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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LATEST STEP TO SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

LATEST STEP TO SOCIETY.   Just as by the advent of "bridge" a lady might   become a favorite in the smartest society, pro-     vided she was a finished player, so a young man   of doubtful antecedents and a character whose   prominent features are chiefly negative, and who   is destitute of prospects or influence, is fought   over by the most reputable hostesses in London if   only a consummate master of ping-pong.—   "Sketch."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Complete Short Story. THE BIRTHDAY PRESENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Complete Short Story. THE BIRTHDAY PRESENT.     —♦—       It was a big shop, with big beautiful windows wherein were writing-cases of polished green morocco, letter-cases of sweet-smelling Russian leather, cigar-cases of manly and even blood thirsty crocodile—every kind of case in every kind of material; there were miniature silver candlesticks for your writing-table holding red wax candlecules, there were thick sticks of sealing-wax in the palest heliotrope to be used in conjunction with them; there were calendars, and lamps, and dressing-cases and hunting flasks, and gun-metal pencils for the pocket. It was really a good shop, one which justified the placard which appeared in every one of the vast plateglass windows:— BIRTHDAY PRESENTS IN GREAT VARIETY. A beautifully-dressed school girl with slim black legs and a red jacket and big thoughtful eyes, stood and stared iuto the window. As she gazed her eyes became still ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOST FOLKS FIND THEIR LEVEL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

MOST FOLKS FIND THEIR LEVEL. "When ye kind o' git t' thinkin'     You're the whole endurin' thing,     When ye think th' world must have ye—     Same's a kite must have a string—     Then it's time t' fix fer dodgin'     An' begin t' look aroun'—     'Cause they's somepin goin' t' hit ye     That'll surely take ye down.     When ye git t' livin' reg'lar     Way up in th' upper air,     An' when folks without no field glass     Couldn't sight ye anywhere,     Then it's time t' git yer parachute     And see't it's workin' right,     While ye glance t'ward terry firmy,     Pickin'out a place t'light. &a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A TRADE DISCLOSURES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A TRADE DISCLOSURE. Certain tailoring firms buy foreign-made goods     and palm them off as English made. There are,     in the best-known circles of tailoring, a number     of employers who, to-day, are carrying out this     disastrous policy, cutting their own throats and     doing their level best to destroy the prestige of     English tailoring. When they have succeeded in     this perhaps they will blame the journeyman!—     "Tailor and cutter."      

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Man's Experience OF THE FIRST YEAR OF MARRIED LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A Man's Experience OF THE FIRST YEAR OF MARRIED LIFE. It hardly seems like a year ago since I was married to Jane, but it is. Just a year ago this Christmas! Well, well! And it looks like three years! Who ever would have thought that the time could drag along so slowly? I suppose it's only a year, though it certainly feels longer. What a splendid time we had on our two weeks' honeymoon too! Why, we were like a couple of turtle-doves. She couldn't do enough for me nor I for her. And the dear girl positively wouldn't let me spend any money on her. She said I must not waste my hard-earned pounds on her. Hegho! how women do change! And then she refused to have anything or buy anything that I didn't like, and would persist in my having my own way in everything, and I naturally preferred to do as she pleased, and always wanted to surrender my own will to hers. I believe that mutual feeling lasted for nearly two months; but, great Scot, how some people can change! At that time she said she...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CREEDS AND TRADES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

CREEDS AND TRADES. Certain creeds seem to monopolise certain in- dustries. Practically all British manufacturers of cocoa, for example, are Quakers. Then, in London at any rate, a very large percentage of cigar merchants and all the best-known manufac- turers of Christmas cards are Jews. Whenever a Welshman comes to London to seek his fortune it is long odds on his making his pile either in the draper's or drag store business. Irishmen, probably owing to the fact that they lack the money-making instinct, flock to journalism.— "Tatler."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Everybody SHOULD KNOW THIS. TO TAKE RUST OFF STEEL FIREIRONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Everybody SHOULD KNOW THIS.     TO TAKE RUST OFF STEEL FIREIRONS.   Cover the steel with sweet oil, and rub it in   thoroughly. After 48 hours use finely-powdered   unslacked lime, and rub until all rust disap- pears. Steel fenders should be polished daily   with a leather to prevent rust forming.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO REMOVE CANDLE GREASE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

TO REMOVE CANDLE GREASE.   Few things are better than a hot iron held over the spot, first scraping off any of the grease that is on the surface. If the cloth is smooth, put a piece of blotting-paper over the spot, and touch it with a hot iron. Change the surface of the blotting-paper over the spot till no trace of grease is left.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO CLARIFY HOME-MADE WINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

TO CLARIFY HOME-MADE WINE.   Dissolve two ounces of best isinglass in a small quantity of the wine to be fined, and set it near the fire for a day or two. Then beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth; take out half a gallon of the wine, mix all together, and put into the barrel. Let this stand for one day, then stop it up, and after three weeks it should be fine. The above quantities are meant tor a nine gallon cask.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO CLEAN WINDOWS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

T0 CLEAN WINDOWS. Dissolve a little household ammonia in the water to be used, rinse the leathers in this, and all dirt will be quickly removed without the usual amount of rubbing. Afterwards use dry cloths, and on them a little kerosene.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LIME-WATER FOR BABIES [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

LIME-WATER FOR BABIES Made as follows, will cost less than half as much as when bought: Put half-an-ounce of slaked lime into a stoppered bottle, and on it pour two pints of water. Shake well for two   or three minutes. Allow all to stand till the sedi- ment has completely fallen to the bottom, and then draw off the clear liquid into a well- stoppcred bottle for use.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE.   Place whole green tomatoes after removing   their stalks in salt and water, leaving them there. for three days; then wipe perfectly dry, and set in a stone jar. Boil enough white wine vinegar   to cover them with the following proportion of   spices, etc., to each quart of vinegar. One   ounce of ginger, quarter of an ounce of allspice,   six cloves, two blades of mace, one capsicum,   half-an-ounce of whole black pepper. Boil all   for 10 minutes, then pour at once on the toma- toes; place a saucer over the mouth of the   jar, and let it remain in a warm place all night. Next day carefully strain off the vinegar,   add two ounces green nasturtium seeds to the tomatoes, boil the vinegar again for two minutes and pour hot over the pickle. When cold, tie   closely down, and keep in a dry place for three   or ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PURIFYING DRINKING WATER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PURIFYING DRINKING WATER. In a recent discussion in the Royal United Ser- vice Institution on "The Abolition of Typhoid Fever from the Army," Dr. Rideal gave some in- teresting facts respecting filters and chemicals for the sterilisation of drinking water.   The essential fact, so far as South African ex- perience goes, is that the filters became instantly clogged. With clear water they might have been efficient, but they were of no use with the turbid fluid which the British troops had to put up with in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. Dr. Parkes and Dr. Rideal have experimented with bisulphate of soda; a very small quantity of which is said ta kill the typhoid germ, and "the salt is being tried on a considerable scale in South Africa." It does not appear from the official statistics of deaths in the South African service from ty- phoid that the bisulphate of soda experiment has been completely successful, but perhaps it has not yet had a fair trial. Soldiers are...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO HEIR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

NO HEIR.     "Is he broke?"     "I guess so. He said if air was 2½d a barrel,   he'd suffocate."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOME BRIGHT THINGS. TO LET OFF BURING DINNER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

SOME BRIGHT THINGS.   TO LET OFF DURING DINNER. —♦— Some husbands are domestic, and some are im-   ported.   There is an ounce of wisdom at the root of every   grey hair.     When a man is hopelessly in love, it greatly   increases his sighs.   A man's character is often shown by what he   considers laughable.   If a young woman bids you take heart, you can   probably take hers.   No invention, we think, ever caused quite so   much talk as the telephone.   If in doubt about an experiment, get some   other fellow to try it first. A man seldom gets so full of emotion that he has no room for dinner.   The only woman a man has a perfect right to   dictate to is his pretty typine.   The love that is dumb until it speaks on a   tombstone is not w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MEN BORN AFTER THEIR MOTHERS' BURIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

MEN BORN AFTER THEIR MOTHERS' BURIAL. Incredible though it may appear, it is never- theless a fact that more than one celebrated personage was actually born after the burial of his own mother, as the following authentic inci- dents will amply attest. Ebenezer Erskine, one of the founders of the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland, was born after the burial of his mother. Mrs. Erskine was buried in a trance, and on one of her fingers was a valuable ring. The gravedigger knew of this, opened the coffin, and was in the act of cut- ting off the ring-bearing finger when Mrs. Erskine awoke with a cry. She rose, walked home, and went upstairs without having encountered any of her family. The footsteps overhead caused her husband to remark, "If I didna' ken my wife was lyin' in the kirk-yard, I wad say that wis her fitstep." Mrs Erskine lived to become the mother of Ebenezer. It ie not generally known that General Lee, the notorious leader of the Southern forces during the American Civil...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TEA SEED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

TEA SEED. —♦— Tea seed, a by-product of an important indus- try, is awaiting profitable use. It was placed upon the market in London in 1886, under the name of "tanne," but nobody knew what to do with it, and there was no sale. An agent of the Indian Tea Association has now made a report upon the oil and cake. Tea-seed oil is clear, light, and yellow, with a more or less acrid taste, and is unsafe as an edible oil on account of its saponin. Tea-seed oil-cake is by the same con- stituent made dangerous food for cattle, while as a manure it is much inferior to other oil-seed cakes. It Is suggested that the oil might prove useful as lamp oil, and that the cake might serve an an insecticide.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PURIFYING MILK BY PRESSURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PURIFYING MILK BY PRESSURE. After aerated milk, sterilised milk, pepton- ised milk, lactated milk, and malted milk, there is now to be added a new kind of scientific hy- gienic milk. This is compressed milk. By a new process the microbes that abound in cow's milk are squeezed to death, at least a part of them are, for there are about 500,000 germs to every tea- spoonful of unboiled cow's milk. To investigate the effect of pressure on bac- teria, an apparatus has been devised which is remarkable for having produced what is prob- ably the greatest hydrostatic pressure ever reached, over 450,000lbs. per square inch. The particular object of these experiments was to determine whether the bacteria in milk might not be kill by hydrostatic pressure, so that it would keep a longer time without going sour. Moderate pressures were first tried, but ap- peared to have no effect. The pressures were then increased, and notable results were ob- tained. Milk subjected to pressures of 70 to 100 tons...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUBMARINES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

SUBMARINES.   —♦—   The maritime problems of war do not require that the submarines should have the power of compassing a great distance at considerable depths; they need not have the properties of the   Nautilus of Jules Verne, but it is absolutely   necessary that such vessels, when navigating   on the surface, should have a speed not much   less than ordinary torpedo-boats, and that they   should, in addition to this, be able to continue   their course beneath the surface, at a depth of   16ft. or 20ft., when occasion requires.   The necessity for diving will only arise at   particular crises of an action, perhaps five or six   times in half an hour. For navigating on the   surface, a submarine should have a radius of   action of from 300 to 400 miles; it should also have the power of passing easily f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GO AT ONCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

GO AT ONCE. Mrs, Dash: "James, I've been asked to join the Women's Improvement Association. Mr. Dash: "Put on your hat and go at once, my dear." —Syracuse "Herald."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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