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Elephind.com contains 13,869 items from Pacific Appeal, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Sclfftious. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 29 August 1863

Sclfftious. When engineers would bridge a stream, they of ten carry over at first but a single thread. With that they next stretch wire across. Then strand is. added to strand until a foundation is laid for planks ; and now the bold engineer finds safe footway and walks from side to side. So God takes from us some golden threaded pleasure and stretches it thence to Heaven. Then he takes a child, and then friend. Then he bridges death and Reaches the thoughts of the most timid to find their way hither and thither between the two spheres. From the Independent. Visit to the Freedmen in East Virginia. BY REV. S. S. JOCEI.YN. In the recent uprising of the colored people at Norfolk, Va., for education, wjien 1,000 children and adults rushed to the schools opened in two of their churches, (by our missionary, Rev. Geo. N. Green and teachcrs,) under military authority and againsttheslavg-eode, in a district excepted in the provisions of the Prpclamation of the President, we have an earnest o...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Napoleon 111. t ) [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 29 August 1863

Napoleon III. This wondefful man, now the ruling mind of his age, was born April 24th, 1808. His father was Louis Napoleon, king of Holland, —brother of Napoleon First. His mother Queen Hortense — daughter of Josephine, the wife of Napoleon I. Napoleon I. was attached to Louis Napoleon, his nephew, from his youth, as the probable heir to the honors of his dynasty. He lived mostly with his mother in Switzerland. At the age of 20 years, he distinguished himself in a rebellion against the Pope, and cherished the presentment of his uncle Napoleon I, that he had a frand mission to fill in his relation to 'ranee. In 1836, he started a revolt against the government of Louis Phillippe, for which he was banished. A second attempt mado in 1840, which left him a life-long prisoner in the castle of Ham. But he cscapcd in disguise as a laborer, with a plank on his shoulder. The revolution of 1848 sent Louis Phillippe the king out of France, and opened the way fcr Louis Napoleon to return—to be a...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
American Affairs Abroad. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 29 August 1863

American Affairs Abroad. An English correspondent of Thurlow Weed, who has superior advantages for gaining information writes as follows, as we learn from the Albany Journal: " You have more to apprehend from the French Emperor than from England. Having failed as a mediator, he may want to recover his ground. At any rate, keep your eyes open, for I am told that rccognition, or some other move is on the tapis. I do not think he will fail in Mexico. He will not move on the Rhine, his great European object, until he has a chance, and he has none unless he sells Italy to Austria. But if he really means mischief to the United States, he has a navy that could occupy the Mississippi and smash your blockade of the Southern ports." Ex. Loss to Pennsylvania from the Invasion.—lt is estimated that the loss now sustained and that which will be necessarily sustained hereafter, even under the most favorable circumstances, by the people of Pennsylvania, in consequence of the rebel invasion, will a...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Charleston. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 29 August 1863

Charleston. THE PACIFIC APPEAL. SAN FRANCISCO : SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1863. As we write, great anxiety is manifested for the downfall of this hot-bed of treason to good government and righteous principles. South Carolina, above all the Southern States, has ever been defiant to the National Government. She had, for years before the rebellion broke out, set herself in hostile attitude against an important provision of the Constitution, Art. IV. sec. 2. " The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States." If a colored seaman entered that port he was seized and imprisoned without crime. If the colored men whom New York, or Massachusetts, or any of the New England States recognized as citizens, went to Charleston, or any part of South Carolina, notwithstanding the above plain and vital principle of the American Constitution, they could not collect a debt or exercise any of their civil rights, in consequence of barbarous, o...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Order for Enrollment. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 29 August 1863

Order for Enrollment. Provost Marshal General's Office, j Washington, August 21st 1863. } Circular No. 75.—8y direction of the President of the United States, the State of California is divided into three Enrollment Districts, as follows : The Counties of Butte, Colusa, Del Nortre, Humboldt, Klamath, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Yolo and Yuba, to constitute and be known as the Northern District, headquarters at Marysville. The counties of Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tuolumne, to constitute and be known as the Middle District, with headquarters at Sacramento. The Counties of Alameda, Buena Vista, Contra Costa, Fresno, Los Angeles, Mariposa, Merced, Monterey, Santa *Barbara, Santa Clara, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Tulare, and San Francisco, to constitute and be known as the Southern District, with headquarters at San Francisco. Ja...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
€somiMmiation;o. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 29 August 1863

Communications. For the Pacific Appeal. COLORED MEN OF CALIFORNIA. NO. VII. William Henry Hall. It is seldom we can select one who commenced a career of usefulness at as early an age, and has continued it as uninterruptedly as the subject of the present notice. Win. H. Hall was born in Washington City, D. C., and is now about forty years of age. He was born of free parents ; his ancestors, the Halls and Dunlaps, having enjoyed a state of freedom for three generations. Mr. Hall's advantages of education in his early life were few. Two causes tended to produce a result so much regretted by himself and so deplored by his friends. The stringent laws of the South prevented his parents from giving him an education at home, and although they were abundantly able to send him elsewhere to school, the idea prevailed with them, as with many others in former days, that " book larning was useless for colored folks," and that they had got along well enough without " edycation," and their children...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

THE PACIFIC APPEAL. JL JpaufirLctl, denoted, ta the Jfntei L e&t& of the of /paint. -No. 23.) VOL. II — SAN FKANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, SEPTEMIIEH 5, 1863. [WHOLE NO. 75.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Contributors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

Our Contributors. Dr. EZRA It. JOHNSON, REV. J. J. MOORE, Rev. T. M. D. WARD, J. B. SANDERSON, J. M. BELL, WM. H. YATES, E. F. DUPLEX, WM. 11. FOOTE, WM. 11. HALL, WM. A. SMITH, J. M. WHITFIELD, JACOB FRANCIS, S. B. SE Rill NOT ON, DR. WM. H C. STEPHENSON, CHARLES M. WILSON, A. FERGUSON. And others that will bo announced from t ime to time, with a number of lady contributors.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A U E NTS. | [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

A U E NTS. | The Rev. T. M. D. Ward, Traveling Agent. , Isaac Morton, General Agent for Nevada Terri tory. Martin Carson,.Stockton, Cal. Win. Mills, ' - " James Nichols, Sacramento City. Albert I), Berjfiart " Isaac Sanks, Grass Valley. J. E. Smith, Yreka. E l. Duplex, Maryaville. Robert Banks, Big Oak Flat. Wm. Smith, San Jose. George Miller, Peteluma. Wm. VV. Rich, Oakland. Denis Carter, Nevada. Elijah Booth, '* S. P. Clanton, Benicia. . Jo3oph S. Hatton.'Napa. Peter Johnson, Placerville. Slephen Ball, Coloma. William H )lmes, Oroville. Jamjs 11. Hulson, Suisun City. Lewis G. Green, Los Angeles. Isaac Flood, San Antonio. Robert H. Small, Coalterville. James Moody, Jackson, Amador Co. Chas. G. Hawkins, Sutter Creek, " W. Mdvu j 11, Michigan Bar. R. S. Miner, Llancha Plana. L. A. Monroe, Mariposa. John C. Mortimore, Aurora, Mono co. Wm. 11. Foot.:, Weaverville, Trinity county. Dvvid Mclt synolds, Shasta. \V.n. Prescott, Portland, Oregon. Richard W. Freeman, Dalles, Oregon. Wm. Payne...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
f [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

Selections. FOUND TO BE A LIAR.. —A speaker in a meeting, enlarging upon the rascality of the devil, got off the following pithy words: When I was about getting religion, the devil tr'ed to dissuade me from it, and told me if I did not get religion I could not go into gay company, and lie and steal, and do such and such things ; but I have found him out to be a great liar. The poor man's purse may be emty but he has as much gold in the sunset and si.ver in the moon as anybody. The 54th Mass. Regiment at the Siege of Charleston, July 23d. Beaufort, S. C., July 23, 1863. To the editor of the Boston Journal: —In the storming of Fort Wagner on the night of Saturday, July 18, 1863, the 54tih Massachusetts led the assault. The fight was of a " hand to hand" encounter at the same time that the guns from Fort Sumter and Cummings Point were pouring shot and shell at "crossfire" at a terrible rate upon brave troops. Acoording to all accounts, it was one of the most destructive close encounter...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Fortitude ot the Negroes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

Fortitude ot the Negroes. Policemen, soldiers and citizens who came into direct communication with the negroes during the recent disturbances in the city, speak in the highest terms of the remarkable fortitude which they exhibited during the period of peril and alarm, and the still more extraordinary magnanimity which has characterized their conduct since. Driven utterly destitute from their homes, hounded about the streets like wild beasts, threatened with a cruel death at every turn, and cursed as the vilest of created things, they have returned neither curses nor revilings, but have preserved throughout a calm front and au attitude of demeanor which, in the whites, we designate as a mark of nobility. lie who reflects upon the situation of the negroes during the week ot riot, cannot fail to see something of sublimity in their carriage, something of grandeur in their undaunted tranquillity. The soldier who with troops of comrades marching shoulder to shoulder, faces the enemy in th...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Pagan Legend of Jesus- [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

A Pagan Legend of Jesus- Pubulus Lentulus, assumed by some to have been proconsul of Judea, prior to Herod, is reported to have seen tlio Saviour, and to have written the following letter to the Roman Senate: "At this tim 6 there appeared.a man who is still living and endowed with mighty power ; hia name is Jesus Christ. His disciples call him the Son of God ; others regard him as a powerful prophet. He raises the dead to life, heals the sick of every description of infirmity as well as disease. This man is of lofty stature and well proportioned; his countenance serene and virtuous, so that he inspires beholders with feelings both of fear and love. The hair of his head is the color of wine, and from the top of the head-to the ears, straight and without radiance, but it descends from the oars to the shoulders in shining curls. From the shoulders the hairs flows down the back, divided into portions, after the manner of the Nazarenea; his torehead clear and without wrinkle ; his face f...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Election. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

The Election. TIIE PACIFIC APPEAL. SAN FRANCISCO: SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1863. California has been weighed in the-bal-ance and not found wanting. There never has been a more desperate contest for the reins of State Government than that made by the party which was defeated on Wednesday last. The question which was decided by that contest was, whether we should endorse and sustain the National Administration and all its measures in the prosecution of the war for the suppression of the rebellion, or put a party in power who would thwart the efforts of the Nation, al Government. The issue was plain and open between the friends and enemies of the Administration—Union or Disunion. The result places California high among the loyal States of the Union. She now shines as the true " Gem of the West," and unites her splendors with Massachusetts, the " Athens of America," standing unmistakable in her attitude of devotion and patriotism to the Federal Government. The voice of the people from the...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Rev. T. Stai'r King's Lecture. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

Rev. T. Stai'r King's Lecture. On Thursday (.'veiling, the Kov. T. Starr King lectured in the A. M. E. Church, Powell street, on " The Genius and Poetry of John G. YVhittier." The audience was large and refined, intermixed with a quite a number of white persons. Mr. King, before proceeding with the lecture, prefatorily remarked that the result of the election of the preceding day was an endorsement, by the people of this State, of two of the most important measures that ever concerned the friends of humanity, freedom and progress, viz : the Emancipation Proclamation Mid the repeal of the statutes preventing colored persons from testifying in the courts of justice in this State. (Applause.) MiKing then commenced his lecture by saying : When our national army marched into the Manasses fortifications, after the rebels evacuted them, they found there some maple logs couch ant, carved into the likeness of cannon. These were called L>y our soldiers "Quaker guns." Put the Quaker...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
List of Letters Received since Our Last. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

List of Letters Received since Our Last. Martin Carson, Stockton ; E. P. Duplex, Murysville; Isaac Morton, Genoa, N. T , 2 ; J. H. Dickson, jr., Camp Babbit; T. H. McCullough, City; leter Johnson, Placerville; , Sacramento ; Stephen Ball, Coloma. Ihere was a son of Fred. Douglass, the negro orator, among the stormers of Fort Wagner. A correspondent says of him : Sergeant-Major Lewis H. Douglass, a sou of Fred. Douglass, by both white and negro troops is said to have displayed great courage and calmness, was one of the first to mount the parapet, and with his powerful voice shouted : "Come on, boys, and fight for God and Governor Andrew," and with this battle cry led them into the fort. The Times' special dispatch says the enlistment of colored troops in the lower counties of Maryland is progressing favorably. Ihe negroes are glad to enlist, in order to escape severities, their owners being generally rebels or secession sympathizers. Philapelpam, August 31.—Richmond papers of the 29t...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Communications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

Communications. For the Pacific Appeal. A Voice in the City.—On Our Duty to Our Kindred. As I pursue my daily avocation, humble and prescribed as it is, in consequence of the atmosphere of the " white-winged angels," by which I and my people are surrounded, I take consolation in the conscientious persuasion that, erelong, this people—the poor, rejected, and seemingly universally forsaken race—shall move out of this circumscribed sphere, and soar, high up, to the summit of an honorable reputa tion. earned by their loyalty, their undoubted energy and perseverance, and by their brethren's blood spilled at treason's door, as an auxiliary in cleansing the earth of polluted demagogues, whose existence rendered civilization almost intolerable to my kindred and people. » The mere persuading of them as to their future prosperity is not sufficient to elevate them to the standard of modern civilization and '• human equality." What they want is moral, intellectual, and particularly physical aid...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
§r OtttJJ. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

§r OtttJJ. For the Pacific Appeal. Tell Me That She is Not Dead 1 ■fell me that she is not dead ! It ia too soon ; As well the sun might get before his noon. Tell me that she is not dead. Her face is cold and pale ; her eyelids closed ; On pallid lips a shadowy mystery lies : Tell me that she is not dead. Should I be thus, and could my heart beat on, If she who is its hope, its life were gone? Soul of my soul reply. Dead in strength and blosscm of her prime! No, no 1 0, Heaven I O God ! It was not time— No, no I not time foryhnr to die! Spsak to her, friend ! She may awake, llut do not, I entreat, for Christ's dear sake, Tell me that she is dead. Her lips move not! No, no, she cannot speak ; And yet the shadow lies on brow and cheek. Tell me that she is not dead. Dead, dead ! And the sun shines and the stars glisten, And men speak calmly ; surely I but fancy ; lfcsten Alas ! I do not dream or sleep. The world moves on! I hear its even tread ; It thinks, cares, toils and hopes, thoug...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
g.'atcsit Sckgrajihic Qtw. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

g.'atcsit Sckgrajihic Qtw. The Savannah Neiox of the 18th says : It is estimated that the number of soldiers now in the Confederate army, and preparing for the field, is 575,000 and adds, this hardly reaches half our lighting population. Headquarters, Morris Island, August 24, 13GS5—General Halleck :—1 have the honor to report the practical domolition of Fort Sumter, as the result of our seven days bombardment of that work, during two days of which a powerful northeast storm, most seriously diminished the accuracy and effect of our lire. Fort Sumter is to-day a sharpeless fCnd harmless mass of ruins. My Chief of Artillery, Colonel Turner, reports the destruction so complete, that it is no longer of any avail, for the defence of Charleston. He also states by a longer lire, it could be more completely a ruin, but it coulcKbe scarcely more powerless for the defence of the harbor. Breaching batteries are located at distances varying from thirty-three hundred to forty-two hundred and for...

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MARRIED. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

MARRIED. In Brooklyn, on Sunday evening, July 25, by Rev. J. Morris William?, Henry Browx to Mrs. Emily Bailey, all of Brooklyn.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DIED. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Appeal — 5 September 1863

DIED. At New Haven, July 14, John H. Brooks, Jr. "the beloved son of J. 11. and Fanny Brooks, aged 1 year 2 months and 18 days. ' In this city, Sept. Ist, John P. Hufk, a native ol Columbus, Georgia, aged forty-two years, ty Victoria. V. 1., papers please oonv.

Publication Title: Pacific Appeal
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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