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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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"Alkali." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

"Alkali." Editors Press:—l wish some of your scientific correspondents would give us farmers the meaning of the word " alkali," as used in California and elsewhere on the Pacific coast. "Alkali" blinds our eyes, stuffs our noses, and chokes up our throats, as the railroad cars whirl us over the alkaline deserts that border on our Stato. It impregnates much of the water wo drink, giving it the quality of going down "slick," and it appears as a white saline incrustation on somo of the land we till. But although so universally visible, all the explanation one gets, on inquiry as to Avhat " alkali " is, is that " it's alkali." My smattering of chemistry teaches me that an alkali is something that combines with an acid to form a " salt;" potash, soda and ammonia being familiar examples. By the way, this last is an article of prieoless value to the farmer's manure heap, and unless tenderly cared for is apt to rosolvo itself into "airy nothingness;" it is distinguished as " the volatile al...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Cochineal of California—Its Production. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Cochineal of California—Its Production. Editors Press:—ln the Country Gentleman of March 30th, there is an article by a Californian upon tho adaptability of our soil and climate to the growth of the Cactus Opuntia. for cochineal purposes. The writer has a correct idea about tho wonderful resources of this State in regard to the small valuable products; and it is to be hopod some of our culturists will turn their attention to the cultivation of such products. There is no doubt that the healthful sections of Southern California afford tho very best opportunity for the successful growth of cactus, olive, and other valuable productions of this class. The manufacture of choice and expensive oils should also bo considered. Other branches of industry should also be opened as an inducement to the manufacturing migration—that class which understands how to use our opulent resources. Our capitalists should take a more active interest in such matters. It is a subject of gratitude that East...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Protecting Trees from Grasshoppers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Protecting Trees from Grasshoppers. Editors Press: —I wish to call the attention of your readers to a means of protecting trees from the ravages of jumping grasshoppers —those which fly it will, of course, not answer for—but in many parts of this State, Nevada, Colorado and Utah, they collect together in bands as the feed dries up, when they are from a half to over an inch long, and destroy every green thing that comes in their way, as they did last year in Yolo County, and the year bofore down hero. On their appearance here, my brother having a nice garden of 1% acres, had it about all destroyed in two or three hours, on the first day of May, whilst he was on a visit to the village near by. On his return to his house he found two pear trees imharmed still, and went to work to devise some way to save them. After a variety of experiments, he at last put a piece of flat tin around the tree, cutting a hole in the center just large enough for the body of the tree, and a slit cut out fro...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Dogs vs. Sheep. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Dogs vs. Sheep. If there is any greater nuisance in a farming community than dogs, such as are generally kept, I am unable to name it. In the county where I live there are many farmers who would keep a few sheep for there own use, and good sheep too, if it were not for the worthless, prowling dogs of the county, killing them as fast as brought here. The State would be thousands of dollars richer every year if our farmers could keep sheep without having to send them miles away to a sheep-raiser that keeps a watcher with the flock all the time, and pays him a big price, when, but for the nuisance complained of, they might keep them at home. A man who keeps a worthless dog to prowl through a neighborhood is neither a good Christian nor a good neighbor; for he does not do as he would be done by. A well trained terrier is the only kind of a dog that is useful to farmers in general. The wire-haired terrier, an ugly looking dog, but a great enemy to rats and mice, is the best I know of, an...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Public Lands. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Public Lands. The question of land grants is being agitated in a very lively manner. The matter of grants to railroad corporations is made prominent, and is even becoming a political qxiestion. That it should enter into politics, we are sorry to see, for, important as it is, when once made a partizan affair, it will be treated as one's interests dictate, and not with the spirit of fairness which it ought to have. Senator Stewart, of Nevada, has sent us a copy of his speech on the subject, delivered before the IT. S. Senate on the 3d ult. It is certainly a most able argument, and advocates the distribution of land in small quantities. It likewise advocates the railroad grant system with ability. With this we also agree—to a certain extent. But to give the railroads unlimited amounts, is contrary to our ideas. Give them enough to aid them and to secure construction of roads, but be judicious and careful in such gifts. We append a few extracts from the senator's speech, as follows:...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Right Words from the Right Source. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Right Words from the Right Source. We find tbo following seasonable advice from the San Jose Mercury and commend it to the careful perusal of every reader of the Rural: An intelligent farmer of this county remarked to the writer, a few days ago, while discussing the all-prevailing topic of another dry season: —"If onecould live on climate alone California, would be the finest country in the world." He, like most of our farmers is, or has been, a large graingrower, depending upon that industry al most exclusively; and like most of our farmers also, especially those of the valley, has, of late years, hadhis upi and downs, struggling with an exhausted soil and dry seasons. We concede that there are difficulties in the way of restoring worn-out lands, in this country, not experienced in the east. For instance, there the use of clover is the great restorative; but here all grasses are annuals, hence clover will not attain a sufficient growth to be made available within the time when it m...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Crop That Never Fails. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

A Crop That Never Fails. It has been remarked that the grape crop of California has never been known to have been a failure. Wet seasons or dry seasons and every season it has done so well as scarcely to cause complaint. This fact is an important one, and it cannot be to forcibly pressed upon public attention. As henceforth we shall have a fair paying, if not indeed a very profitable and lucrative market for all the grapes we can raise or for their ability to withstand both wet and dry seasons and to yield well, whichever may come, is of much importance. It is true that means are required to bring a vineyard into bearing, but what farmer among us that could not if so determined, plant rive or ten acres in grape vines each Spring, until his vinyard has grown as large us he desires it to be? The third year after planting it will yield something, and thenceforth the early-planted portion of the vineyard will produce profit enough to extend it gradually at the rate of live, ten or twent...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Percheron Horse. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Percheron Horse. Eorroßfl Bcbal Fbbw: —I see by a recent reference to tho importation of ft Percheron or Norman horse, by Mr. W. C. Myer, of Oregon, that you are laboring under the impression that the animal mentioned was the first importation of that blood on tho Pacific coast. In that you are very much mistaken, as in tho year 1805 I brought to this State a three year old Norman colt. This colt was brought from Iroquis county, 111., and is now eight years old. This horso, "Young ltawley," hits stood four seasons in Petaluma, where he is now making the season. Ho took tho first premium at tho State Fair for the years 1868 and IS(S(J. And at tho Bur District Fair, San Franoiaoo, in 1870; also a two year old colt of his, Young liawley, Jr., took tho first premium at the liay District Fair. All the above premiums were awarded as the best hone for draft purposes. Young ltawley is a ooal black; stands 17 hands high and weighs 1,660 ft)B, He is of fine appearance, a olean head, v gra...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GARDENING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

GARDENING.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Gardening near San Jose.—Practical Experience. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Gardening near San Jose.—Practical Experience. Editoks BCBAXi ritKss;— I propose, to give your renders some of my experience* in gardening in California, an occupation which I have now followed for tho past eighteen years, at a point about six miles north of San Jose. I came to Ban Jose* in 1852, sick and flat broke, and commenced farming the next year. I toiled along over two years, sometimes with plenty of money and sometimes with scarcely any; but always at the end of every year, gaining something, either in money or knowledge. I will give the history of a single twentyacre piece of land, and will not passjner its boundary until I come down to 1871. In 1864, which was the year of the great drouth here, so soon as I found my grain all failing I turned to something else—l went to work sinking an artesian well, and was unfortunate to a certain extent; even the workmen that I had hired tried to dis- nude me, for, said they, perseverance has killed many a man. Some of them even refuse...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hints to Farmers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Hints to Farmers. Editors Pbbss: —Every person -who settles upon a piece of tillable land can soon furnish his farm lot with all the durable fence posti he may wish for, by commencing to drill in locust seed, and raising np n forest of trees. The yellow locust is considered the best for timber; it is rapid in its growth, coming to a ■offloient size for use in live yean. This kind of timber for wagon hubs cannot be surpassed by any other wood; and for posts to be set in the ground it is equal to any other timber. It is as durable as cedar. Betide*, it makes I fine ornamental shade tree, free from insects; and when in full bloom its large, attractive flowers yield an aroma very fragrant, and pleating to the sense of smell. There is no better wood for fuel, no timber more profitable to cultivate; than the locust tree. The seed is easily obtained, and when ready to plant, should first receive a dash of scalding hot water, and then remain in tepid warm water one or two dayt previous to p...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. It may now be considered a sottlod fact that a season of very short crops is upon us. In the early part of tho season the cold, frosty nights so kept back the grain, that tho then favorablo condition of the soil failed to produce the usual extent of growth; and when tho later, dessicating north winds swept over tho State, the limited moisture then in tho ground was so far taken up from tho surface soil that the moro improved weather which followed, also failed to produoe tho growth usually resulting from such a favorablo atmospheric condition. In veiw of these facts the tone of many of tho interior papers is despondent, and both wheat and barley have gono up to an altogether unwarranted figure. Wo havo taken some considerable pains to glean and collate from our exchanges, observations and private letters, such facts as seem to givo a fair estimate of the situation. As a result wo find that there is no doubt of a full crop being realized in the norther...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Cherries and Gooseberries, etc., the first of the season, have made their appearance in the market during the past week. Of cherries, three lots have been received, selling at $1.25, 75c and 50c, closing yesterday at 75c. Of gooseberries, the first lot sold at 18c. The receipts of strawberries during the week have been steadily on the increase, aggregating 180,000 lbs., or an average of 30,000 lbs. for each day, the price meanwhile dropping from 10@15c to 6(w7c. On Monday, the receipts were 40,---000 lbs, and on Tuesday, 50,000 lbs. The trains of Wednesday morning brought 27,---500 tbs. strawberries, which found a ready market at 6@7c for choice in baskets. Cotton Planting. — Messrs. Strong, Peck & Co., says the San Joaquin Valley Argus, commenced planting cotton on the Buckley Brothers' ranch near Hopeton on the 26th ult. They are in receipt of several tons of seed by rail from Alabama and Mississippi of the most approved varieties, and will thoroughly test the question...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS & INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

PATENTS & INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Fbom Official Rk.powts to DEWEY & CO., V. S. ane Foukion Patent Agents, ani> Pi'i-.lishers of the Scientific PbUl.] For the Week Ending April 18th. Amalgamating Pan roB Gold and Silver Ores. —Ira S. Porke, Virginia City, Nevada. Note.—Copies of V. S. and Foreign Patents furnished by Dewex Co., in the shortest time possible (by telegraph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent business for Pacific coast inventors transacted with greater security and in much less time than by any other agency.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notices of Recent Patents. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Notices of Recent Patents. Among the patents recently obtained through Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press American and Foreign Patent Agency, the following are worthy of mention : Metallic Wheel. —J. H. Harris, S. F. This improvement iii metallic wheels consists in making the wheel with sheet or plate iron sides, which extend from the hub to the rim, leaving a hollow space between them, thus forming a metallic box wheel suitable more particularly for use as bearing wheels for gang plows, and presenting the advantage of having no spokes or projecting parts to gather mud or dirt, but scouring and freeing itself continually. For the proper construction of this whoul, a tire and a hub of peculiar make are required, which comprise part of the invention. The advantage of the device will be felt in moving over loose or wet land, but more especially where the ground is a stiff adobe, as in California. The wheel is strong and durable and can be easily and cheaply constructed. Roller ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Tite Healthiest Cocntiiy in the Would. De Bow's mortality statistics show that the people of the "United States are the healthiest of the globe. The deaths are three hundred and twenty thousand per year, or one and one-third per cent, of the population. —In England the ratio is oveitwo per cent, and in France nearly three per cent. Virginia and North Carolina are the healthiest of the States, and have 638 inhabitants over 100 years of age. Lewis River. —We learn that recently a dozen or more families have gone into the Lewis river neighborhood for the purpose of procuring farms and to settle. The prospect of the Northern Pacific Railroad being completed through this region within the next two or three years, is having v very stimulating effect in settling up th<hitherto unoccupied laud along the north bank of the Columbia and along its tributaries. — Oregonian. Sorrow conies soon enough without despondency ; it does a man no good to carry around a lightning rod to attract...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wilcox's Improved Steam Water Lifter. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Wilcox's Improved Steam Water Lifter. The present dry season appears to have drawn very general attention, throughout all the agricultural portions of tho State, liable to suffer from drouth, to tho necessity of providing some means, which may bo always at hand for irrigation when needed, in localities beyond the reach of ditches or other river supply of water, or artesian wells. "Windmills are largely resorted to; but their aid, at best, is only very limitod; and a cheap and reliable steam-pump has often been considered a great desideratum. The large cost of such an appliance, however, and the necessitated intervention of a steam engine, with all its intricacies, as a medium of applying the power of the steam to tho pump, has heretofore been considered an almost insurmountable barrier to the employment of such power. We are enabled, however, to present herewith an illustration of a steam apparatus which will accomplish the end desir- Ed, without engine, piston or plunger, and one w...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Oroville Bridge. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Oroville Bridge. Butte county has just oompleted a contract with the Pacific Bridge Company, of Oakland to put a bridge ovor Feather river at Oroville. It consists of two main spans, one of 178 feet and tho other of two hundred and twenty-eight feet. This last will probably be the longest §pan yet built on tho coast. It is to be constructed throughout on the Smith Patent Truss Plan, which we illustrated and described in full in a previous number of the Fkess, and which is rapidly coining into favor. The truss is twenty-one feet high and twenty-two feet wide, with double roadways. Tho piers are constructed of cast iron. on Smith's improved plan. Cylinders, 4 feet 6 inches in diameter, are sunk to bed rock and tilled with concrete. These are braced, so that tho two forming a pier act perfectly together. For rapid currents this plan of pier will undoubtedly become very popular, and it is quite as durable jin most places as stone. The whole .superstructure is placed over forty feet ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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