poor neighbors with her own hands, and she was called by them 'leaf-day;' that is, loaf-giver, or, as it is sometimes explained, the bread-giver." 'Wonder howmany so-called ladies practiceVthe original sig nification of the term? rs Fhanklin: .Beware of little expenses a small leak will sink a great ship. language of , conversation in public and. private. Among the branches faf learning. Qintrincr wnc alcn nrnminptit ' Th cir1 4. o ""-tr"o "" "" ...w ...w -w 0--- y were, besides, obliged to learn all t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

,W?,pfWwW'fFr " JSTJf ? a The Inpian Advocaii: i "ra-Y- "pr 1 Ik; &' K. ;r K" History of Oklahoma From the Repoit of Ex-Goy. Jenkins. J ( Historically considered, Oklahoma as a territory is of re cent origin, but as a small portion of the great tract of south western country, known at various times and under various circumstances as Louisiana, Mandan Territory, the Great American Desert, uninhabitable lands and the Indian Terri tory, it has a place in the history of the nation dating back to the days of Ahe Spanish explorers, who sought in the great Southwest unknown empires and their reputed fabulous wealth. Following the course of travel described in inany early Spanish manuscripts and books, one is readily convinced that the original Oklahoma boomers were the little army of adven turous spirits who traversed the Southwest under the leader ship of De Soto, and that they were followed by Jesuits and others who sought wealth in the mineral veins of the moun tains and hills of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

;siyf The Indian Aijvocaik. t t i "K Some time early in the 'seventies the name of Oklahoma first appears in political history, the occasion being the intro duction in Congress of a bill to create a territory out of a por tion of the Indian Territory to be known as Oklahoma. The measure failed of passage, and for more than a decade" little 'or nothing was heard of this country. Then came the agitation started by Payne and Couch and kept up by their intrepid little band of boomers until, in March, 1889, in the dying hours of Congress, an amendment was tacked on the Indian appropriation bill providing for the opening to homestead settlement of the little area of land then known as Oklahoma, embracing' less than 3,000,000 acres now lying in the heart of a great Territory. u This land was opened on April 22, 1889, and then oc curred the first great Oklahoma rush. The brief legislation opening the land' provided no form of government, and for over a year the people of the Territory were ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

PKfyfflT g " " 7f?7,r'5T',r,"''ir' "'"-' " V "Y V V 8 Thh Indian Advocate. x given to the Territory by a decision of the Supreme Court of ! the United States. f AH these, witli the Kiowa, Comanche and Apache and , Wichita Indian reservations just opened, give the Territory a settled area of 24,000,000 acres, 1,725,646 still being included in Indian reservations. v. This, in brief, is the story of the creation of Oklahoma Territory, but of the long struggles to secure the various en actments of Congress required to bring it about, of the sue- " i cessive great rushes of settlers to the country, of the strug gles to build up here an ideal American commonwealth, and ' of the great measure of success attained, volumes might be written. In the little more than a decade which has elapsed since v the creation of the Territory, the people have accomplished here more than any other community has ever accomplished in a quarter of a century. The story of the achievements of this pepple, whose ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

m v The Indian Advocate, c School System Condemned. ) The question of the education of the Indian is one whiqh for years past has been under continual discussion. It is a problem which has provoked warm argument in the halls of Qongiess and able editorials in all the press of the country. Government officials have applied their various divergent , theories to its( solution and vast sums of money have been at then disposal with which to experiment. And now comes Mr. Jones, the Indian Commissioner, who, in his annual re port to the Secretary of the Interior, condemns the present system and pronounces it "an obstacle to the progress of the Indians toward independence and self-support." This is a serious admission after all these years of wasted funds and efforts. It is a candid confession that the present (Indiani educational system has, not and cannot produce the results so enthusiastically claimed for it. Mr. Jones not only admits it, but he expressly says so. And yet he has only com...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

W&F&X rr" F& y33rffiFff' 1'''''SjBii,Vff,"'i''' trpr ';wtyTr'V'yr7r ,iK.v"TSr, '"'"? ft 10 The. Indian Advocate, fc s IC in reality come. Under it the Indian is not transported miles w away from home out of the State, or "poverted to one of affluence."-' 'He is kept at home; taught the trades; the art of m ' tillinor fVio cnil flio loccnnc rf inlncfrv. nrnHpnpp. frilfralltv. :.r v t "- ! .- w ..j, r-.. , 0 ., , - , kV given an incentive to labor for self and children, the things v j which government sought to teach him, and, as the Commis- " t , sioner admits, failed to impart. It is true that the same sys- ' tern taught him a knowledge of God and religion, and he is none the worse for it. On the contrary, to that influence he r'y owes all the civilization and progress which he has made in ? '' 1.1 .'. -i.L.Li mi i. ..! r.,u -Ti. i j i : r. me past, or tnai ne win mane in ine iuiure. n wuuiu ue wise, ' "! 'therefore, to return to the system so beneficial to the Indian, -...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

H).'iCI'n t f n f" 4 'V Thf; Ikdian AuvQCAit. ti trust fund among the tribes of the Southwest and a number of other tribes of less importance. (The opponents of this move on the part of the Catholic officials declare that it will result in great opposition on the part of those who have been interested in the non-sectarian schools and have insisted that the.government give no aid to the sectarian schools. It is recalled that when the Browning ruling order was issued recently by the Secretary of the Interior suspending the effect of the ruling, it was stated that if it was found the sus- pension did not work satisfactorily he would again rescind it. u , WVWVSSM As will be seen by reference to his communication, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs emphatically condemns the system" of boarding schools for Indian children inaugurated by some blind zealots dmong the Protestant ministers. He calls them "well-meant mistakes." They are "mistakes" surely; but as to the intention of their origi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

, n 12 The Indian Advocate. Js r. ' ! r., - A LV. Indian Commissioner Admits, Failure. The Government Reservation Schools Have Not benefited it he Indians, Says Mr. Jones. The Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Mr. Jones, formally admits, in his annual report, that the present system of edu cation for the Indians is a flat failure. He says the system fails because it makes the Indian dependent instead of inde pendent; it makes him look to the government for stpport, instead of earning it; it makes him accept the government's schooling and clothing and maintenance, not as a favor, but as his right. The Indian has cometo the state, according to Mr. Jones, when he considers that he favors the government by taking advantage of its educational facilities. Thereupon the. Commissioner studies statistics. i "There are now in operation," he says, "one hundred and thirteen boarding schools for the Indians, with an average at tendance of something over sixteen thousand pupils, ranging from five t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

, jjwi"mMm '" ' k The Indian Advocate. 13 ti r one chouse suitable to his condjtionand furnish it through out; to fence his land and build him a barn; to buy him a wagon and team- and harness; to furnish his plows and the other implements necessary to cultivate the ground, and to give him something besides to embellish and beautify his home." The Commissioner is plainly depressed. He admits the hopelessness of all measures which the government has taken for the betterment of the Indian. The most hopeless thing of all is his conclusion. The Indian must, at all cost, be taken out of a state of dependence, he declares. "And the only way to do this is to take away these things that encour age him to lead an idle life, andr after giving him a fair start, leave him tq take care of himself. To that it must come in the end, and the sooner steps are taken to bring it about the better. That there will be many failures and. much suffering is inevitable in the very nature of things, for it is o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

! "PC-V - -n ' v j-v y. 5 - - . "S , ? T iff I1 14. , The Indian Advocate. .. - . . m danger of failure, because of the withdrawal ot the govern- f ,t. ment appropriations. Meantime, these appropriations have ,4 been withdrawn. That is another point Mr. Jones forgets. 4 ' He savs Tnrlinn vnnthc nftnrl fhf crnvprnmpnh crhnnls flR if they were conferring a favor upon the government. He does (Tf not remember, or does not wish to remember, that the ma- vvA M" " jority of the Indians do not wish their children to attend the i t. i , K if. i k u4. .u u., . ...... i. .,.. T.i. ,...., ..-, ....-. ;? Godless government institutions. He does not remember ' y, $ that the schools to which the Indians are loyal and where i. , their children go freely are maimed and crippled by the unjust ''jf5if action of that government whose benevolence he thinks so ' "$$ -v r; unappreciated. 0 ''Cfe" He blames the Indians for their dependence and lack of ; . initiative. He forgets that the government has igno...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

- T -..i. IT" '"' " '""'Twwmwwwin wn'i".i"ri" gwiuiwLj ihiwjtvpi1'.lp , ti Thu Indian Advqcai'e. 15 sioner's mournful cpnfession qf failure. In the face of it, at any rate, something must b'e done, and done promptly. ' Per haps the Administration will yet recognize that a grievous mistake has been made, and draw something like victory out of so unnecessary a defeat. It may be. But there is inex plicable blindness somewhere. Already, in the Philippines, has been inaugurated the same policy pf secularizingeduca tion which has resulted so disastrously among the Indians. . It will fail there also. Uncle Sam is a difficult tmDil. It is -s U,.. . ,.. ,,,,. . ..... , nanny 10 oe expected rnar ne wouia learn uy precepr, duc w ' most nations are glad to profit by the bitterness of expe- - rience. 1 , Later dispatches from Washington show that the annual ' t - report of Secretary Hitchcock, of the 'Interior Department, fyfv indorses the conclusions submitted by Commissioner Jones. v w Mr. Hit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

f. ik a fo ' Sfe5? w. TSp 16 The Indian Advocate. C A True Missionary Dead. ) Rev. Gerhard Terhdrst died Oct. 3, 1901, aged 72 years, at Baraga, Mich., were he was administering to the Indians for forty-one years. The Rev. Father Terhorst learned the Chippewa language; he was ready, day and night, to go any where, on foot or horseback, road or nd road, through forest, lake and river, whensoever and wheresoever duty called him. God alone knows his works of charity. The following letter, written by a school-girl, will be read with interest: Father Terhorst was born in Muensfer, Hanover, about eighty years ago. He was a good priest, and spent 41 years with the Indians at Baraga. He was ordained at that time by the first Bishop of Marquette, Bishop Baraga. He used to roll up his sleeves and work with the Indians. He taught them to plow and many other useful things. The Indians he worked with belonged to the Chippewa tribe. He learned the Indian language, so he could teach them the beads...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

7 Tin: Indian Advocate. 1 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE !rr -"--' 1'uhlNhcd by the Klcncdictine Fathers of .-: A Monthly Review Un ler the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Rev. Then. Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories 'I'KKMH Oli1 HUllSOUIlTIONl Single Copies , . . 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Rntcred as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart. Oklahoma. fRlVIIiKGHSl 1. I'A ery Subscriber and Benefactor will participate :n sill the merits prayers and j;ond works of the Religion of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Maw is Mine every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactor. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Kvery year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are Minn fr 0"r l"H" fac...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

""'" Q i8 The Indian Advocate. Pin not your faith to another's sleeve. . Good intentions will not justify evil actions. ' ' There is a time lor .ail .things even for retribution. - - True philosophy consists in doing all the good we can, in learning all the good we can, in teaching to others all the good we can, in bearing, to the best of our.ability, the various ills of life, and in -enjoying, with gratitude, every 'honest pleasure that conies in our way. - Invention has added a new word to the wodd'.s vocabu lary. In French and English, it is automobile; in German, it is automobiletaxameterdroschken, and in Flemish it is a "pied" linotype machine, something we doubt if any mp can if spell, much less pronounce. If you think -you 'can, try it.' Here if is: "Snelpardelooszoonderpoorwegpetroolrijuig.'r m Wonderful, isn't it? Christian education is a companion which no misfortune. , can suppress, no clime destroy, no enemy alienate, no des potism enslave. At home? a friend; abroad, an ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

M X This. Indian Advocate. 19 staiitled,fbut,.vOnt; recovering- herself, isaidr "Brom thisfmo ment, sir, When' 1 .discover that ;you -do not regard. religion, I cease !to be yours. Hewho'fdoes not love and 'honor, .God can never love his wife constantly and sincerely.'." r - ' Having friends'is' strengthening one's heartagainst tria'l; it is giving it means of rising iore' easily to God. ' - A friend is a conductor which'1 carries off sorrow. 'Nothing-is soJ deal ing "as the balm of affection. But friends must',bewoh. Being" loved for one's self alone is a roinant'ic dreaml'Goo makes advances to' win friends; why should' not we? ' Charj acter, 'doubtless, has much to do with friendship affording more or' less sympathy, but efforts complete what,rsyn1pathy hasl)egunJto have friends' merit them. " .' '!t . - n r u f h i In 1877 there AVfis published at Kensington, -England, a "Li,stof Bibles in tliQ, Canton Exhibition," respecting which an E.nglish papec remarked, as follows: fk4This ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

20 The Indian Advocate. age and nomadic tribes into peaceful, orderly, settled and virtuous communities of farmers and stock-raisers. All ye need to achieve similar success is the grace of God and the spirit of self-sacrifice. -. , One of the aggravations of life is the meddlesome neigh- bor. That person pries into the private affairs of everyone in the neighborhood; carries stories back and forth that set friends at enmity; turning frivolous remarks into deliberate statements, magnifying chance expressions, distorting senti ments and altering the tones in which thoughtless things were said; knows everybody's business better than themselves and insists on offering advice at every turn; tries ev'en to como between husband and wife, to bring disagreements between them. The meddlesome neighbor is a nuisance. Interfer ence from that quarter must be summarily suppjessed, at any and every cost of insult, breach of friendliness and calumny. Far better an open foe out-doors, with peace at h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

r- -r-v t. v w j "f Thf Indian Auvocati.. 21 A -" i L. ) V' -" - IK i V. Vr- r ' i 1 v i&f,Mii$nJt.KM v, and we have lost the faculty, it seems, of enjoying that men tal and physical quietude in which only can grow the finer and more intangible graces and charms of life Oh, what an age of wear and worry, When all the world is in a hurry! The useless task still undertaking Of record-making, record-breaking. A kui.inr was made some years ago by Mr. Browning, whgn he was U. S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs, to the effect that Indian parents had no right to choose a school for their children, nor to prevent their children from being sent to a school objectionable to them; that the agent on a reserva tion was the perspn to decide to what school the Indian chil dren on it should .be sent, and that not till the government school was full, could a child be sent to a Catholic school. That ruling was a denial of an inalienable parental right. It was a worse tyranny than all the acts of o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

1 j&r-rjnjjP- ,. I1 mrr TTKi " CV 22 The Indian Advocate. mfWWW &, Mx- ; V H Be weather, how much has man to do with hVor who is He that wholds the waters in the hollow of His hands? "Hast thou entered into the storehouses of the snow, or hast thou beheld the treasures of the hail? By what way is the light spread and heat divided upon the earth? Who gave a course to vio lent showers, or a way to noisy thunder: that it should rain on the earth without man in the wilderness, where no mortal dwelleth: that it should fill the desert and desolate land, and should bring forth green grass? Who is the father of rain, or who begot the drops of dew? Out of whose womb came the ice, and the frost from heaven who hath gendered it?" Job, chap, xxxviit. One momerit of consideration, therefore, frees the weather and the climate from all blame; and there are few of us who'would presume to doubt the wisdom of the Creator even under the direst calamities of weather or clime. -, f , 'AriER the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

-5?mvH pf "rs;rwy jj'nf7Vn,'?"nvw -t vccjy iv, F i . $ " ,-f -Tur Ikdian Advocaik. iV rt .f ,y V. f t- 23 Dancing. 5 ' t I RQM '1HE HIW.E. - , , - Their children dance and play, they take the timbrel and ' the'Jiarp, and rejoice at the sound-.of the organ. . . .and in a $w cV f v moment they go down to hell, -Job xxi, 11-13. Use not v S v much the company of her that is a dancer, and hearken not to Vf t j x her, lest thou perish by the force of her charms. Eccl. ix, 4. v " St. John the Baptist fell a victim to the dancing Herodias, ' And when Moses came down from the mount andv;saw- the 4e r - dances: and being very angry, he threw the tables (With the ten-commandments) out of his hand and broke them- at the s "foot of the mount. Exod. xxii, 19. This quotation does not r' ' constitute an argument against dancing, but gives us a most , ominous sign showing that the whole-'of the ten command- 1 y.JL .- .n . 1 1 ... 1 . .1 r 11. 1 v-;i menis may De oronen at tne occasion 01 me aance. "...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

24 Tun Indian Advocate. "ff t C T fS i suiting from the dance of Herodias, addst4 "What do you think of sthis spectacle, Christian women? Have a care what impressions you give your daughters and what they should learn to fear. Here you see a girl that dances; but what sort of a girl? She is the daughter of an adulterous woman, for dancing is befitting to only that kind of people. But those 'who possess modesty and religion must instill into thejninds of their daughters a love of retirement and the fear of God, rather than the love of dancing." 1 f OTHER AUTHORITIES. The Council of Constantinople forbids public dances un der pain of excommunication. The Council of Aix la Cha pelle designates them as something dishonest, that of Rouen as something foolish, and that of Tours as the artifices and snares of the devil. The Roman Senate, at the time of ?Tibe rius, had all dancers driven out of Rome. Ovid calls dances the shipwreck of morality and the seed of vice. "Dancing serves only to d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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