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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

July 1995 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined SeptVOct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

10 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 9) WANTED—plastic figures and playsets, '50s to '70s. BoeftStutter, 16220 Eggleston St., Amelia, Va. 23002. FAT-FREE—carrot cake recipe, $2 plus, S AS.E.: M. France, Route 2, Box 178, Fenum, Va. 24088. NUMEROLOGY CHARTS—jewelry, brochure, $2. Leander & Rat, P. O. Box 178, Roseland, Va. 22967. FOR SALE —Graco duo-double stroller, excellent condition, light blue, $50. Dale, 804-384-0354, Lynchburg. DELICATE, SMALL—paper snowflakes, none alike, 25/$5. S.A.S.E: 1489 Laurens Road, Gloucester Point, Va. 23062. NOW!—frozen tomato slices, garden fresh flavor year round. Complete, easy instructions. $1, Hamiltons, Box 652-2, New Ulm, Mn. 56073. TREMENDOUS CAREER OPPORTUNITY Virginia Farm Bureau is seeking ambitious, outgoing and assertive individuals who enjoy working with the public in the Multi-Line insurance sales field. Income and benefits package includes: • Training Salary + Commission • Group Hospitalization and Dental • Life and ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

July 1995 New a Hearing Aids Qfh VP • All Models • Huge Savings • No Salesman Will Call Try Before You Buy! Write: Better Hearing, 202-B 2nd St. Brookport, IL 62910 1-800-662-5522 The safest most efficient [ 1 wood heat system on the market, the TAYLOR irtrjr —- _JW waterstove sits outside | j. B and heats your home . —_-= E and 100% of household ~~ B- • UL listed ' Jj^L. • Thermostatic control fp-^JL • 12 to 24 hour burn time -*4^2 HERITAGE BUILDING SYSTEMS 800-643-5555 Build It Yourself And Save Money 35 X 40 X 10 $5,615 40 X 60 X 10 $8,367 45 X 90 X 12 $13,825 SOX 120 X 12 $19,154 100 X 210 X 14 $63,839 Commercial steel buildings featuring easy bolt up assembly from America's laraest distributor. We hove over 10,000 standard sizes of shop, farm, industrial, commercial and mini warehouse buildings. All are complete with engineer stamped permit drawings, 20 year roof warranty, and painted walls. Call us today for a free information package, and a quote on our top quality buildings ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

!■■■ MB ' :a - l In \ i fc 1 ||l i/ITITi I Bfl H I H And You Gin Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. M m T The Health Oire programs and policies described in this ad are products of Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary TR JL J.U.vJv/1 1 health m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

Farn Bureau Vol. 54, No. 7 Farmers still digging out from disaster Farm house moves like a big boat in flood waters By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor GRAVES MILL—A Madison County family huddled together and prayed in an upstairs bedroom as tons of water, boulders and uprooted trees bombarded their house. Randall Lillard and his family were one of the hardest-hit families in Madison County when two storm systems collided in late June. Lillard, 56, has lived in Madison County for 50 years and has never seen anything comparable to what he witnessed on June 27, he said. As the Rapidan River began to spill over its banks that day, Lillard and his wife Ruth hurried to the nearby home of their son Rodney. Rodney's home is near the river. The Lillards persuaded their foster daughter Melinda Haynes, 15, daughter-in-law Clare and grandchildren, Gregory, 3, and Katie, 1, to flee Rodney's home. They sought higher ground in Lillard's home at the base of a mountain. But to their astonishment...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

2 'Putting Food First' project illustrates abundance of food Did you know that one American farmer feeds 129 other people? Or did you realize that the average American family spends only 11 percent of its take-home pay on food? To make consumers more aware of the abundance of high-quality, inexpensive food in America, Farm Bureau sponsored a unique program June 21 entitled "Putting Food First." The project was held simultaneously at Food Lion grocery stores in seven Virginia localities. Volunteers from the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee and county Farm Bureau Women's Committees spent the afternoon at these seven grocery stores educating consumers about agriculture. At each location, baskets of groceries were divided into food and non-food items from two unsuspecting shoppers. Then, the food items were purchased by Farm Bureau. The purpose was to illustrate that much of a consumer's grocery bill goes for non-food items and that real food costs are surprisingly low....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 When disaster struck, Farm Bureau members pulled together Disaster struck the farming community in Madison and 16 other Virginia counties during the last week of June. Some of our members lost virtually everything they owned as ravaging flood waters raged out of control along the eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains and in the hilly Piedmont terrain. Eight people lost their lives, a number of residents were stranded and had to be rescued by helicopter. Cattle and other livestock washed away. Large hay bales floated like buoys in the ocean. Mobile homes and other houses were washed from their foundations. Rivers changed course. Roads disappeared. Mud and river silt covered hundreds of acres of corn fields and pasture land. Tobacco and wheat crops were destroyed. Hundreds of miles of fencing was toppled and covered by mud, silt and debris washed in by the powerful flood waters. Cattle roamed freely. Half of Madison County s farm land was damaged. More than $6 million...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

4 Christian Farmers chapter formed More than 150 people met at a park near Amelia, Va., on July 8, to form the first Virginia Chapter of the Fellowship of Christian Farmers, International. Virginia is the 27th state to establish an FCF chapter. There are also chapters in Australia and Canada. Led by dairyman Douglas B. Child of Brodnax, the group gathered for a pig picking and program. Wilson Lippy of Hampstead, Md., immediate past president of the international organization, told the crowd that the purpose of the FCF is to build, maintain and strengthen faith in God for the farmer, the farm family, and the farming industry by presenting Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. He said that active chapters set up booths at agricultural expositions, fairs and farm shows. Most also hold an annual outreach dinner and other events. The FCF also has sent working mission teams to foreign countries and given on-site help in flood damaged areas of the U.S. The group heard testimonies from Child, Cu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 Continue color indoors after hint of first frost The upcoming frosts do not have to bring to an end the pleasures you get from flowering plants. Some floral favorites easily switch to inside environments. Others need to be planted from seed soon to unfold splashes of color indoors in fall and winter. Salvage Some If you have flowering plants outdoors in hanging baskets and containers, it's simpler to bring them in. Start moving potted flowers indoors when the temperature consistently drops below 55 degrees at night. Place the plants where they will receive sunlight equivalent to what they received out-of-doors, if at all possible. Check for insect pests hidden in the foliage or soil. Clear up any pest problems before they come inside. Begonias, coleus, impatiens and gera niums are easy to maintain indoors in a bright location. Even petunias can be kept inside if given a south-facing window. If you have any of these plants in good shape in garden beds, you can transplant ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

6 Farm Bureau offers fencing at below cost; donations being accepted The June flooding in Madison, Rockbridge and 15 other Virginia counties caused major fencing damage to many farmers. Because of the excessive damage, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation is offering fencing supplies at or below cost to producer members in these affected areas. A mile of 15 1/2-gauge barbed wire fencing is estimated to cost $1,400. Hightensile smooth wire will also be available. The Farm Bureau is asking for monetary contributions to offset the fencing costs for members even further. Individuals or county Farm Bureaus wishing to contribute to a special fencing fund should make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau Disaster Fund. Mail your donation to 12580 West Creek Parkway, Richmond, VA, 23238 and mark the envelope "Disaster Fund." The fencing project will last until Sept. 30. Orders will be accepted until then. "The proceeds collected through the fund will be distributed among those members who o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 Mold infection brought here from other states (Continued from Page 1) enough to dry them sufficiently, McPeters said. Rain was excessive in June. Normal rainfall in June in Southside Virginia is about five inches, but 22 inches fell this June, McPeters noted. Halifax and Pittsylvania counties are the state's largest producers of flue-cured tobacco. Tobacco farmer James Childrey of Halifax County said his farm had eight inches of rain in one night in June. Thick woods surround one of his tobacco fields on three sides and prevented wind circulation, resulting in blue mold and target spot infections on the same plants. Eventually, target spot consumed blue mold-infected tissue, thus destroying much of his crop. "We wouldn't have much of a blue mold problem if farmers in Virginia wouldn't buy transplants from other states. 99 Childrey didn't use the fungicide Ridomil on his crop at planting time, and because of that, he was unable to use Ridomil later in the season. He said ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

8 Madison farm family 'lucky to be alive' (Continued from Page 1) If they had dared to look out a window, they would have seen their car, truck and hay baler wash 75 yards down the hill and out to a cornfield. Some 60 hogs were swept down the mountainside and out into the cornfield. Some either drowned or died of injuries immediately. Afew hogs died while trapped beneath logs and timber from the hog finishing house. Other buildings destroyed during the slide were: a faring building, corn crib, a shed for sows, a small storage building for honey bee supplies, an old granary used for tool storage and a newly constructed shop. A metal grain bin was damaged when the slide tipped it sideways. An hour and a half passed between the two slides. Heavy rain and rumbling thunder continued. Hogs sought refuge beneath the house and with each flash of lightning, the hogs squealed in unison. A wing of the house containing the kitchen began to move. "We could hear the kitchen tearing loose from the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 Bridges, farms of Madison County severely damaged (Continued from Page 1) killed nearly 70 of their 200 hogs at their farm in the Graves Mill community. A few days after the flood, Lillard and his wife walked among the ruins of their farm, which resembled a war zone. "It will never be the same," Lillard lamented. Crumpled sheet metal from buildings lay scattered across what used to be a cornfield. Broken boards dotted the field. A breeze carried the stench of several dead hogs still to be buried. Boulders from the mountain now covered every inch of ground around their battered house. Hardwood trees, which stood tall on the mountainside the week before, were now stripped of bark as they lay atop piles of boulders. Mrs. Lillard was postmaster at the Graves Mountain post office, which washed away in the Rapidan River. The safe was all that remained of the one-room building. High water damaged about half of Madison County's 30,000 acres of cropland, Jarvis said. It destroyed...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

10 Supreme Court upholds endangered species act WASHINGTON—If you can't win in court, change the law. That's the reaction erf" the American Farm Bureau Federation to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision June 29th to uphold past interpretations of the 1973 Endangered Species Act. By a 6-3 vote, the court ruled the law does allow the government to ban destruction of natural habitats of threatened or endangered species, even if it infringes on private property rights and values. "It points out that there's a real need Americans want to keep farm programs A nationwide poll found 61 percent of Americans oppose slashing farm program funding during the current battle to decrease the deficit. Conducted by the Wirthin Group of McLean, the poll indicates 75 percent of Americans want a farm policy that uses tax dollars to ensure that the nation has a safe, plentiful and inexpensive food supply. The results also showed that women are more likely to oppose farm cuts than men. The poll also found th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 Farm income may decline The U.S. net farm income is forecast to drop in 1995, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report. Net farm income is expected to reach between $38 billion and $48 billion this year. In 1994, U.S. farm income totaled a near-record $50 billion, according to USDA's Agriculture Income and Finance summary report. In 1995, net cash income is expected to reach between $48 billion and $58 billion— last year, income totaled $54 billion. USDA predicts that cash receipts for both years could reach record levels due to high international and domestic food and fiber demands. Government payments are predicted to reach approximately 4 percent of gross cash income in 1994 and 1995. For the past four years, payments totaled 5 percent. In addition, farm production expenses are expected to rise in 1995 from $164 billion last year to between $162 billion and $170 billion in 1995. "HEAVY BREED" SPECIAL! Get big Reds, big Buff White Rocks, & huge ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

12 State delegates to tour Va. farms The Virginia House of Delegates Agriculture Committee will meet Aug. 30-31 to learn more about agriculture in the Commonwealth as well as tour farms in Orange and Madison counties. About 20 delegates have signed up for the meeting at Graves Mountain Lodge in Madison County. Delegates may see flood-damaged parts of Madison County. AUCTION EXECUTORS SALE SAM R. SAYERS ESTATE 600± ACRES SUBDIVIDED MAX MEADOWS-WYTHE COUNTY, VA. Near Ft. Chiswell Interchange 1-81 and 1-77 Sat., Sept. 2 ,10:30 a.m. Tracts will range in size from 5 to 230 AcresBid on part or all Border picturesque Reed Creek for over \ mile with 165± acres in fertile bottom land, balance in prime grazing. Numerous sites for homes with excellent views—located in an area with unlimited growth potential near one of Virginia's most prominent interchanges. A.A. Campbell—Thomas G. Hodges Co-Executors For details, or brochure with map and pictures, contact Selling Agents, Phone: 703-228-4131. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined SeptyOct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline fo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

14 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 13) WANTED —locust fence posts, need many Cal 703-347-9373 after 6 p.m. SHOEBOX CAKE RECIPE — $4, S.A.S.E.: Boxholder, P.O. Box 67, Scottsburg, Va. 24589. WILLIAMSBURG — free getaway! Send S.A.S.E., to: Mr. Edwards, 1200 South England Street, Williamsburg, Va. 23185. LOOKING FOR—tanning bed, reasonable. Cal 804-394-2218 or 804-394-9745. WANTED—oId antique clocks, wooden or brass, works, any condition. Call 703-774-4236. Aug. 6-12: Mountain Ecology Conference, Southwest Virginia 4-H Educational Center, Abingdon. Contact Barry Fox, 804-524-5848. Aug. 9: Senior Bull Delivery, Red House. Contact Ike Eller, 703-231-5252. I 1 Aug. 10: Virginia Corn & Soybean Expo, Charles City County. Contact Dave Ottaway, 804-379-2099. Aug. 10: Southwest Virginia Agricultural Research and Extension Center burley tobacco field day, Glade Spring. Contact the center at 703-944-3668. Aug. 12: Virginia Simmental State Field Day, Rural Retreat. Contact Ike...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

August 1995 Corn acreage reaches a record low in Virginia RICHMOND—SeveraI factors have led Virginia farmers to plant the smallest corn crop on record this year. An estimated 450,000 acres of corn has been planted in 1995,10 percent less than the 500,000 acres planted last year, according to a report by the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. That's the smallest amount of acreage devoted to corn since estimates began in 1926. "We've been anticipating the drop for several reasons," said James Lawson, deputy state statistician with VASS. "The biggest (reason) is the replacement of corn acres Sheep checkoff beqinninq BLACKSBURG—Governor Allen has signed legisla- tion allowing sheep producers to assess themselves to pay for a new promotion and research program. One key goal will be to curb a growing predator problem. The "sheep checkoff began July 1, and started at 50 cents a head for all sheep and lambs sold in Virginia. A provision allows for an increase of 10 cents a year up to...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1995

And You Can Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. r ■ 1 ■ % T The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products of Thgon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary ■Jg* | 1 M\ Ml health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Service Corpo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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