ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 46,739 items from Carcoar Chronicle, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
46,739 results
MOUNT McDONALD. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 27 February 1892

Mount McDonald. (from our correspondent) At the Police Court to-day, before Mr. T. A. Smith, P.M , and E. J.-Fox, -J.P., James Bourke pleaded guilty to stealing a quartz   specimen from ''Butcher's Mine" and was   sentenced to 15 days; James Thompson and     John Sullivan were fined 5s. and costs each for drunkenness; S. S. B. Ray pleaded guilty   to riotous behaviour and obscene language and was fined 10s.  

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
" CHRISTMAS HISTORY." [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

'CHRISTMAS HISTORY.' ^ ? WHILE we are enjoying the 'merrie Christmas-tide it ia interesting to gather and examine a few out of the many historical 'threads and thrums' which are so largely woven into the elements of the season. Ever new as it seems, alwavs associated with the evergreens twining about its brow, Christmas is old, old, and the locks beneath the ivy and holly are hoary. We have no certain traces of the cele bration of the Nativity, or birth of Christ, until nearly two hundred years after His death ; but we find with that celebration the singing of carols or sacred music began. These were also sometimes called 'mauger songs,' particularly in Germany, where also first appeared the 'Christ tree,' adorned with nif e for the household and friends. Iu England 'merriment and piety were pleasantly combined' in these songs, but in Franoe the carols were far more guy than sacred. In the year 1525 tlie holiday lime in England was known as the 'still Christmas.' for owing to the il...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

HOME, SWEET HOME. — »»♦ The story of the circumstances of its' composition, with the verses as ori ginally written and as presented to the public, also verses added to the sheet miiBic by Mr. Payne for his relative, Mrs. Bates. John Howard Payne, the author of ' Home, Sweet Home,' was born in the city of New York, June 9th, 1791, and died at Tunis, April 9th, 1852. Among the many compositions of which he was the author, was an opera entitled ' Clari, the Maid of Milan.' The music was composed by Sir Henry Bishop, and includes many beautiful melodies. The heroine's principal song 'homb, sweet home,' «b the subject of thia ballad. Mr. Payne relates that when he was travelling in Italy he heard a peasant woman singing a sweet and tender air, which made an instant impression on his mind. He induced the woman to repeat it until he could write down the' notes. With the melody and the measure in mind he wrote the song, and then gave it to the composer, who re-touched the notation and furni...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

THERE lived in this good city onoe a man of eighty-seven, Brimful of gouty aches and painB, just ripe for death and heaven ; And as it was good Christinas Eve he thought he'd try his luck By hanging up bis stocking, for he still loved fun and pluck. Next door to him a maiden lived, a lovely, charming miss ; She had but sixteen Bummers seen, was full of life and bliss, Her eyes, her cheeks, her hands, her face — well, they were just perfection! And she hung up her stocking too, with bright and gay reflection. On ChriBtmas morn that aged man his stocking full he found, With plenty more' of other things pinned up and nailed around. r r He wiped his specs five hundred timrs, his laughter turned to screaming, On opening such queer packages ; he thought he mimt be dreaming. A. bustle, hair-pins, bracelets four, gold garters, eighteen veils, A gross of gloves, nine bonnets gay, a caBe to shine the nails, Bix dresses, stylish, flowing trains, two muffs, and seal-skin sack, Two parasols, a d...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Home, Sweet Home, as originally written by Mr Payne. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

Home, Sweet Home, as originally written by Mr Payne* 'Mid pleasures and palaces tho' wo may roam, Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home. A charm from the sky seems to hallow ub there, Like the love of a mother surpassing all other, Which, seek thro' the world, is ne'er met with elsewhere. There's a spell iu the shade where our infancy played, Even stronger than time, more deep than despair. Chorus. — An exile from home, splendor dazzles in vain, Oh I give me my lovely thatched cot tag.: again. Ihe birds and the lambkins that came at my cull, Those who named me with pride, those who played by my side. Give me them, with their innooonce, dearer than all. The joys of the palaces through which 1 roam, Only swell ray heart's anguish, there's no place like home. John Howard Payne, the author of ' Home, Sweet Home,' was for years without a homa/'and used to hear his own song sung in oitiea when he had not a shilling to buy his next meal or a place to lay Iiib head. Mark Twain on...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN UNCLE'S REVENGE. OR HOW BANDY WON HIS BRIDE. [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] CHAPTER I. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

AN UNCLE'S REVENGE. (All Rights Rbsesvedi] OR HOW BANDY WON HIS BRIDE By (lie Author of 'Morals Without Fables'; 'Deacon Steel' t ' Hullabaloo,' etc., etc. CHAPTER I. The brief twilight which closes the autumn day of Sunny New South Wales was fast taking possession of the surroundings of Wattlebloom Station, in the Riverina, as Jim Smart, the stock-rider and sheep manager enjoying his last smoke-oh for the day — was exchanging a tew common place remarks with his mate Bandy (surname unknown). While Jim's missus— hailing origi nally from the Old Kent Road, London — was preparing the bunk for the sleeping accommodation of their three olive-branches— boys, ranging in age from six to two— the slid youngsters were disporting themselves in the sand before the hut. The eldest of the trio, denominated by his father, Jimmy the Second, the chief end of whose existence was to watch over by day and cuddle to sleep at night his youngest brother, Tommy, had for' once been false to his trust, leavi...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCARFPINS FOR THREE. A CHRISTMAS STORY PART I. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

SCARFPINS FOR THREE. A CHRISTMAS STORY Part l r was Christmas Eve in name only. By nature it was far from being so. The howling of the winds, the drenching rain, alter nating with cutting flurries of sieet, suggested anything but theseason of peace on earth and goodwill to men. These found me silting, a prey to gloomy reflections, in my lodgings, smoking, and raging at the hard fate which had kept me in town over the Christmasholidays, while all myfriends were off in the country enjoying the hospitality of that prince of enter tainers, Dawson. I was particularly unhappy over my enforced absence from the gaieties of the Dawson house party at Belmore, for the very good reason that I had laid my plans to put a long-deferred and exceedingly im portant question to Dawson's sister Helen during my contemplated stay there ; and ray unhappiness was further aggravated by the fact that I had reason to believe that my friend and rival, Gerald Parsons, who, more fortunate than I in having no bus...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Farmer's Last Penny [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

The Farmers Last Penny The farmer went out of doors in the warm spring morning and looked around, A pleasant breeze blew across the fields, bringing, a soent of fresh green grass and of first cuds swelling on the thorn and briar. The spring oorn was -all sown ; harrows with sharp teeth had mixed earth and seed ; and the big smoothing roller had done its final work. The farmer's thoughts went on to a time when hotter, sunnier skies would ' stretch above the cornlandB, and lighten up. , the toll-ioad whioh ran like a white line through the little highland strath. He pictured the fields covered with yellow grain; the reapers thrusting in their soythes ; the great waggons bearing home thoir precious loads ; he heard the shouts as the hut sheaf was gathered in— and then the old man sighed, tears wetted Mb cheeks, long unused to tears, and at length he sobbed aloud, ' Ay,' he sadly said, ' 'twill a' be there, the bonnie hairst wark, bit I'm fearing' no for me.' ' He turned and went inside...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PART II. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

Part ii. I gazed in astonishment at my visitor for a moment, and then rose to welcome him. ' Why, Gerald,1 I said, ' what does this mean ? I thought you had gone to Belmore.' ' I'm on my way there now,' he re plied, gaily. ? I have a cab at the door. It is too wet to bring it up with me, so I told the Jehu te wail outside I've stepped in here to get you and insist upon your coming with me. Dawson told me some cockand bull story about your being too busy to get off. He doesn't know as well as I do- The idea of a writer ever being too busy. Why, it's almost funny, Jack, really.' ' It is strange,' I replied. ? Writing is such easy work. Nothing but dipping a pen in ink and then wiggling it over a sheet of paper— but tell me, how is it that you are not already at UCIIII'JIC T ' That's simple enough,' said Gerald. ' A man can't be at two places at once. I am here, therefore I cannot be at Belmore.' 'Nonsense!' said I 'I thought you were going up with the others at three o'clock.' ' So I ...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO ANIMAL FOOD FOR HIM. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

NO ANIMAL FOOD FOR HIM. Doptor (cheerily) : ' Yon have got along well enough now to indulge in a little animal food and ? ' . Patibkt (angrily) : V No yon don't 1 I've suffered enough on your old gruel and slops, LBBBBBBkftnMUl be hanmd HI don't sooner ^^^^^?^???anjMij^^jati I ' ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ase H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Bo has ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B) and V^l|^^^^^^^Vwhy ?bmply OVa^^^^^^V-have, jyCTPtra veiling, i^^^^^HKumnier Binding over me (^????n window B me?! : ! . i^^^^^ PHlbti : ' M&in sohri vaa tet, How mooch HJK seharge for emparming de pody ? ' UndShtakkr : ' We will do a very satis factory job for ten pounds.' Lbvi : ' Und how moooh you diioount for He-*-' Had I known lhat the luntu I wns so long, 1 vnuld hftWltiised you?' Mabel — 'jDidn't you?' He— 'Of course not.' Mnbel— ' Well, Homebody else did V Mrs. Emanuel's artistic double drawing room was almost full of ladies one winter afternoon. It was a Monday, and her day ' 4t Home.' The season was in full swing at...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Amusing Parlour Pastimes. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

Amusing Parlour Pastimes. Here are two experiments which will be fount) useful in entertaining an even ing party : If a bar of iron or steel Bvoh as a poker taken into a darkened room the bar will ' gradually cool and become duller and duller, till eventually it oeaseB to glow. In a few seoonds, however, it will onoe more beoome net, and assume again the red.hot stage. After this the bar will cool down in. the ordinary way, no further reoalescence being visible. The seoond experiment is to make a piano sound like a banjo ; Take one-half of a newspaper or a sheet of tissue paper and plaoo it behind the hammers of a piano (between them and the wires), and then play a tune. Tou will find the sound of the piano exaotly resemble* that of a bavjo.

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Ringing the Changes. AN AUSTRALIAN HORSE PASTORAL. BY C. H. S. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

Ringing the Changes, AN AUSTRALIAN HORSE PASTORAL. Br C. H. S. One steaming Sunday morning, we was riding slowly down— TLat's me and Joe from Walwa— to Tarioola town, Ani the chapel bell was ringing, as we cleared the bit of scrub Thai bounds the parson's paddock, at the hack of Riley's pub. We hadn't got a dcenar*, and we're anxious here to state We'd break no Sunday liquor laws— whilst Kiley kept a slate. This Bilcy seemed obliging, till he mentioned ?Toe'd a bill That stretched instead of shrinking up and settling in his till. So Joe to head him off talks horse, and, giving me a wink, Says, 'Kiley, what was you before you took to selling drink 1 I've heard as how you used to own a ringing good old gray: The Badger, quite a champion in the steeple chasing way.' First Riley wrinkles up his lips, half whistles, then hetpoke: ''Tis a very tinder topic, bhoys; that gray horse Bint me broke. But take a nobbier to his name, and while I tell ine tale, Just wish with me them Ooulia coves ...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Merry Christmas." [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

'Mmy Christmas.' ' AIerrie Christmas,' with all Its tradi tional associations and rich remembrances is once more at oar doors. Not, as in England, do we, who are Australians by birth and adoption, celebrate this time honoured Season. Instead of the ice and snow of the dear old land, we ure surrounded by all the physical peculiarities of a torrid clime ; but, accompanied by many blessings which our grand old parent-land lacks, we have just as much reason to hail the advent of Christmas. West indeed is Australia I Remote from all those broils which embitter life, and make man akin to the Furies, the horrors of war have never plagued our quiet shores. Peace, with her olive, has been a perennial guest with us ; and, whilst many parts of the earth have, during the past year, suffered from plagues and afflictions, Calamity has passed us by as though uncon Fcioua of our existence. Christmas ! Season of mild mirthfulnexs and mellow jollity I Good time, beloved of all men ! when the twelvemo...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

Jfc — — — - — — — ff^TNG Boft across the dying day, |r*r Angelus 1 |j \i Across the amber-tinted bay, The meadow fluxhed with sunset ray ; Ring out and float aud melt away — Angelus ! The day of toil seems long ago, Angelus I While through the deepening vesper glow, Far up where holy lilies j blow, rfT Thy beek'ningbell notes /. \* li. rise and Bow- .*' \jMr Angelus I / r^^^lS Through dazzling eur- _^T /^fe*2 tains of the West. '^ J W Weeeeashrineinroses -^^\!%!8l«i dressed, *--TySri*_r And lifted high in vision -#PT blest, 6 . -W Our very heart-throb is ^J^©! '/.-A confessed- *2$ta.ff| Angelus I ^^£05 \ Oh.hasanangeltouohed h-1 t mm W the bell? c^MSBJB Angelus I S ffsBi For now upon its part- ---/y ^g&a ing swell K 'Tt??^ All sorrow seems to sing J ?'?W' farewell j ' f=^| There falls a peace no ' ?' Jj&ii wordB can tell — .^J^r3' Ancel us !

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A "NEW" WOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

A 'NEW' WOUIAh. ' You talk of marriage as if it were some thing to be dreaded ; you might be going to be hanged, lass, instead of married,' he said, angrily, easting wrathful looks at the curly head of a young girl who stood at the window. She was pinning a fly down by one wine as if the fate of a nation hnno on its escape. ' Wait a minute, wait a minute, Jack. This fly represents me if I marry yon pinned down, can't get away. See how it struggles ; and it never wanted to go till it felt itself bound ! ' and a merry shout of laughter rang out across the garden. The fly flew off, and the curly head turned round and revealed a mischievous pair of blue eyes and naughty, petulent lips, which contrasted oddly with the words the girl spoke. '1 do want my freedom, and I don't want to be tied down to humdrum matri mony, even with you, dear old boy. I like being engaged, and we agree so well (especially in letters !) but you see, Jack, women have altered now, and one hears so much against ma...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LITERARY CURIOSITY. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

LITERARY CURIOSITY. A lady occupied a whole year in searching ?'or, and fitting the following thirty-eight JineB from English and American poets. Che who'e reads as if written at one time and by one author — LIFE. Why All this toil for triumphs of an hoar! — Young. Life's a short summer ; man is but a flower. — Dr. Johnson. 3y turns we catch the fatal breath and die. —Pope. The cradle and the tomb, alaa I so nigh. — Prior. To be is better than not to be. — SeuieU. Though all man's life may seem a tragedy. — Spencer. But light cares speak when mighty griefs are dumb. — Daniel. The bottom is but shallow whence they come. —Sir Walter ScoU. Your fate but the common fate of all. — Longjellow. Unmingled joys here do no man befall. — Southwell. SJature to each allots its proper sphere. — Oongreve. Fortune makes follies her peculiar care. —Churchill. Custom does often reason overrule. — Rochester. And throw a cruel sunshine on a fool. — Armstrong. Live well— how long or short permit to .^ h...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE MAGNETIC CARD. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

THE MAGNETIC CARD. If we should tell you that a postal card may be turned into a magnet, you would be surprised, no doubt, and yot it is true. Let us tell you how to do it. The experiment that we are going to describe should not be made in damn weather. Balunce a walking 6tick oil the back of a chair and tell tlie spectators that you are goiug to make it fall without touching it or the chair. Having thoroughly dried a post-oard, preferably before an open fire, rub it briskly on your sleevs and then hold it near one end of the stick. The stick will at once be attraoted to the oard, and will follow it as if it were a magnet. As it moves it will soon lose its equilibrium and fall from the ehair. Almost any kind of wooden rod will do instead of the walking-stick, and almost any kind of card. Of course, you under stand the principle of the experiment. By rubbing the card you waken electricity in it, and it thuB becomes a sort of mag net, with the power to attraot light bodieB.

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRY THIS EXPERIMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

TRY THIS EXPERIMENT. Take two heated matcheB and stick them into the centre of a candle, at right angles to the wick, which ehould be left exposed at both ends. Then rest the ptnB on me eages 01 two wiuugiasses, ana trim the candles to balance. Light the wicks, and beyond the flames at each end, by means of a piece of wire, fasten two little figures with their joints - !? hinged 1 Now, as the candle begins to melt, a drop of grease will fall from one end (it is advisnbk-, by the way, to put something beneath to catch in it), and that end of bhe candle will rise a little above the Dther. Then a drop will fall from the opposite end, and a gentlo osoillationwill begin, which gradually increases in speed until the little figureB at the end will perform tho rooBt surprising antios at their game of soe-saw.

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
In Letters of Blood (All Rights Reserved.) [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

In Letters of Blood By Edward Bevan. (AU Kights Bescivcd.) 'That's a jolly nice girl old Boreham's brought up with him,' said George Manby to himself as he turned into his blankets, ' but I'm dashed if I like the way in which that I fill ft W Parrot hnnrra vnnmi Vtni* ? r»n«fnnnrl him ! The old man's niece too. She'll pro bably get a good slice of his money, and that's what my noble loafer is after. It I'd not had such infernal luck I'd have a try for her mysell. But a stockman 1 Why she wouldn't look at me, much less marry me Heigh-ho ! I wonder when it will all end.' And the young fellow stretched himself out, covered his head with iiis blanket to keep off the mosquitoes, and proceeded lo sleep. No doubt he felt his position keenly, for he was born of wealthy parents, hud received a good education, an j bad never known what it was to want, until, having dissipated the little money he inherited when he came of age, he was packed off to Australia by his father, with twenty pounds to...

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR CHRISTMAS [Newspaper Article] — The Carcoar Chronicle — 19 February 1896

OUR CHRISTMAS CAROL, O lad (£Rrislmas«tide f when old and youag unite, To Kail iis advent with sincere delight; Ifor while the old past revels can recall, The young look forward to the 'Festival. jf~ang out the Bulling — deck, the house -with flowers, £et ^Nature help to joyful make the hours ; INo matter what the speech, or where the clime, vi^ll (Lhrislendem rejoices in the time. Jy! ay rich arid poor each other keep in mind, The one be grateful and the other kind ; £-o shall this Christmas fade into the past, si^nd leave sweet memories- which shall years cullast

Publication Title: Carcoar Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x