ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,070 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 Veggie hate crime bill to save Arizona's good name PHOENIX, Ariz.—Gov. Fife Symington signed a bill dubbed the "veggie hate crime bill" in April. The bill allows farmers and produce shippers to sue anyone who knowingly spread false information about Arizona farm products. Despite a lot of ribbing by the press, the governor defended the bill. There was concern that false rumors would ultimately destroy the good name of the state's commodities. Other states, including Florida, Louisiana, Idaho and Georgia have similar laws protecting their good name. China big cotton importer BEIJING, CHINA— The demand for cotton continues to outpace supply in China, according to traders and analysts. As a result, the world's most popular nation will continue to be a cotton importer for years. Chinese demand for imported cotton is expected to keep already elevated world cotton prices up. Analysts expect U.S. stocks to run out late this summer. This could put further pressure on the world cot...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

6 Careful flower handling leads to longest vase life Whether you grow your own bouquets or choose them from a florist's cooler, knowledge of some of the details concerning fresh flowers will help you select high quality blossoms for indoor color. Factors such as flower type and stage of development, time of harvest, and post harvest handling greatly affect the appearance and longevity of cut flowers. Flower type: Different types of flowers mature differently after cutting. The florets of spike flowers, such as gladiolus, snapdragons and delphiniums, open from the base to the top. They should be cut when the lowest flowers open and middle buds show color. Single flowers, like roses, peonies and tulips, continue to open after harvest. They last longest if cut when the buds are tightly closed, but showing color. Leave room in the arrangement for blossoms to open fully. Composite blooms are made up of many tiny flowers clustered together. They stop developing when cut. Chrysanthemums, d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 Chinese carp chomp away at wicked weeds By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist ETTRlCK—Chinese grass carp is the latest fish to frolic in Virginia ponds. But if s not likely to end up on anyone's dinner table. The grass carp is a revolutionary new way to organically control weeds in your farm pond, according to Dr. Brian Nerrie, a Virginia State University Extension Aquaculture Specialist Nerrie spoke to farm pond owners during an aquatic weed management seminar at the university's Randolph Farm in April. The new breed of fish can grow to 20 pounds and is generally too big to be eaten by bass, Nerrie said. The fish is helpful in controlling aquatic plants like hydrilla and duckweed that are problems on many Virginia farms. And the fish don't crowd ponds now that scientists have found a way to genetically alter the fish so that it does not reproduce, Nerrie said. "Because they'd eat up all of your aquatic plants, not only hydrilla and duckweed, a way needed...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

8 Dairy farming is a way of life; not a business June is dairy month. Farm Bureau News visits with member Fred Smith. With 700 cows, Smith and his family run one of Virginia's largest dairy operations. By LAURA FORTUNATO Farm Bureau News Acting Editor MCGAHEYSVILLE—The mid-day sunshine reflects off the large steal Lothian barn as Fred Smith and his two-year-old grandson greet a trio of black and white Holsteins. The first cow stops chomping on a corn and alfalfa mix, nudges her snout their way, then bellows a long moo-o-o-o. In minutes, hundreds of dairy cows follow suit in a serenade to their visitors. Luke Smith giggles as he waddles over to his grandfather and reaches for him. As they embrace, Smith smiles and says: "Running a dairy farm is a lifestyle, not a business." To outsiders, though, owning a dairy farm with more than 700 cows, heifers and calves is certainly a business. One of the largest dairy operations in the state, the Smith farm produces 43,000 pounds of milk daily....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 Dairy farming is a way of life. Fred Smith with his two-year-old grandson, Luke, granddaughter Allison and daughter, Lisa, on their daily afternoon visit to the barn. Family dairy farm competes in a world economy (Continued from Page 8) And with that, Smith moves on to another subject and another area of the farm It's a matter-of-fact state of mind in the milking barn. Lourdes, a Mexican immigrant, finishes with a herd. She makes her way through a long room that is filled with electrical wires and large milk bins. She stops briefly at each cow, pulling from their bellies a metal multi-tube milking contraption, then hoses them down. When she is done, she unlatches a steal gate. All the cows take one step forward and wait patiently to be herded out the door. "Cows are creatures of habit," Smith comments. "They do this everyday." Smith says he doesn't milk the cows anymore. He employs about 15 workers, many Mexican immigrants, who milk the cows and perform other farming funct...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

10 Glickman: '95 Farm Bill to become top priority WASHINGTON—Dan Glickman says he wants to be an "advocate for American agriculture" during his tenure at the agriculture department and will attempt to ensure continued economic competitiveness of American farmers and ranchers. The nine-term Kansas congressman was recently sworn in as President Clinton's second agriculture secretary. In an interview with the American Farm Bureau News, the new agriculture secretary commented on a variety of issues affecting American farmers. His priorities, he noted, include crafting a fair and comprehensive farm bill, continuing efforts to downsize U.S. Department of Agriculture and ensuring American farmers remain competitive in the international trade arena. Glickman noted that throughout the upcoming farm bill debate, one underlying theme will likely guide the discussions— shrinking federal budgets. He said federal farm programs work well and benefit all Americans at a low cost. Agriculture, Glickm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 Members' opinions needed to form Farm Bureau policy Farm Bureau policy is your policy. And if you want to help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that will affect you, take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire. The following questions relate to vital agricultural topics that affect farmers both directly and indirectly. Questionnaires will be used in forming policies that will be voiced in the Virginia General Assembly, Congress, and governmental agencies. How Policies Develop Farm Bureau's polity development program provides Farm Bureau producer members an opportunity to participate in the policy development process. These policies are the basis for Farm Bureau's beliefs and related activities. District Policy Development Meetings Held in each of Farm Bureau's seven field districts. Allow key county Farm Bureau leaders to bring state and national issues to the surface and to hear forecasts on issues that likely will be considered on the state and na...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

12 Survey shows those polled favor NAFTA WASHINGTON —A poll by Louis Harris and Associates shows nearly 48 percent of the people surveyed support the North American Free Trade Agreement, while 39 percent were opposed to the trade pact. Thirteen percent were unsure of where they stand on the matter. A similar poll conducted in December 1993 showed 51 percent favored NAFTA, with 41 percent against and 8 percent undecided. Both polls had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percent. The DR® FIELD and A /> BRUSH MOWER L±/' 1 „ - the amazing walk-behind brush cutter that - M M MESS^ H 'th • CLEARS & MAINTAINS meadows, """ i j hand-held pastures, roadsides, fences, wooded and I brushcutters rough non-lawn areas with ease. Mows Ar t * U2t are so • CUTS tall grass, weeds, brush, / slow and tiring brambles, sumac - even tough to use... OR with MULCHES PLEASE MAIL no DETAILS about the Amazing to trip over or to "like hand-held brushcutters and sicklebar mowers. PvES! Pl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline fo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

14 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 13) 10 EASIEST WAYS—to make part-time money. Send $24.95 to Liberty, P. O. box 31, King George, Va. 22485. (Moneyback guarantee.) SPECIAL MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA—64O pages, $25. C&N Enterprises, 721 Cabin Creek Drive, Hopewell, Va. 23860. PEACH BRANDY—or beer recipe, $2. S.A.S.E., to Collins, P. O. Box 365, Tasley, Va. 23441. WILLIAMSBURG —free getaway! Send S.A.S.E., to: Mr. Edwards, 1200 South England Street, Williamsburg, Va. 23185. FOR SALE—portable cement mber on wheeis.Cal 804-2934815. PORTLAND CUTTER —runabout with top, antique rally cart. Call 703-423-1215 for price, directions. FOUR DELICIOUS—German recipes, $2. S.A.S.E.: Dee, Route 1, Box 51, Bedford, Va. 24523. DO IT YOURSELF —last will kits, also resume its, $5 each. 703-429-2804. WANTED —used chain link, 10x6, dog lot in good condition. 804-448-2111. WANTED—OId U.S. coins and collections, gold, silver, high prices paid for nice coins. 703-967-2338. WATER HEATER—electri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 Cooking, cattle and camaraderie blend at Beef Expo By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist HARRISONBURG—There were Angus and Limousin in the corral and Beef Stir Fry and Beef Stroganoff in the kitchen And throughout the fairgrounds, vendors displayed everything from high-tech cattle equipment to tiny toy tractors. TTiey all came together for the Sixth Annual Virginia Beef Expo, which was held April 21-23 at the Rockingham County Fairgrounds. The premiere showcase event for the Virginia beef cattle industry brought out buyers, sellers, exhibitors and youngsters from the greater mid-Atlantic—and beyond. It was the more than 150 purebred cattle buyers and sellers, however, who continued to be the backbone of the show. "We have the best of all breeds," said the 1995 Virginia Beef Expo President Mary diZerega. The Expo did well this year. The average price for a purebred animal was $1,615, $10 above last year's average price. "The show has had good results the p...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

And You Can Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Heaitb Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. -j. T The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products ofTHgon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary M. I 1 I' ll health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Service Corporation is...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

• • • • ' Vol. 54, No. 6 VFBF breaks own membership record—again ■' oUf6iiy ti)o lIIU.UUv tt9inior tor t » lAOC of <f\i * member iMmiiii codh ofBB ™F3Dir^^Md^^T ery ' Uncertainty of peanut program worries producers By UNOA McNATT Special to the Farm Bureau News WINDSOR—James Holland's roots go much deeper into the sandy soil of Isle ofWight County than the roots of peanut vines just beginning to creep across fields near his home. But his roots and the roots of those vines are intertwined. I " - vtß* il( i m - ' jfft 1 &Lu UNOA MCNATT/SPEOAL PHOTO James and Ellen Holland stand near the peanuts planted in the fields surrounding their Isle of Wight County farmhouse. Published by The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Membership finals KIM mmmm 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 J V'.L rrn jj . . j , , | , . - ** Ashwoorfch, who has guided the organiyntinm in mflnAnnthip gaina in aafh nf Holland's ancestors first settled in the Southeastern Virginia county in 18...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

2 Profitability is biggest challenge, young farmers say PARK RIDGE, 111.—Overall profitability and government regulations are the biggest challenges facing America's young farmers and ranchers, and young producers want the federal government to protect property rights and cut spending, according to an American Farm Bureau Federation survey. The annual survey, targeting young farmers 18-30, tracks the attitudes and choices of young couples on issues ranging from the environment to off-farm employment. According to the survey, 30 percent of the young producers say their biggest concern is overall profitability. Government regulations was selected by 22 percent, availability of agricultural financing by 12 percent, and the availability of land and facilities by 11 percent. "In every young farmer you talk to, both national and state, that's the overall concern—profitability," agreed Craig Giese, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmer Chairman. Virginia Cooperative Extension situat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

July 1995 New commodity committees will make Farm Bureau stronger, wiser When Farm Bureau members see a need, they respond. Such was the case wi th two new commodity committees recently approved by our state board of directors. Because of the rapid growth of our poultry and equine industries, advisory committees have been formed to represent producers on both accounts. With the addition of these new committees, we now have representation on virtually every major commodity grown or raised in the Old Dominion. The organization's 15 commodity and marketing committees are grass roots advisory teams which represent farmers dealing with regulatory, legislative, marketing and production concerns. What often sets our committees apart from other groups within the agricultural industry is the fact that all our representatives are farmers. That allows Farm Bureau to develop objectives solely from a production standpoint. The 18-member poultry committee and Environmental reforms need a dose of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

4 Buyanew Dodge Thick andpekup a ton of cash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU" MEMBERS. As if our Magnum engine series, overall the most powerful line of truck engines on the planet, wasn't incentive enough for Farm Bureau members to buy a Dodge, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1995 5.9 L Magnum gas and Cummins diesel Ram regular cab pickups, plus select 1995 mid-size Dakota pickups. The offer includes all full-size 1995 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge offer.* All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover, it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. America's Truck Stop (Ijl The New Dodge A \CS A DIVISION OF THE CHRYSLER CORPORATION *This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31/95, and may not be used in combination with any other Chrysler ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

July 1995 Women play a more significant role —on and off the farm Today's farm women are no longer just growing gardens, tending chickens or milking cows as in past years, but instead are likely to be working either on the farm, off the farm, or both. In fact, farm women are 22 percent more likely to be working than other women. A recent national survey of 2 million households nationwide found that nearly 75 percent of farm women work. Three of eveiy four women were found to be either working on the farm, running a farm on their own, working with their farming husbands, or working off the farm. By contrast, only 53 percent of all women nationwide work outside the home. The survey was conducted by Janet E. Perry and Mary C. Ahearn, economists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Today farm women make a wide variety of significant contributions to the household and farm business. They Former FB president heads coast-to-coast trailride tour SYRIA —A former president of the Spotsylv...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

6 Angered landowners see hope for common sense in new regs By JOHN F.LEWIS Special to the Farm Bureau News While Congress anguishes over mayor rewrite limits in a renewal of the Clean Water Act, a number of Virginia landowners are literally praying for change. The fact that the Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) is to be the agriculture supervisor of the act for farmers may or may not help. Consider these examples. Bill Taliaferro and Sheri Sullenberger live at opposite ends ofVirginia in entirely different environs, probably don't know each other and may have only three things in common. Both are farmers. Both are sincere conservationists by virtue of upbringing and practice. And both have experienced very miserable confrontations with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Another Virginia farmer, Bruce Johnson, has complaints with other government agencies, such as the old SCS, which also has regulatory authority in wetlands matters. Creating m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

July 1995 Peanut vines already are beginning to green across the sandy fields on James Holland's farm. End of peanut quotas could be end for many growers (Continued from Page 1) manufacturers who say without the peanut quota program, the companies could provide the U.S. consumer with a cheaper product "Big business would have more control of the market," said Ashburn, a member of the Nansemond County Farm Bureau. "What difference does it make if peanuts are 30 cents a pound or 60 cents a pound, when there's only about 6 cents worth of peanuts in the product?" said Holland. "A candy bar would still be 75 cents. They are looking for a cheap product, but they still want good, quality peanuts cheap." If American formers were to no longer get peanut quotas from the government it would make no sense to grow the product, the farmers agree. Doing away with the peanut program would make way for foreign imports as well. And although the quality of peanuts grown in Argentina, China, even Afric...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1995

8 July 7: Animal Industry Day, Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Blacksburg. Contact Charlie Stott, 703-231-6676. I i July 8: Virginia Angus Field Day, Virginia Tech. Contact Dan Eversole, 703-231-6311. July 11-12: Mid-Atlantic Grazing Field Day, Augusta County. Contact Jerry Swisher, 703-245-5750. July 12: Rotational Grazing Field Day, Crimora. Contact Dr. Dan Brann, 703-231-9000. July 14-15: Angus Breeders Show, Harrisonburg. Contact Ike Eller, 703-231-5252. July 15-22: Citizenship Washington Focus, 4-H, Washington, D.C. Youngsters learn about the legislative process and visit lawmakers. Contact Rudy Powell, 804-524-5965. July 16-20: Virginia 4-H Horsemaster School, Lexington. Contact Larry Lawrence, Rabies not always rare on the farm The recent treatment of 16 people in Allegheny County who were exposed to a rabid calf is a sign that rabies are not as rare on the farm as some think. "Personally, in the last two years, Fve worked on two cattle that have had r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x