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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

368 Tun Indian Advocatk. curred in a Lawton restaurant recently. The Indian, a man of mature years, entered the restaurant and took his seat at the table. He was dressed like a white man and was an intelligent-looking man. But he seemed nervous and ill at ease, and appeared to be undecided about something. This was noticed by parties present, who attributed it to a want of familiarity with the white man's table manners. Finally he won a moral victory over himself. Raising his hands above the table he said to those present, "Me Jesus man," and pro- ' f ceeded to ask God's blessing on the food before him. Thkri: is, says the Canadian Afcsscu&er, talk of an inter national convention to suppress anarchy. It will be curious to know at what particular stage of the king-killing malady the governments will take the anarchist in hand, and then what kind of treatment they will adopt. Leo XIII, without the aid of conventions, has given the true answer to this great and ever-growing difficu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

The Indian Advocate. ' 369 sand Catholic Indian children in our mission schools, and it requires about one hundred and forty thousand dollars an nually to maintain them. This is about seventy dollars per capita. A modest sum, indeed, when we think that it costs about twice that amount for some of our white children not even belonging to moderate homes. The economy of the sit uation is, therefore, of easy comprehension. Now we have this very simple proposition to meet. Either that sum must be raised or the faith of the Indian child must be jeopardized by having its Catholic school closed and the pupils given over to the godless education of the Government. It is for the Catholics of the country to decide which shall be the result. If the former, then we must be more generous in our contri butions to the cause. If the latter, then what we now give will be ample for the purpose. The Indian Advocate is about to enter on its fourteenth year, during which time its readers can judge of wha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

37 Tin: Indian Advocate. fV i ' not ask you to continue to be a friend and helper, as you have proved yourself this in the past, but I will ask, and I am sure not in vain, that you will send, as a helping hand, one more subscriber. You surely have one friend who will hearken to your appeal in the Advocate's behalf; or should you wish to make a present worthy of a dear friend, send him the Advo cate for a year it will not only come as a once-a-year re minder of your friendship, but a monthly, and will it not also bring upon yourself that reward which our Blessed Lord has promised for even a cup of water given for sweet charity's sake? We wish you all the joys of the coming holy season. o o a$ o5 A HUMBLE APOSTLE. A Christmas Story. She sat in the long drawing-room alone. Twice be reaved since last Christmas morning had shone upon her a happy wife and mother, her heart seemed stunned and cold, her soul unresponsive to any call of friendship or affection. She had no religion, this prou...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Tun Indian Auvocati:. 371 needs or sorrows. To her, they were mere machines, not capable of feeling or suffering deeply, truth to tell, she scarcely thought of them at all in such a connection. Grate ful for her kindness, they were not aware of this deficiency in her conduct towards them, and in the heart of one in particu lar (the stout, good-natured, pious Irish cook, Mary Ma loney) the deep and hopeless grief.of her mistress had touched a responsive chord, of which the worldly soul of that mistress would have been surprised to know the existence. For Mary Maloney had also been a wife and mother, and in one short year Providence had bereaved her of a comfortable home, a kind husband and a beautiful child, whose loss she never ceased to bemoan in the solitude of lonely nights and days of hard, unceasing toil. But her sorrow was tempered by the thought that for one of her treasures, at least, Heaven had opened its golden doors before he could have tasted the apple of the knowledge o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

372 Tin: Indian Advouati:. his way up by this it'll be a great comfort to some one or an other, an' there's no denyin' they do be a bit lonesome about Christmas, bein' neither here with them they left behind, nor there where they're longin' to rest, in life everlastin'." On this particular occasion the memory of her kind mas ter was strong upon her, and she felt an impulse to have a mass said for him specially, although she knew that he had died as he had lived a respectable, kind-hearted heathen', at peace with the world and his own conscience. What ensued was not anticipated by the good creature, but followed directly upon he charitable resolution, which must prove to any reader, hnwwpr nriiiH5r.iiH. that hr tirrmlv and Christian nur- pose found favor, and that at once, with Almighty God. jf It was three days before Christmas, and Mrs. Dinsmore sat, as I have said before, alone in the seclusion of her drawing-room, her hands idly folded, gazing absently into the fire, while from t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Thk Indian Advocatk. 373 slipped a note into each. Oh, Mary! I cannot! 1 cannot! Do not neglect anything, but spare me all such work this Christinas." Tears rose to the eyes of the faithful servant and rolled down her rosy cheeks, seamed and lined as they were from long bending over the kitchen range. "Don't take on so, ma'am," she replied, soothingly. "Sure,we'll be glad to do it. Indeed, ma'am, I remember well the darlint an' his tiny hands full of cookies he stole from the jar to give to the crip ples, an' the master och! there never was a kinder man nor a better provider." Then, forgetting the distance that lay between herself and her mistress, a distance which she had never been encouraged and never before endeavored to over step, and conscious only that here, too, was another woman who had lived and loved and suffered, she gave vent to all the pent-up emotion of her honest Irish heart. "Oh, then, it's I that can feel for you, ma'am, for I've been through it all my self. I had ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

zl 374 Thk Indian Advocaix. thy and consolation which, in the depth and secrecy of her sorrow, she had hitherto repelled from all who ventured to touch its sacredness, she cried out: "Come here, Mary; sit down beside me and tell me how you have -borne it how I can bear it." Without a word of protest Mary sat down as she was bidden on a fautcuil close to the chair of her mistress, and leaning forward touched with her hard and discolored hand the white fingers of that other woman, bereaved, but without hope or consolation. "'Tis fifteen years," she said, simply, "since I laid them side by side in the graveyard beyant. On a cold, snowy day the little one went, an' my heart well nigh broke to lave him there, though I well knew 'twas only the shell that his spirit was above. I'm not tellin' ye a lie, ma'am; believe me when I'm sayin' it, that there's never a day dawned or ended since but I've cried hot tears, an' will till the one I die. But I've prayed, ma'am, day in an' day out, an' th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Thk Indian Auvocati: 375 "Yes, ma'am, I can," was the reply. "Not with the best, of course, for I was but a slip of a girl when I came to America, an' we were too large an' growin' a family to lave any of us long at the books. But I went for a long time to the night class at the Sisters of Notre Dame, an' I learnt a good many things there." "And have you a Bible? Do they allow you to read it?" "Sure I have, ma'am. Denny and I bought it in monthly parts: 'twas just paid for when he died. I have it in my trunk: it's beautifully bound." "But you do not read it you are not allowed to?" "No, 1 can't say that I read it often, ma'am; 'tis too bulky: but I does sometimes. It isn't true Catholics aren't allowed to read it. We can if we like, but we don't each one -take our own meanin' out of it as the Protestants do. We have it explained to us in other books,-an' by them that knows it well. I've learned a great deal about it from the afternoon sermons at the Cathedral." "You are a good soul,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

376 The Indian Advocate. sj I'd not put that out my religion if I was makin' a new one God forbid! whatever I'd do." "What does it say in the Bible about praying for the r dead, and where is it?" "In the book of the Machabees, ma'am. It is a holy and if wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be $t loosed from their sins." "That seems very clear. You make me feel interested. ' Oh, that I could believe like you!" ,: "For that you have only to ask the grace of faith. You can get it by prayer, ma'am, and only that way. Sure, 'twould be no harm to try, ma'am." Mrs. Dinsmore smiled faintly as she replied: "And you pray for your dead husband still?" "Daily, ma'am. 'Tis as natural for me as my breakfast. If he doesn't need it, some other poor soul may. And if I may make so bold as to tell you, I've had a mass said a short time back for the master." "A mass? That is what the priest says every day, is it not?" "Yes," replied Mary. "You'll find that in your own Bible, too. 'From...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Tin: Indian Advocatk. 377 done nothin' at all but one thing that I daren't tell ye now, but spme day, with God's help, I hope I may. But you trust in Him, bow to His holy will, and you'll feel yourself to be a new woman. God and Our Lady will do the rest." Here Mrs. Dinsmore interrupted her. "Mary, will you lend me your Bible? I am ashamed to say it, but I have none of my own." Mary hesitated a moment. Suddenly a light thought ft struck her. "I will, ma'am," she replied, "if you would like to see it; but it's a very cumbersome book, and you couldn't well handle it. But I have a small one of your own kind, that a Protestant lady I lived with wonst gave me, and I didn't like to refuse her. I've often read a bit in it, for Father Jeffros, at the college, told me the difference was so little that it didn't hurt, and a good book is always a good book, he says." "Thank you; fetch it to me this afternoon. My head is aching so badly that I must lie down awhile." And so they parted, the one ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

I "ft 378 Thk Indian Advocatk. new light and a new hope in living, with such fervor and per sistence that the petition soon was its own answer, and Mrs. Dinsmore became a fervent Catholic. Her joy was further increased by the revelation made to her at the proper time that her beloved child had been baptized before his death by the devoted Mary; to her own knowledge her husband had received the Sacrament in infancy; therefore her prayers for him were full of hope and confidence. Devout, wide-reaching in her charities, especially at Christmas time, one can easily divine why, above all things else, she is so devoted to the Souls in Purgatory. a& a a o BENEDICTINE NOTES. Italy The Rt. Rev. D. Theodore Cappelli. Abbot of 'the Monastery of St. Juliano D'Albaro, in Genoa, has been elected Abbot Visitor for the Italian Province of the.Cassinese Congregation of the Primitive Observance, to take the place of Rt. Rev. Father D. Maura Serafini. O. S. B., who was elected, one year ago, Abbot...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Tin: Indian Advocatk. 379 Spain Our flourishing Benedictine Spanish Province has just begun, under the best auspices, a foundation which will be another proof of the usefulness in our times of the Monastic Orders, and will serve to show to the people of the world that the Benedictines in particular deserve well of society and they are worthy of protection. Mgr. Raimondo Riu ed Calbanas, titular Bishop of Samos and Admin istrator Apostolic of Solsona (Province of Lerida), a man recommendable by his great zeal and learning, wrote to the Rt. Rev. Abbot Visitor of Mont serrat, telling him he wanted to have the Benedictines in his diocese, and that he would allow them to take charge of the celebrated Sanctuary of Our Lady of the Miracle, situated in the town of Riner, and would donate them a large tract of land around the Sanctuary, to erect there a Benedictine Monastery and an agricultural college. The generous offer was accepted .by the Benedictines after mature de liberation, and on t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

38o Tur, Indian Adyocatk. the purchase of a certain ground situated on a plateau of Mount Olivet, commanding an extensive view of the valley of Cedron. Now, our Holy Father the Pope, Leo XIII. acceding, with all his heart, to the desires of the Patriarch of the Syrians, and of our Rt. Rev. Father Abbot General, has ordered, by decree of the 26th of last August, that on the above ground a Benedictine Monastery shall be erected, with an annexed Syrian Seminary, and he has entrusted the care of it to the Congregation of the Primitive Ob servance. Very Rev. D. Benedict Gariador, O. S. B., Prior of Kerbeneat, has been appointed Superior of this nascent community. The following are the present members under his charge: Revs. D. Bernard Drouhin, D. Theodore Andrieux, D. Anthony Gaillot, D. Raphael Ardans and Bro. Raphael. United Slates Sacred Heart, Okla. : Bro. Edward Laco, O. S. B., pronounced his perpetual-vows on November 13th, Feast of All Saints of our Order. St. Meinrad, Ind.: The R...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

The Indian Advocatk. 38i 4 ii LOCALS 4 5p A merry Christmas and a happy New Year to all. The Advocate wishes to thank its old (as well as new) advertising patrons for favors extended, and wishes them a prosperous business year. A force of workmen is busily engaged in putting the finishing touches to our new Monastery. Weather permitting, it will be ready for occu pancy by January 1. The Pottawatomie Indians of Sacred Heart and vicinity have decided to purchase the tract of land on which their cemetery has been located for the past twenty-five years and deed the same to Sacred Heart Mission for burial purposes for Catholic Indians. Thanksgiving was observed as a holiday in our schools. At 7:30 the boys' assisted at Holy Mass, after which the greater number, accompanied by the prefects, went hunting that sport most dear to the heart of every Indian. After dinner the boys all indulged in games on the campus, where candies were liberally distributed. The children of St. Mary's Academy g...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

382 The Indian Advocate. ST, BENEDICTS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL ; U ROLL OF HONOR. SENIORS. Hillerman, B; Scott, W. Turnbull, W. Harrison, F. W. Tierney, I De Graff,- I. Petfier, S. Wano, F. JUNIORS. Mulligan, J. Berry, S. B. r Helean, R.J' e Noel, H. ' Shapwakuck, J. Hejean, M. Zoeller, A. Owing to the nonarrival of paper (ordered from Chicago)', which has been delayed in shipment, we are compelled to omit our usual advertising in this issue, for which we crave the indulgence of our patrons, and will extend their time accordingly. Our paper will arrivef in time for pur January issue, and such omissions will be avoided in the future. I t l A; A v "

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

& Wmfwi IB 'Hi imHj Christmas Greeting to All,

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

r'y mwHwr' -,7l'iyyrjly y w 1 Vl -- V J1 h, m ft...r i Vol. XIV. V w( r r.-.jfr.4HML -.L Ihe Indian Aid vocate JANUARY, 1902. No. I C NEW YEAR. J -IT r 'Tis midnight's holy hour, and silence now Is brooding, like a gentle spirit, o'er The still and pulseless world. Hark! on the winds The bell's deep tones are swelling; 'tis the knell Of the departed year. Jo funeral train Is sweeping past: yet, on the stream and wood, With melancholy light, the moonbeams rest ff i Like a pale, spotless shroud; the air is stirred As by a mourners sigh; and, on yon cloud, $ ' That floats so still and placidly through heaven, The spirits of the seasons seem to stand. Young Spring, bright Summer", Autumn's solemn form, And Winter, with his aged locks and breath, In mournful cadence that come abroad Like the far wind-harp's wild and touching wail, A melancholy dirge o'er the dead year '' Gone from the earth forever. No Cr.s, mi Crown , J

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

pmnfff d f 3 The Indian Advocate. i j wl Beneath the Southern Cross. tt h" The sixteenth century havl seen the sway of the Spanish sceptre extend over boundless domains in the New World. Very much, however, remained to be done, if the converted Indians were to be kept from falling, back into barbarism and if the numerous Indian tribes, scattered over immense tracts of country, who were still heathens, weie to be converted to Christian civilization. The Yulers of Spain were convinced r )' that the Catholic Church alone could accomplish this gigantic ' work. They had cheerfully assisted the missionaries- and i I continued to do so for many decades of years. The Church, on the other hand, carried on this apostolic labor so success- fully that even the most savage of the native tribes grew gen tle and devout. Special blessing attended the labors of the Jesuits in the country of La Plata. The number of mission aries had grown very considerably in the first half of the sev- x -enteenth ce...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

'Vir'VrWi'l,V'' - rtf; P""i ,""" 'mv Thi: Indian Advocate. l " 4.i V M V r l til . tinians, Merciarii and Jesuits shared with one another the labors in this1 field. In the Province of Quito,, P. Fuentas, Procurator of the Jesuits, counted, as early as the year 1632, within his province, 213 towns inhabited by converted Indians, and 30 larger cities whose population consisted almost entirely of Indians. The best organized missions were situated in the prov inces of Paraguay and Buenos Ayres. They were from the beginning independent of the colonial government and were first designed to be mere places of refuge for the Indians, who x in. that country and in that time were yet generally heathens. But the gentle influence of the Church succeeded very quickly not only in converting these Indians, but in advancing them to a, high state of civilization and social prosperity. Thus . these settlements grew into Christian -republics, with almost absolute self-government, their dependence on. t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

Itswy 55fJ The Indian Advocate. -f, case' of a failure of crops he was supplied from the public granary. On the other hand, he surrendered his surplus in more favorable, years to-the public treasury. His claim to the .possession of his land, therefore, was not absolute, though, 'his usufruct was restricted only against abuse. At all events, the support of his family was assured and his labor certain of reward. Each community possessed large herds of cattle aud sheep. At stated times so many head of these were killed as were necessary for consumption. The meat ,vas distributed proportionately among the families. The bond of social union was strengthened by the public domain, which was cultivated by all in- common. The yield of these lands was devoted to the support of widows and orphans, of the sicA and aged, of the officials and the trades men. Another portion of these products was set aside for the support of the Church, for public improvements and un foreseen emergencies. Such a s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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