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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WIRE ROPES FOR THE PANAMA CANAL. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

WIRE ROPES FOR THE PANAMA CANAL. •: Tests have recently been carried out in the United States of wire ropes to be used as towing lines at the great locks on the Panama Canal. For this purpose forty ropes have been already made, each having six strands with thirty-seven wire* in each strand, the latter being twisted round a centre of hemp. The diameter of the rope is one inch. A- tensile strength of 37 tons in each rope was specified, and this re quires a tensile strength in tlie wire of 160,0001b. per square inch. All the ropes passed the test, and showed that they possessed strengths ranging from 12 to 15 per cent, in ex cess of that specified. In towing boats through the locks, four electric locomotives will be used for each vessel, two connectod by wire ropes to the bows, and two to the stern.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A CELLULOID SUBSTITUTE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

A CKl.I.ULOin SUBSTITUTE. German leather workers have re cently been experimenting with n nsw process of preparing leather by means of which it becomes almost transparent, firm, elastic, and water proof. Tt is claimed also that it is almost incombustible, a very pront improvement. The process, which is •'> trade secret, consists to nome extent: in saturating the leather with hot oil, then kneading: and rolling it, It absorbs a large amount of oil, becomes tenacious and of tho consis tency of tortoiseshell. Its value in the arts is likely to bo very prcat, and especially in electrical work it is supposed that it will be more effec tive for certain purposes than rub ber. It may be made thicker thai) tho natural hide.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A PECULIAR PUNISHMENT [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

A I'KCrUAl! I'I'MSI l.M K\T A convicted, former has been Hen- ! tcneed by ,1 California!! Jud^e to serve two years as a hermit in the mountains. Derails? i he prisoner is Mty-ciKht years old th- .Inil-e was not inclined to ^ive him a iail sen tence.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHERE IGNORANCE IS BLISS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

WHERE IGNORANCE IS BLISS. As nn example of pathetic ignor ance and misplaced—though nodoubt conscientious—zeal, \vc can have no more striking instance than those* members of the Society of Friends, who, before the Governor-General designate of Australia left England, waited upon him and implored»him to exert his influence towards a return to voluntary military ^training in Australia. The question of the merits or de-: merit6 of compulsory training ia he Bide the mark. The point is that a certain policy has been formed, ap proved and introduced - by a law which has been passed by the people's representatives in the Commonwealth Parliament ; and on the advice of his Ministers the Govet nor-General of Australia has accorded it his assent. 13y what authority then does a body of Friends—or indeed any other Jlritish institution — approach His I Majesty's representative in Australia and tender a perfectly unjustifiable request that he should "support" the overthrow* of the expressed wishes...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"SAVING THE EMPIRE." [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

" SAVING THE EMPIRE." I Almost immediately it is probablo • that a navnl conference will meet in London to discuss the insistent pro blems of naval defence ; and an Im perial Conference will be held next year, when the question of the main tenance of the general nnvnl supre macy, of the whole Kinptrc will he ex pertly dealt with. Tho great crux of the future un doubtedly will be the maintenance of white supremacy in the Pacific Ocean". The Premier of New Zealand recent ly foretold that the Pacific would he "the storm centre of the future." That went. American naval his torian, Admiral Mahan, has declared that "the question of the Pacific is j probably the greatest worlil-pro!>lom of tho twentieth century and curi : ously enough, some years back an Oxford professor expressed the opi nion that the cutting of the Panama Canal, allied to the awakening of the East, with its teeming population, would exert "a profounder inthirnce upon the destinies of mankind, than the discovery of Ame...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Freak of Nature. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

A Freak of Nature. While cutting 111» an ash-tive, sn, in circmnf'-rcnce. at Knibleinn Saw n.il), Cumberland. i)u sji-avits un served a Hark c>1 in the c-miIiv 01 the trunk. It was fount! to |>e u Kparro'-V* nest cent aimm; i h«» f.M thers an'l skeleion nf a dead bird and /our ••erj.'.s. Tin- «>p^-sh.>l!s were cxcocliii^lv well presided. ].<m "in the atton»;»t to ex* nr;» 1e i lnm sunt" : wero broken. ;mri it was found that 'their contents had been ••ntiivlx ab sorbed. It «s assumed thai t h*j j bird built its nest ;-i the h"ll"v. , i' jthe tree and diet! while siniiiLr nn the ogirs. the hoi" b.'rn.nii Lr scah-l n|> as the tree «ruw. The n«->t ha 1 |»robnbly been built a eenturv a^n, the tret1 being u*. ««r a hundred years old, • " You're terribly sown* in your religion, Donald. I suppose vou think we're all going to perdition, and nobody will In.* saved buj you and your minister !" "I'm not so sure o' thai," said Donald, thoughtfully. "Ye Ken, f whiles ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Indian Border Raids. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Indian Border Raids. From tlino to time a short para graph in the English papers, moro especially during the winter months, draws the nttcntion of the public to the fnct that raids, such as for merly took place on the borderlnnd [ of England and Scotland, are still almost o cowmonplaca ovent in t\u>! vast tracts of country * agilely ro frrivd to os the N'orth-Wc.st Fron- ; tier of India. Those of us who haw been privileged to* visit, that very, j interesting region enn readily .un derstand how it is that, in spite <>i the splendid troops concentrated there, and the largo Min.s annually expended on their upkeep, and dis bursed in other ways to secure thn safety of life and property near iho frontier, ever.*' winter soon a »v- . currence of those raids. I Th^ country itself is extremely | wild and mountainous, and its in- ! habitants, physically a splendid t \ po | of the human race, arc equally wild | and undisciplined. Urought up f'mm ' boyhood to the use of arms, t...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Speech by Telephone. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Speech by Telephone. i_ . President Wilson has created a i precedent in speech-making which ! will probably be imitated by future I Presidents and prominent politicians | who, through lack n' time for tra : veiling, arc unable to fulfil many engagements. The President had promised to ad dress the Rochester Chamber of Commerce at the members' annual banquet'which was livid recently. but being unable to leave Washington he arranged to deliver his address by telephone. Accordingly .special ar rangements were made by the trie phone companies at, Washington and Rochester, Now York, and each of the three hundred diners at the banquet was provided with a head piece receiver. About 800 miles auny in the White House the President stepped to a specially fltted-up telephone in his private office and delivered his address, which was clearly beard bv nil present. The President himself hnd a headpiece receiver, and was able to listen to the cheers which greeted his address, and to the vote of tha...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIAN COMPOSER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

AUSTRALIAN COMI'OSIUl. I .Mr. (.}. \V. Marshall-Halt's opera "Romeo and Juliet," has been pub ishod ia London. Jlis composition ".Stella," tlx- first AtiHtralian grand opera staged in the Common wealth, will he produced in the Alwych The utre, probably uext month.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BENEFICENT FORESTS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

BENEFICENT FORESTS. The important cflect upon climate »>hich the presence or lack of forests wakes, is a subject which cannot he often enough repeated until all farm ers have thoroughly learned the les son and set about benefiting by it in a practical manner. Although much discussion has al ready ranged round the point as to whether forests directly influence tho rainfall of a country, it is still a de batable question ; but that climate is affected by the presence of trees, and totally changed by their wholesale destruction, there can be no doubt. To prove this point we have only to turn to America's experience. In Manitoba, U.S.A., fifty years ago, peaches grew abundantly, quite un affected ,by the climate ; since then the forests have been destroyed, and the cultivation of the fruit has been abandoned in consequence. Northern Kansas, too, has found the same re sult follow excessive deforestation. The large orchardistn in California have lone recognised the invaluable service w...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEW ZEALAND HAS SURPLUS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

NEW ZEALAND HAH SURl'LUS. j . A surplus of .CJOO.OOO is announcod j by tbc New Zealand Oovcrnmont for I the financial year ending March 31, 11914. i —

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KING OF THE CEREALS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

KINO OF THE CEREALS. I t ! Of nil the cereals that grotr, nourish, find onrich the Agriculturist, none is more beautiful — both from an aesthetic and commercial stand point—than maizo. Here, in Austra lia* we have set up, and worship, an 1 august and boautiful—but novcrthe •ess, false—god. Wheat bus returned n thousandfold j to us, in hard cash, the time, toil, , and hopes that hardy pioneers and I lion-hearted' farmers have ungrudg ingly expended for its successful cul tivation ; and yet, taken all round, n tield of maize with it* grace and Ht.itclines8, and its utility both for mnn and beast, is cosily Kins of the Cereals. The United States has long recog nised the regnl qualities of this grain. as figures will show. Over 3,000/'"0 bushels more than oats and •l,uo0,0ii0 bushels more than wheat is produced there annually ; and we find that country heading the cereal out puts of the world by a maize crop which yields 3.S75,927,0'm.» bushels, or %,4 IS.U00 tons. I Maize waves over 10...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ON AN UNLAID LINE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

ON' AN I \LAIL» LINK. •: A nii Iwuv si^nnlimui .got leave | to / get mnrnod. ami wus given a' juisjt over tin- I.!)«'. On his u'ayj baek-r he showed tlie tic'col eoiiec-' tor his marriage certificate by mis-j lake, for .hi:? pass. The tic*oi col-j lector }jtiidiocl it rnrefullyT ntul then Miiri, "Eh, inon, yon've got a tic ket for a lung, wenrisonui journey, hut no' on the Ciilcfloniun." ; lleforc blanching: almonds sonU them for two or three minutes in boiling water ; the sUiii will then slip oft' quite easily- [

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Weakest of all Animals. HOW MONKEYS CAN TEACH US TO MAKE OUR OWN BABIES STRONGER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Weakest of all Animals. HOW MONKEYS CAN' TEACH US TO MAKE OUR OWN BABIES STRONGER. (By Wm. LEE HOWARD, M.D-) We do not find curvature of the spine, hernia, displacement of in ternal organs, and many other ana tomical distortions in the upright animals such as the gibbon, chim panzee, and gorilla. These dis tressing deformities are common oc currences in man, and have been the surgeon's mosUdespairing conditions for correction. Why should man alone bo so advantageously placed for his daily labours ? It is because these displacements and distortions are duo to some thing more than anatomical trou bles. They are a part*oi the pen alty man pays for evolutionary de velopment—as our brain strengthens our body weakens. • Almost every four-footed animal starts to walk a few hours after birth. Those that do not, crawl. Their internal organs lie horizon- j tally along tho belly supported by strong muscles. If you take a puppy and force it to walk on its htnd legs ©very day, soon the internal ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AGONY IN ATHLETICS. WHAT HAPPENS IN TWELVE SECONDS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

AGONY IN ATHLETICS. WHAT HAPPENS IN TWELVE SECONDS. *»•*?. n.v»« —< It Will bo seen that nt first (lie expression is one of concentration, but. midway the demand for oxygen lends the nthleto to open tho mouth to tho fullest rapacity, while at tho finish lie is practically in a state of asphyxiation, owing to the amount of carbonic acid gas h») is producing.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fleas and Flies Have their Parasites. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Fleas and Flies Have their Parasites. The latest discovery announced in the Paris Academy of Sciences is that of tho parasite of the flea, which, it is claimed, is tho chief agent in tho spread of the plague and other diseases transmitted by this insect. Pulex irritans, as tho flea is called in scientific writing. Is tho victim of tho leishmanioses, which live in the flea's digest ivo tubing, and it is this parasite which really transmits the plague and other in fectious, and not the much-abused flea himself, who is only indirectly responsible, being compelled to carry this parasite onco it finds lodgment in his anatomy. The flea looks small enough to our eye, and he is so lively that no one ever thought that any other parasite could catch him, but it seems that not only do the leish maniases catch him, but they also catch the plague,' or yellow [over, and are the most important car riers of the genus. This discovery has much to sug gest to our iuvestigators, for they have blameci f...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FLOATING LADY. AN INTERESTING PROBLEM. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

THE FLOATING LADY. 1 AN* INTERESTING PROBLEM. * A show man brought on the stage a young woman, who, after being hypnotised, was placed in a wooden casket, tho front of which was thou lot down. From tho depths of tho casket tho womnn rose horizontally into the air, apparently unaided, und remained floating at a height of three or four feet above the cas ket. There Were no wires in sight ; there was no black drop-cloth at the back of the stage ; the foot lights nnd the border lights of the How did the shuwjiian.onu.su the lady to float in the air V stage wore nil .turned on; thorn wcrie no mirrors; it seemed to he apparent that there wax no machi nery. - - How, then, .-did the showman make the girl recline in the air ? ■THE' 'PROBLEM' SOLVED. What happens.is this.- The casket into which the woman is lowered has a -hinged false hack and false bottom. In tins false bottom an inflatable balloon doll, the double of the woniHii,-.is. stored. When the woman is put in the casket she is. : Tw...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Salt Marvels. NEW METHODS AND DISCOVERIES. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Salt Marvels. ? NEW METHODS AND DIS COVERIES. That the ssnlt industry In Great Britain is one of considerable mag nitude is ovident from the /act that the United Kingdom produces nearly one-eighth of the world's supply. According to the latest available figures, the world's output for twelve months is HV»5S,07tl tons. The British Kmpire supplied • 3,5-J5,150 tuns, of which J,870,">.50 enme from the Tinted Kingdom and 1,MOO,-177 from India. Suit, by the way, is stiil taxed in British India. Indeed, the revenue from the salt duty cmues next in value to that from land and opium. In modern Italy sail, as well as tobacco, is a Government mono poly. There are three principal sources from which salt is obtained, i salt lakes, the sea. and salt-mines. The great Salt Lak-« in I'tah, America, provides a very pood qual ity of halt, but it has to be puri fied before it is suitable for the table. The world depends for its chief supply on "the beds of salt rock underground. The biggest salt* \...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Milk For Human Food. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Milk For Human Food. Whnt is tho most desirable milk for human /ood ? Is it tho mo* dium-fat milk ? Is it tho low fat milk ? Is it skhnmilk ? One thing appears to he accepted nnd taught by nil competent .scientific hygienists, dietitians, speeinlifcts and physicians, both in Europo and tho United States, namely, that it is not the so-called "rich" milk, that is, the merely high-fat milkr that best answers the food needs of hu man beings. European milk in general is medium-fat or low-fat milk, and the European experts in variably recommend the ii.se of the milk that contains the lowest fat percentage when drawn from the cow. The milk of the Holland l'.Inck-and Wbites, our so-called i;nd mis-called tlolstein-Friesians, which ranges in fat content from slightly over 4 per cent, down to h1 i/j!i11\' under H per cent., is the most highly and most widely recommended food nnlk in Europe. The high-fat milks are condemned as constipating, over heating and unbalanced foods. The European idea ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSE DENTISTS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

HOUSE DENTISTS. A lucrative business is doue in New Zealand Ijy horse dentists, who travel throughout the country districts and examine teams"oT"horses and trent them if necessary.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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