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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Translated from Le. Propasateur Catholiiiue. Rome. A letter from Rome, written by Al. de Narp to one of his friends, informs us that the Sovereign Pontiff has received Algr. de Bonald with very particular marks of esteem and distinction. In an interview, he mentioned the Mandement which the Cardinal published last year against the Manuel of AI. Dnpin ; and he told him that, having received it at Imola, he had got it translated, and had the translation printed for circulation in his diocese. Pius IX evidences a very particular esteem for the clergy of France ; and it is not doubted but he will second, with all his power, the French Episcopacy in the efforts they will continue to make to obtain the liberty of teaching. The proofs of esteem given by the Ponj tiff to Cardinal de Bonald, who has been one of the boldest champions of educational liberty, and one of the most energetic opponents the government hasMiad to encounter in its projects for the destruction o...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Arrival of the Hibernia. SEVEN DAYS LATER NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

Arrival of the Hibernia. SEVEN DAYS LATER NEWS. The Hibernia arrived on Saturday last, at o’clock in the morning, in IS£ days from Liverpool. She brought 108 passengers. There has been an advance in the cotton market. The corn*tnarket was less buoyant, and wheat had fallen from Id to 2c? per bushel, on the 15th. There was an increased demand for Indian Corn at an advance of Is per quarter ; the best yellow brought 445, and white 46s per 480 lbs. There was a moderate sale for barrel Flour at the reduced prices of Friday last; Philadelphia brought 30s, and the Western Canal 31s per barrel. France. Free-trade principles are making rapid strides in France. A meeting of the principal merchants and manufacturers has just taken place at Lyons, with a view of forming a free-trade association in that important city. The Debats declares itself a convert to free trade in an article which promises to be but the introduction to a series on the same subject. The Journal des Debats states, that th...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TRIUMPHANT PROGRESS OF THE LIBERATOR. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

TRIUMPHANT PROGRESS OF THE LIBERATOR. From the Tipperary Vindicator. It being known that the Liberator was to pass through Nenagh on Thursday (Sept. 10) on his way to Darrynnne, preparations were made from an early hour in the morning to get up a suitable reception. The hand of the Temperance society played through the streets, which presented a very animated scene at twelve o’clock, the hour at which the procession of the Trades was formed to proceed on their way to meet O’Connell. All the cars and vehicles in the town were in requisition, as most of the merchants, traders, and other inhabitants joined in the cavalcade to welcome Ireland’s illustrious leader and Liberator. The Town Commissioners headed the procession in n carriage drawn by four horses; next followed a numerous train of cars occupied by the Trades and other inhabitants, and by many of the Clergy from the surrounding districts, who had come to the town to testify their respect, and fidelity towards the great Apostle ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
GREAT EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

GREAT EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE. This great “(Ecumenical Council of Christians,” as its adherents call it, was held last week, Sir Culling Eardley Smith was the presiding patriarch. We cannot he mistaken in saying that this is the first “(Ecumenical Council” admitted to by “One shilling tickets,” and exhibiting ladies at the side galleries. One tone of enthusiastic self-complacency pervaded the whole oratory of the platform; the elevation of spirits was Bacchanlian, and the Synod reeled with magniloquence and selfadulation. Each speaker as he rose up, professed himself overwhelmed by the moral grandieur of the scene; he could not describe what he saw; it was unutterable, ineffable: he could not describe what he felt; it was a swell and an ecstacy. Such a sublimation and ebriety of com- j moil place, such an ocean of Exeter Hall poetry, never raged before. An audacious | profane application of Scripture, of course, j accompanied these effusions. The alliance was described as a “mighty mor...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LETTER FROM SMITH O'BRIEN, M.P., TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE LORD JOHN RUSSELL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

LETTER FROM SMITH O'BRIEN, M.P., TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE LORD JOHN RUSSELL. Cahirmoyle, Sept. 9, 1846. My Lord —Before three months shall have elapsed, several millions of the population of this kingdom will, by the failure of the potato crop, be left destitue of i the supply of provision which, under ordinary circumstances, would have sustained them until the autumn of next year. In many districts the people are now living upon diseased potatoes unfit for human food, and within a few weeks will be deprived of even this wretched sustenance. How is famine to be averted? How is order to be preserved? Has the legislature enacted laws suited for the emergency? Have the government made arrangements adequate to the crisis? These are questions which absorb the attention of the most indifferent—which appal the hearts of the most courageous. Never more than at the present moment has Ireland had reason to deplose the loss of its legislature —an Irish ministry, would deliberate with an earnestn...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LINES TO THE IRISH IN AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

LINES TO THE IRISH IN AMERICA. BY DOCTOR STEPHENSON. For the Bouton Pilot. Up ! up for green Erin ! dissension no more S'mll sully the cause as it sullied before Up ! up to the strife till the Saxon retires, From tlie land of your birth—the sweet land of your sires. Oh ! have ye not learned, from history's pages, The woes of your country through slavery’s ages, Were caused by accursed division, tile bane, That forged all her fetters and fastened the chain. Now work ye together—let harmony heal The wounds which division hus left on Repeal; Your leaders are onward on liberty's track, Let the millions stand sternly, still at their back. Up ! up for green Erin ! from hill and from valley, Conte lbrth in your might and as patriots rally ; Unite in your strength, aud division no more Shall sully the cause, as it sullied la-fure. Knetlaml st., lloston.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CINCINNATI, [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

CINCINNATI, 26 th September, 1546. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot: Dear Sir, —To-day when I received the Pilot of the 19th inst, with great pleasure as 1 usually do, 1 read over its columns, until my attention was directed to a letter, the writer of which signs J. O’D., and the same being addressed to the Irishmen of the United States, and, begging to direct their attention again to questions of vital importance, fearful consequences and portentous magnitude, with regard to the future destiny of our native land. Alluding to the dissensions in Conciliation Hall, between the parties nicknamed Old and Voung Ireland, J. O’D. gives it as his mind, that if there should bo any meaning in those terms,they should have changed places,and then he has the audacity to-assert that if truth, honor, knowledge, dignity or candor, &.C., be old, the Voung Ireland party may. claim it as characteristic of their cause and deportment, whilst he accuses the great Liberator of his country and...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
YOUNG IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

YOUNG IRELAND. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot: Sir, —I have read in the last number of your paper an article under the title of “The Controversy,” setting forth your sentiments on the unfortunate differences which now agitate unhappy Ireland; and as you have stated your willingness to concede to others the same opportunity, 1 beg leave most respectfully to take advantage of the offer; at the same time reiterating your desire that w hatever sentiments are expressed or set forth should be, without the loss of urbanity and mutual esteem. The late unfortunate and unhappy transactions in Conciliation Hall cannot but fill every Irish heart, every lover of his nativity with most bitter anguish; they cannot but cast a dark cloud of despondency over the dazzling lustre of his fondest wish, his proudest anticipations. And though he may be ready to curse those from whence they sprung, not knowing why, still, 1 do think that when our better judgment has taken its sway, when the warmer passio...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

Boarders wanted at 75 Knbeland STB KET. OCt Edward dolan, merchant TA lIjOR, (Late of Boston), 14i Westminster street, Providence, It. t, respectfully solicits the patronage ofhis friends and the public. He hopes to render good satisfaction to those who please favor him with a call He will keep a good assortment of Cloths, Cassimeres, Doeskins, Vestings, Ac. Also, Ready Made Garments from his own establishment by the best workmen. Gentlemen’s Furnishing Articles. London and Paris Fashions received quarterly. oct3 Stoves: stoves:: stoves::: TRUE & BAXTER respectfully inform their friends and the pulie, that they have taken the Score No. 4t> Congress street, As manufacturers of and dealers in Stoves, Grates, Furnaces, <s-c. They keep constantly oa hand a general assortment of Parlor, Air Tight, Ottice, and Store Stoves. Also—A variety of the most approved pattern of Cook Stoves, among which are the Economist’s Friend, Mears’ Domestic, Atwood’s Empire,...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

JS ET KNITTERS WANTED. Wanted by the subscriber, Female Net Knitters, such as were accustomed to Net Knitting in Ireland. Apply WAI. STOWE, No. £ Mercantile Wharf, _ 26—St (between City Wharf & Balt. Packet Pier.) FANCY ROODS, oj' English, French, and German Manufacture. A. S. JORDAN, Imported and Dealer, No. '£ Milk street, has recently received, and offers for sale low, for cash, a complete assortment of Hair, Tooth and Nail I Tooth Powder, and Horn Brushes, Shell, Ivory Combs, Horn and Shell side do, Snuff and Tobacco Boxes, Thimbles, Painted cigar cases, Wood lead pencils, Pocket Books, Card Cases, Port Folios, Shaving and cloth brushes, Hand and mouth mirrors, Playing cards, Cologne Water, Bear’s Oil, Macassar Oil, Violet Soap, Razors and scissors, Pen and pocket knives, Steel Pens, Perfumery, nil kinds, Shaving Soaps, Cloth and Flesh Brush s, Canes, Silk and ornamented purses, Hemming Son’s needles, Silver plated hooks A eyes, Plain and gilt knitting pins, Needles ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for SI . INFORMATION WANTED, Of MICHAEL DOLAN, formerly of Ahaseragh, county Galway, who lias been in this country about seven years. When last heard from he was in Burlington, Vt. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his cousin, Patrick Oolfy, addressed to him in care of Mr. John Larkin, No. XU Second street, South Boston, Ms. octlO—4tlT Oi MARY DOLAN, formerly of Tullamore, parish of Kilbride, King|s county. When last heard from, she was in New York in search of her brother and sister (.Thomas and Margaret Dolan), and is supposed to be at present in Boston, Ms. Any intbrmatiou respecting htr will be thankfully received by her brother, Thomas Dolan, No. ia4 Columbia, or 288 Cauuon streets, New York. octlO—4tT Of a boy by the name of JOHN FARRELL, who left his parental roof on the 15th nit.: he is 13 years old ; large for his age ; W’ore a black bombazine jacket and dark cloth pants. As he is too young to take care of...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Western's News. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

The Western's News. We continue our extracts from papers by the Great Western:— Storm at Sea. On Saturday afternoon, Sept. 19, lat. 48 34, lon. 37 43, the Great Western felt the beginning' of a storm which became terrific, and lasted till noon on Monday, the ship all the time in imminent danger, and all on board believing that their hour had come. The New York papers publish a- narrative made up of the log of Capt. Mathews and remarks of passengers. About 1 P.M. on Sunday, “whilst most of us were seated in agonizing suspence in the lower cabin, holding fast to the tables and settees, a sea struck the vessel, and a tremendous crash was heard on deck; instantly, the cabin was darkened, and torrents of water came pouring down upon us through the skylights. Scarcely bail the waters reached the floor, when all in the cabins and state rooms sprang to their feet, and simultaneously, as if by concert, the ladies uttered a scream of agony, so painful, so fearful, and so despairing, the sound...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SPEECH OF MR. O’CONNELL. BEFORE THE REPEAL ASSOCIATION, SEPT. 7. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

SPEECH OF MR. O’CONNELL. BEFORE THE REPEAL ASSOCIATION, SEPT. 7. The Liberator then proceeded to address the Association as follows:—I rise to consider the present posture of the Repeal cause, and the steps which are essentially necessary to be taken to promote its advancement. The first thing that strikes one is the deplorable state of the country —the hideous progress of famine, and the apprehension of pestilence, disease and death. There never was a more frightful prospect before us—never one in which it was necessary to use more discretion and prudence, as well as energy to meet the calamity (hear.) I am here to proclaim that there is only one thing that would drive me to despair—that there is only one thing which can make Repeal impossible, and that is—any insurrectionary movement of any kind whatever. The prevention of the free circulation of provisions, may create a glut in the particular locality where it takes place, but it will re-act on that district by preventing provisi...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE LABOR RATE ACT. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

THE LABOR RATE ACT. l)arrynane Abbey, Cahirciveen, ) Monday, \4th Sept, 1846. 3 My Dear Conway—l have only this morning got the labor rate act, and thus am aide to state its provisions accurately. I am the more anxious to do so, as my former statement of its contents was necessarily taken from the report of speeches in parliament. The act provides that the Lord Lieutenant, upon being informed of the existence of distress in any district, shall, by proclamation, direct and require “an extraordinary presentment sessions” for such district. This is mandatory upon the Presentment Sessions; they are bound to meet on the day mentioned in the proclamation, and they will be guilty of a violation of the law if they do not meet upon that day. ! Secondly—The Presentment Sessions : having met, they are bound to make Pre- ! sentments for Public Works within their district. This clause, also, is mandatory. It would be a violation of the law if they : were to refuse or neglect making such Pre- | s...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SMITH O’BRIEN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

SMITH O’BRIEN. THE PILOT. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10. IS4G. The future course of this gentlemen is interesting to the friends of Ireland. His high social position, his unimpeachable honesty, and the enthusiasm he has displayed in his country’s cause, give him an importance even beyond the solid and respectable ability he has exhibited. We do not know whether Irishmen generally estimate the difficulties which beset him in his late course at their full value; but. for our part, we are compelled to esteem him for the manner in which he has met them, even though we cannot approve the resource of which he has availed himself; First, he was not the leader of the Irish people; he was only second in their ranks. Now, to a man of less pure and exalted ambition, this would be a serious impediment. Shiel and Lawless used to contend with O’Connell for the leadership in public discussion ; and now Shiel and Wyse keep aloof from popular agitation for reasons of their own; but there is good ground for s...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE CATHOLIC HERALD. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

THE CATHOLIC HERALD. This paper has been laboring hard to disgrace the press by the employment of low personalities, and foul misrepresentations with regard to the Pilot. The writer of this has to say with respect to such attacks that he despises them too much, that he has too high an estimation of what is due to the public, and to himself, to occupy a public journal with any re,dy. But the proprietor of the Pilot, the character of whose paper this attempt has been made to blast, has determined on being heard in its defence. By industry and enterprise he has obtained a circulation for his paper unparalleled in its line. By so doing, he has injured no other journal; the Pilot has attracted, or created, a reading public for itself; and he sees no reason why he should now be exposed to misrepresentation and obloquy from those whose'success has been inferior. If any other paper can, by the same means, obtain a circle of readers equally large, their efforts will be an advantage to him, h...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE ENGLISH PRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

THE ENGLISH PRESS. Some time ago, we observed how very keen the British Newspapers, and Whigs appeared to be to raise a division among the Repealers. At that time their policy was entirely to expose and assail the unsafe and impracticable course of the Young Ireland party. Now, they are satisfied with that view of the matter; and they have taken another cue. It is their business now to run down O’Connell, and old Ireland. Just whatever will serve best to make a split, to damage both parties, and put it in the power of the British government to crush both. Accordingly, the Morning Chronicle, the organ of the British government, sympathizes exceedingly with the dissenting Repealers, rebukes Mr. Ray, and the Association for not treating them more genteely, and flatly accuses O'Connell of inconsistency. Thus he is placed between two fires: his enemies on one hand, and his professed friends on the other bring the same charge against him. But, whatever excuse may be for Young Ireland, in ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE. Translated from Le, Propagateur Catholit/ue. Duchy of Baden.—ln a letter addressed to VUnivers , dated July 29, we read:— “The elective chamber of Baden, where the revolutionary party has many leaders, is not disposed to lag behind when the Catholic Church is to be assailed. These hypocritical preachers of liberty who demand for a few corrupt apostates the most extensive political privileges, these superb advocates of dying Rongism cannot find in their elastic consciences sufficient motives to gram a legal existence in the Grand Duchy to the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent d® Paul. While we are writing these lines, Liberalism forbids by its impious vote an institution which has always had the open sympathies of every one who bears within him the heart of a man and a Christian.” “ The late Metropolitan of the Upper Rhine left by his will, twenty-five thousand florins (about ten thousand dollars) for the foundation of an establishment of Sisters charged with ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE INVITATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 10 October 1846

THE INVITATION. BY DOCTOR STEPHENSON. Child of sorrow—leave the land Where thou hast borne the Saxon’s I.rand, And flv, for hope of future fame— A life of woe—a death of shame. There cannot in the world all round, A happier land than this he found; Then haste, oh ! haste to share with me, The joys of life, where man is free. Here the sufferers of our race, Met, and meet the warm embrace; The homeless— here, a home may find, Where tyrants’ fetters will not hind. Here, the “ starry flag” doth wave In its glory o'er the brave : Oh ! come and see how God has blest, The great Republic of the “ West.” No longer lead a life of pain, Nor writhe beneath the despot’s chain, When thou canst meet, from heart and hand, A welcome to this happy land. Child of sorrow—leave the land Where thou hast borne the Saxon’s brand , And spurn, for hope of future fame— A life of woe—a death of shame.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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