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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Three Tailored COATS, Flared FROCK and TINY Model Fashion Service and Free PATTERN [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Three Tailored COATS, Flared FROCK and TINY Model Fashion Service and   Free PATTERN   TAILORED coats present   something of a problem to the amateur seamstress, but armed with one of this week's patterns all difficulties will disap- pear. Printed velvet is suggested for the smartly flared frock, while the tiny tot will love the belted model. WX27.—Frock and three-quarter coat of wool-de- chine. Material required, three and three-eighth yards 36in. for coat, and five and three-eighth   yards 36in. for frock. To fit size 36in. bust. Other     izes, 32, 34, 38, and 40 in. bust. PAPER PAT- TERN, 1/1.   WX28.— Three-quarter coat of tweed. Material     required, four yards. 36in. To fit size 36in. bust.   Other sizes, 32, 34, 38, and 40 in. bust. PAPER   PATTERN. 1/1. WX31.—Frock of printed velvet, with pieced Magyar sleeves, forming puff at elbow...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BRAINWAVES! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

"NO woman can keep a secret,'' de- clared the man scornfully. "I don't know about that," retorted the woman. "I've kept my age a secret since I was twenty-six." "You'll let it out one day!" "Never," she exclaimed; "when a woman has kept a secret for twenty years, she can keep it for ever." Prize of 10/ to O. Jackson, 14 Warialda Street, West Kogarah. "HOW did you get that busted nose?" "I've been for a trip." "On a boat?" "No, on a banana skin." Conducted by L. W. Lower. "I'M a roughhouse merchant, I am. I've wrestled some of the toughest eggs on earth," says "Duke" Richins, American wrestler, just arrived in Sydney. All I can say in reply to that is, "Oh, boy! I'm a boarding-house merchant, I am. I've wrestled some of the toughest steaks on earth—Anne Howe!" "HOW good are you on the castanets?" asked the affable stranger of the swarthy young brunette. "No good." she replied; "my brothair he casta da net—catcha da fish. Me, I do-a-da scales wit' da knife." FIRST Chop: "I believe the...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
TO CONTRIBUTORS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

TO CONTRIBUTORS THE Editor of The Australian Wo- men's Weekly will gladly con- sider stories, articles, verse, para- graphs and photographs on any sub- ject of interest to women, and such contributions accepted will be paid   for. Payment will be facilitated   if contributors comply with the fol- lowing:   (a) Forward a clipping of matter pub- lished, gummed on to a sheet of note paper, showing date and page in which par. was published. (b) Give full name, address, and State. (c) Such claims to reach this office not later than the last Friday in each month. Payment for contributions claimed for will be made on the 15th of the month following publication. Unsuitable contributions will only be   returned if a stamped addressed envelope is forwarded. We shall take all reasonable care of MS, but will not be responsible for its preser- vation or transmission. Letters insufficiently stamped cannot be accepted. Special claim forms for con...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY THE CAMERA..... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

WOMEN'S NEWS AS TOLD BY THE CAMERA ..... IF YOL' can't guess this is George Bernard Shaw, photographed in an unconventional moment aboard the s.s. Empress of Britain during the liner's round the-world cruise. Mr. Shaw takes his bathing seriously, unlike most of his other interests. He usually doffs his shirt. At all events, he doesn't appear to have oi.c nere, not even a black one, despite the strikingly Hitleristic gesture. -Air Mail photo. ALL THE COLOR and romance ot the olden days of Merrie England and the country dances will live again on the night of July 19 at the Y.W.C.A. Hall, Liverpool Street, when members of the Girls' Depart- ment of the Y.W.C.A. will hold a May Day Festival. These charming young people will tell of the beauty of an English Spring, and interpret the Folk Dances .or the dav wnmen'= Wonklv photo the school in the beauti- ful grounds of Woodhall ^^äHäPlsr M Park in Hertfordshire do their lessons, eat their meals, and play their games naked in the picturesqu...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

THE HUB makes a Sensational Offer to KNITTERS Free! One Pair Erinoid Knitting Needles (Usually 1/-) and One Steel Crochet Hook (Usually 3d.) given with every purchase of 10 skeins of Sunbeam Super Wool. at 7½d. per skein Take Advantage of this FREE Offer! "Sunbeam" Super Wool is available in 2, 3 and 4—ply-suitable for all Knitted Wear. This quality is famous for its softness . . . its hard- wearing quality . . . and its ability to launder perfectly. Every possible colour, as well as Heather Mixtures, is available at this price—and Knitters will appreciate this sensational offer made by The Hub. The saving to you is equivalent to a reduction of 1/3 on 10 skeins. The Knitting Needles usually sell at 1/- per pair, and Steel       Crochet Hooks are usually sold at 3d each. These two     articles are given FREE to every purchaser of 10 skeins of this famous Wool, at per skein .... 7½d. This offer is exclusive to "Women's W...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
With a SCHOOLMA'AM in MALAYA [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

With a   SCHOOLMA'AM in MALAYA By PAULINE McQUILLEN When schoolbells ring in far-   away Penang there are hundreds of bright-faced little Malayan, Chinese, Indian and Eurasian boys and girls who have vivid memories of Miss Pauline Mc- Quillen, B.A., Dip. Ed., a brilliant Sydney girl, who has returned from Penang after being in the service of the Education Depart- ment of the Straits Settlement. SIX months class teaching in the Penang Government Girls' School was excellent training for the more arduous work of supervisor of music. It accustomed one to the distinctive and fascinating atmosphere of school-life in Malaya. Delightedly the eye took in the strange and colorful group of students—the magnolia-tinted faces, exquisitely formed hands, jet black hair (some of it mas- sacred by the permanent wave), and vivid Shanghai costumes of the Chinese girls. The brown face and bright sarong and badu of an occasional Malay. The incongruity of an Indian girl in Europ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FUNEREAL WEDDING [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

FUNEREAL WEDDING   MR. DUNCAN NEALE, 80, chemist, and veterinary surgeon, of Sherston, Chippenham, erected his own tombstone ten years ago. On the day the tomb- stone was completed, he married his old sweetheart and gave the clergyman in- structions about his funeral. QUEER NECKLACE A COLOMBO woman wears a live 18in. lizard as a neck ornament. WALKING along the streets of Lon- don one day, Henry Carey saw a young Londoner and his sweetheart on holiday, and this gave him the inspira- tion of the famous song, "Sally In Our Alley." * * * BELATED AWAKENING A DESERT snail from Egypt, believed to be dead, remained fixed to a tablet in the British Museum for four years. Then it woke up and came out of its shell.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
"A DINKUM AUSTRALIAN" Says PETER DAWSON [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

ANN HARDING, who is appearing with Leslie Howard and Myrna Loy in "The Animal Kingdom." "A DINKUM AUSTRALIAN" Says PETER DAWSON IF there's one thing that Peter Dawson   hates it is snobbery. He is an out-   and-out Australian in this regard. In a talk this week he related how musicians and singers were treated at musicales in big London homes not so many years ago. "The artists were always received in the servants' quarters, and had to wait there till required," said Peter. "One day a famous violinist, when thus treat- ed, gave a fine concert to the servants, and then went home!" * * * CONCLUDING his talk, Peter said:— "We've only got the one life to live, and a short life at that. It would be a poor thing to think that we didn't all do what we could to help each other along, and be decent to one another." * * * PETER DAWSON always describes himself as a "dinkum Aussie." And the Diggers at Rose Bay on Tuesday night roared a hearty endorsement of that claim ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
PRIVATE VIEWS WHO WANTS THIS SORTI OF THING? [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

PRIVATE VIEWS WHO WANTS THIS SORT OF THING? NOTHING is more aggravating to the ordinary picture-goer than to find a second-rate film at a first-rate theatre. Yet all the big houses do this sort of thing. Next week "20,000 Years in Sing Sing" is billed to appear at the Regent. We are assured that the author and adap-   tor have first-hand knowledge of prison life. What earthly use or interest or entertainment this first-hand knowledge is likely to be to Australian audiences we can't imagine. This is the type of American film which causes criticism of the American film producers, but the criticism should really go to the local exhibitors. It may be the type of picture that the Ameri- cans want. It is certainly not the type that Australians want. —Capitol. * * * "MIDSHIPMAID" SPEEDY action keeps Ian Hay's new farce, "Midshipmaid," continually at laughter boiling-point, so that if "Middle Watch" was to one's taste, this show should not be missed. The same ingredients are pr...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
DIABETES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

DIABETES ONE of the dis- eases that seem to be increasing is diabetes. Once the fate of a sufferer was not very hope- ful. Nowadays it depends very large- ly on the patient whether a complete recovery is made or not. Insulin has solved the problem, but, even to a greater degree, diet is the basis of the treatment. The diabetic must make up her mind that there are certain foodstuffs that she must just go without. There are plenty of alternative things. Diet can fix diabetes without the help of insulin in at least 50 per cent, of cases, according to an Australian doctor who recently gave his own hospital figures in a medi- cal journal article in order that his statement may be supported. To disobey the doctor's advice in diabetes will more than probably mean a severe penalty.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

What other ROOM HEATER POSSESSES these FEATURES ?     Supplies heat in an instant . . . . enables you to raise or lower the heat . . . . has nothing to get out of order . . . . warms the whole room . . . . does not dry the air or make it stuffy or uncomfortable . . . . ventilates as it warms and changes the air in the room as often as 6 times an hour . . . . gives off radiant heat—the most healthful of all forms of heat and also the most invigorating . . . . made in sizes and styles to suit every kind of fireplace . . . . is perfectly clean and does NOT give off fumes or odours . . . . costs as little as a 1¼d. an hour to run . . . . and is used by 90 per cent. of London hospitals and by 3 out of every 4 doctors in England. The modern gas fire puts room warming on a healthy basis ; it prevents chills, colds, sore throats and other aiolments caused by most other heaters; it sup- plies healthful, sunlike warmth   and ventilates as it warms. &...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

GRACE. BROS BARGAINS ^j^^g^g^AM^ Chihh-Jñ-s Wer OÍ/J/I e~ . * * V^ $Q mamu ßaywq ßatpain**. ^ w ?» S^íf Z¿\ f^^P ?M^MMMMÍ NIGHTIES, sleeveless, and « i H, - TODDLERS' 15.-INFANTS' AND J / / /T V,'^^^M^ -<y^BHHnMl with a dainty pocket and MIBHMIHHBk pp 7* wool. JERSEY BUS- TODDLERS' VIYELLA î / \£Í I |f^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ sas}i Usual price 31/6 - V / « ¿, TER SUITS. Cream SUITS, made with fine li <*W ^'8ír$? f > ^T*"" "^t SALE PRICE, ^ HI ;¿ f^< Shirts. Coloured Pants. smockings, and long H im $ W*f I ' (II <6*\ EM* ....Zrf/O - ,7*^^ feg size 20in. Usual Price sleeves. Usual Price, I f ^ ^ CA f 1 \ Lg Q^ln1 I 316- SALE PRICE 26/6- SALE PRICE 2.—NATURAL "KAN-                                 EBO" FUJI SILK NIGHT-   &nbs...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
DAD'S PAY and the LAW [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

DAD'S PAY and the LAW By A LAWYER   What does your husband do with his weekly pay envelope? Does he hand it to you in- tact, then deducting his weekly pocket money? What do you do with it? If you spend it all, there can be no legal trouble. But if you save some of it, and pay it into an account in your own name, there may be quite a lot after your death. The question is—to whom does it belong? IN this case, intentions, so often disre- garded by the law, are of impor- tance. You know what is the understand- ing. You are to run the house, clothe yourself and the kiddies, and the balance goes into the account. When your hus- band takes you all for a holiday, the money for expenses comes from the same source. If he wants a new suit, or a few extra pounds for any purpose, you cheerfully ask him how much, make a withdrawal, and hand it to him. Also, fearing the arrival of final notices for rates on the house, for gas, or electric light (all of which are in his   ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HOLLYWOOD'S PERFECT ROMANCE Is To END! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

HOLLYWOOD'S PERFECT ROMANCE Is To END! By SAIDE   Mary Pickford — "the world's sweetheart" "leading lady of Hollywood society" "Queen of the Talkies" the beautiful star with a score of the most extravagant titles to which her admirers through- out the world could give voice —wants a divorce from Doug- las Fairbanks, senr. And so Hollywood's "perfect" ro- mance is to end! MARY PICKFORD has been known and loved by every- one since the days when she wore long golden curls and played the ingenue. The winning of world- wide popularity contests proved but the stepping stone to even deeper thrills for her admirers when the lovely Mary married Douglas Fairbanks, Senr. To the plaudits of fans throughout the world, Hollywood had staged its perfect romance. Neither Mary nor Doug, was young. Both were completely hardened to public adulation, and it was felt that in Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks the talkie world could point to a marriage that would last, an exemplary union that wou...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
things that happen SING CUCKOO [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

SING CUCKOO THE call of an English cuckoo, heard in our neighborhood recently, aroused the interest of two friends of mine from the Old Country. They were doubtful whether cuckoos had been ac- climatised to Victorian conditions, but, on making inquiries, discovered that, some time ago, four birds had been re- leased. After that they enjoyed the cuckoo's call without suspicion, until one clear night, after they had come back from a theatre, they were sur- prised to hear it cuckoo exactly twelve times. The people next door had bought a cuckoo clock. 10/ to Grace I. Livingstone, c/o 12 Darling St., South Yarra, S.E.1, Vic. * * * WOMEN DRIVERS ARE CAREFUL AT a very busy intersection in our city,   bystanders were much amused the other day at a woman pedestrian cross- ing the road. She was evidently used to driving a car for, when half-way across, she put her arm out at full length, and wheeled round. She did it quite unknowingly, and could not make out what everyone was smi...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

BEFORE THE MIRROR (BY "JEANNETTE") A BEAUTIFUL COMPLEXION BY NATUBAL MEANS The secret of a perfect complexion lies in the continual renewing of the outer cuticle of the skin. This is Nature's own method. The outer skin as it becomes coarse or shrivelled must be removed, and an oppor- tunity given to the finer one beneath to show itself. It is because the old, dead skin is allowed to remain on the face that so many women, and even young girls, suffer from pimples, blotches, and sallow, dull skins. To remove, by absorption, the dead, outer skin, and with it all blemishes, the use of mercolized wax is universally recommended, ordinary face creams being powerless for this purpose. Smear the wax over the face and neck, rub it gently into the skin, and leave it on all night. In the morning wash it off, using Pilenta soap and warm water, when all the dead skin will be removed with the wax. Then apply a lotion to give a peach-like bloom to the skin. A lotion to do this can be made up from t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SOME SUGGESTIONS About "NERVES" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

SOME SUGGESTIONS About "NERVES" "SO-AND-SO has nerves!" A com- monplace remark nowadays! Yet we nearly always regard it seriously. While we recognise that nerves are an essential part of our physical make-up and control the entire mechanism, we do not accept the sentence in its literal form. On the contrary, we incline a sympathetic ear and interpret it to mean that the unfortunate "So-and- so" is suffering from some sort of ner- vous disorder. "No wonder," we think, with a glow of that fellow feeling that makes the whole world kin. "No wonder," we re- peat with emphasis, "in these dark days of economic depression"—and at this point our minds are apt to wander off to our own difficulties and to contem- plate the combined causes that have brought about our own attacks of "nerves" at various times. Memory and imagination assist us here and strike responsive chords in the gamut of human emotions. The mind fastens on to thoughts of a worrying nature, starting, perhaps, with irritability...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
When Love Fades Problems of Life [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

When Love Fades Problems of Life By the MATRON IF you felt that the man you loved was drifting away from you, what would you do? To "Marion," Moss Vale, this question has become a vital problem, and she has written to me for advice. She feels that another woman is supplanting her in her husband's affections. "Marion," you are certainly in a very unfortunate position. I wish I could help you in a more practical way than by a few words of sympathy and advice, but at least I can understand your feelings and the dilemma in which you are placed. It is a sad thing, after all the years you have lived happily with your hus- band, to find his affections straying and his thoughts concentrated on another woman, but you must try to take com- fort from the fact that these violent fancies of middle life are apt to die a sudden death. Many men at your hus- band's age lose their heads and believe they have lost their hearts, but in com- paratively few cases do their "affairs" end seriously, especia...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE FASHION PARAD DESIGNS in Flattering DESIGNS in Flattering Color COMBINATIONS PRINTS Head the Paris FASHIONS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

DESIGNS in Flattering     Color COMBINATIONS PRINTS Head the Paris FASHIONS   BY JESSIE TAIT An evening gown in grey-and- white foulard, with a feather motif. A nice contrast it given by black and white cire ribbon. Gloves made of the same pritit as the dress. A daisy print in yellow, blue and red, on a white ground, fashions this dress. It shows the classic draped sleeve. The red cire sash winds round and ties with a bow and long ends. Mainbocher's plaid taffeta, in red and blue, on a white ground. Note how full the dress is in the back, and the little coat with matching fulness.   PRINTS, having been   declared THE thing by the big Paris designers this spring, are being used for many other items as well as for dresses. It is the last word in "chic" to wear printed slip-on gloves to match your dress or suit, printed shoes and hats also matching the clothes you wear. Prints are discreetly decorative, and are carefully ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
OUR PARIS SNAPSHOTS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

OUR PARIS SNAPSHOTS   DEAD black transparent frocks for evening, often trimmed with narrow lace ruffles, are a part of Chanel's col- lection, and pure white evening dresses made of tulle, lace, or silk organdie are another. O O O HERE and there in Paris the longer skirts that are shown for formal wear are split into petals below the knees so the legs show now and again. OOO SCHIAPARELLI'S dark eel grey is being worn by some of the smart- est women in Paris. It is usually com- bined with red. OOO THE outstanding evening wraps for summer are pure white, and are made of satin, ermine, or velvet. OOO GIRLS with a head for "chic" are wear-     ing their hair brushed back, and banked high with curls at the back. Combs and metal circlets are permitted to keep it in place. OOO SOMETHING unusual at summer evening fashions is the full-length evening scarf of pale blue wool, with matching gloves, from Molyneux, which is worn with a white chiffon frock. GL...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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