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Title: Illinois Farmer Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,057 items from Illinois Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Hedging for Open Prairies . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Hedging for Open Prairies . We like an article on this subject in the Chicago . Press and Tribune , written by Hon . L . Dunlap , in reply to a correspondent . He says that the land for hedges should be dry and rolling ; it should be well prepared for receiving the plants ; these plants should be two years old ; should be planted six inches apart , and should he suffered to grow without being cut back or trimming . Hedges thus planted will grow up some fifteen or twenty feet , and will be a perfect protection against stock , and will also break the prairie winds to some extent . If the hedges are to be cut hack , we have been in favor of setting the plants three or four inches apart ; but if they are suffered to grow , they will make small trees , and should have more distance . ggyPremium lists for the State Fair for 1859 , will be ready for distribution by the 10 th of April . They will be sent to the Presidents and officers of all the county Agricultural Societies in the State ; ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Who Wants a Fine Currant Bush . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Who Wants a Fine Currant Bush . You may have one , or as many as you like , in this way . Find out who has some Refl Dutch or White Dutch Currants : they are much better than the common red and white currants . Go to them and ask for a few cuttings , or go to a nursery and buy a few , and , if you take a fancy to some other kinds , for instance , to some of those line new kinds several of which every good nurseryman ought to have , such as the White Grape White Transparent , Fertile of Pallua , Cherry , and others . When you have the cuttings , ( they should be about a foot long ) , take a sharp knife , and out all the buds out from more than half the lower part , taking care not to tear the bark , nor cut any more than just enough to take the buds out ; then put them away Wrapped in paper , and buried in some earth in the cellar till early spring . As soon as earth is mellow set them out .- They may be simply stuck up in the mellow soil , after it is spaded , and the weeds and gras...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Draining Improves the Quality of Crops [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Draining Improves the Quality of Crops That the productive power of the soil is largely increased by draining in cases of retentive lands , has often been noticed ; few , however , have remarked upon the improvement in the quality of the crop effected by the same process . Mr . French , in his essay on drainage , gives a brief paragraph on the subject , so pertinent and conclusive that we copy it here . In a dry season , he says , we frequently hear the farmer boast of the quality of his products . His hay crop is light , but will spend much better than the crop of a wet season—his potatoes are not large , hut they are sound and meal y , —and so of other crops . Every farmer knows that his wheat and corn are heavier and more nutritive where grown upon land sufficiently drained . The deepened soil in which manures have their full effect—the season not shortened at both ends by the presence of stagnant water in the soil—the mellow , porous seed or rootbed , not affected by draught or ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Noble Premiums . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Noble Premiums . The Mass . Society for Promotion of Agriculture offers two premiums of extraordinary liberality . FOB THE BEST PLANTATION OP FOKEST TUBES , § 1000 . — The above sum is offered for the best plantation of trees , of any kind commonly usedfor , and adapted to , ship building , grown from seed planted for the purpose , or otherwise , on not less than five acres of land , one white oak , at least , to be planted to every twenty square yards . Notice in writing must be given to the Secretary of the Society , on or before January 1 , 1860 , of the intention to compete for the premium , statingwhere theland is situated the nature of the soil , and what has been done in relation to the plantation up to the time of giving notice . The premium will be awarded in 1870 , in case the success of any competitor has been such as , in the opinion of the Trustees , or of those appointed by them to adjudge the same , or give a reasonable probability that the plantation will produce eve...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Braining on the Prairie . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Braining on the Prairie . There are many truths in the following article : While upon the subject of the weather and particularly wet weather , I wish to confess my entire conversion to the doctrines of the advocates of thorough drainage—I mean as a grand national measure , called for and demanded by the nature of soil and the extreme humidity of our climate , referring especially to the season for farming operations . I have read everything that has fallen in my way for several years on this subject but while admitting its application to several localities , have been skeptical as to its general value . Observation , connected with the digging of a cellar on ground supposed to be as dry as land ever gets to be , has opened my eyes , and I now firmly believe that the time is not far distant when thorough drainage will be considered the sheet anchor of western agriculture . Our lands are rich enough , but in a country where sixteen inches of water can fall in a single month , and not...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Who Wants a Grape Tine ? [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Who Wants a Grape Tine ? Boys , do you want to sit under the shade of your own vine and eat the fruit of it before you are three years older 1 If so , get some grape-buttings either now or before the sap starts . Tour father or elder brother will get them for you , and do you keep them hurried in the earth in the cellar , where they will not freeze , till warm , pleasant gardening weather in May , then you can set them out , and they will each , or most of them , form a grape vine . Select the best kind , such as the Diana , Hartford Prolific or Concord , if you can get these kinds , otherwise take the Isabella . This last named grape is not sure to ripen in the northern parts of this State , except in very warm exposures , and there are kinds of Isabellas which ripen earlier than others , so select these to get cuttings from . There is not a boy or girl either who reads and understands this , who may not raise this summer from the cuttings obtained at this season several fine grape...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Spring Business [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Spring Business We notice that some of the papers are predicting a flourishing spring business ? What is to make a flourishing spring business ? It is the selling of goods in a country already drained of money , for goods , and indebted for them to an amount of thousands upon thousands which cannot he paid ? That will not make a flourishing business . A flourishing business which we desire is , to see our farmers preparing their grounds well , and putting in the seed of oats and barrley and spring wheat ;—and then again planting their corn and potatoes—increasing their stock—and working with a will to raakc fine crops , by which to pay their debts , and which will pay the debts of merchants to their credors . That is tho business we wish to see : and it behooves every farmer to do his best to transact this flourishing business . Many of these debts mi ght have been avoided . They never need to have been contracted . We have been too extravagant . We have not practiced economy . The ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Items . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Items . The Wilmington ( N . C . ) Journal predicts that there will be no rain in May . We can tell better after May shall have passed . It is said that wool is falling in price in the Chicago market . Many farmers would make money by selling off a portion of their farms . If that cannot be done , would they not find advantage in disposing of portions of their farms for a term of years at a nominal price ? Flour and Wheat are in as good demand for consumption in the West as in the Eastern Markets . The falling off of the Wheat crops last year in the United States is estimated at ei ght millions of bushels . We continue to learn favorable accounts of a portion of the new wheat crops . In Southern Illinois it never looked better . The valuable horse Bellfounder , lately the property of J . Stockdale , deceased , of this county , has been purchased by L . M . Wilson , of Alabama . Unquestionabl y as a Roadster for all work , he is one of the best horses in the United States . We regret...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Valuable Beetipes . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Valuable Beetipes . WARTS . —Rub them with fresh beef every day until they begin to disappear . FOR A STING . —Bind on the place a thick plaster of salt moistened . RING WORMS . —Take tobano and boil well , add Vinegar and lye and wash often . BURNS . —Mix one part essence of Peppermint and three of whiskey , and apply with cloths . To PREVENT BRUISES PROM TURNING : BLACK . —Make a plaster of salt and tallow and cover the wound . BOILS . —If very painful , apply a poultice of bread and milk .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Set out Orchards . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Set out Orchards . Editor of tlie Farmer : We are now enjoying favorable weather and , like all others , I ardently hope it will continue . Some farmers who have dry land , are already plowing for spring wheat and oats and before your paper is issued , there will be large amounts of ground sown with these grains . Considering the demands of the country—and considering the condition of the country , it is hoped that our farmers will put in all the crops possible and to the extent possible . The country is bare of oats , wheat , barley , corn and potatoes—never so bare before , at this season of the year in my recollection . I set out with the design of saying a few words on the subject of planting orchards . We are somewhat discouraged on this subject : The few last years of unusual weather has been destructive to our orchards . Many of those which yielded fruit in abundance , and of which we were proud , cannot now be found . It is thought , that orchards planted on similar land , w...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The Dairy . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

The Dairy . EDITOR OP THE FARMER : —I was glad to notice in your last number an exhortation to farmers on the subject of the Dairy . It is a fact known to all , that except a small portion of the year , when . it is too late to keep butter without one has an ice house or othoj . conveniences for doing BO , good butter is scarce in market . I say good butter ; for a very small proportion of the butter brought to our markets from the couutry is it . No . 1 . We have better butter from New York and Ohio in winter than we find made in the country . It can be brought a thousand miles —subject to all sorts of handling and then is greatly superior to the home manufactur ed . I do not say that good butter is no * made here ; for I know that we have some excellent butter makers ; but I speak of a large portion of them . Now the fact that some families here make the best kind of Butter ; that they get the uniform price of twenty-five cents a pound for it during the whole year ; that they make...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
**• Suggestions to Growers of Cane . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

**• Suggestions to Growers of Cane . 1 st . Select the highest and dryest land , bordering upon sand , marl or clay , and avoid as much as possible the black prairie muck , which grows a large , coarse cane , not very sweet , and is later in ripening . 2 d . Plow deep and ridge the same as . for corn ; plant on the ridges from 3 to 3 £ feet each way , it being less trouble to tend than when drilled , and will produce as much juice . 3 d . Soak the seed in warm water until about ready to sprout ; plant as early as the ground will admit , and not . later than the last of May ; cover from 1-4 to 3-4 of ap inch deep ; cultivate two plants to a hill ; allow it to stool well ; keep it clean until about three feet high , when it will take care of itself . 4 th . When the seed becomes fully black and ripe , strip the leaves by hand or with a stick prepared for that purpose ( which is better ;) then cut off the tops below the upper joint , as all above injures the syrup ; then cut the standi...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Culture of the Onion , [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Culture of the Onion , EDS . COTIKTRY GENTLEMAN . —In your paper , Vol . XIII , No . 9 , are instructions about growing onions—some of which are very good ; others not BO good First it is well to have new seed , of the right kind—to he sure of this , grow it yourself , by selecting onions of the size and quality you wish to grow , and setting them out where they will flourish without any intermixture of the baser sorts . — Onions , like persons , aro known by the company they keep ; he , therefore , who would have his product pure , must be careful that they have no bad associates . Spare no pains in preparing the soil , pulverizing and fertilizing it well , and clearing the surface of all extraneous matter , so . that the seed may be evenl y distributed—in rows about fourteen inches apart , . and thick enough in the row to admit of the young plants being thinned , so as to leave them growing about two inches apart . No harm will accrue from their being thus thick ; this will enable...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
"totting flogs , " [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

totting flogs , Or m other words , to find the net weight when the gross weight is given , is to soine a difficult operation . Any one who can read figures , can see at a glance , by the following table , what the net weight of a hog is . The table is made from the Kentucky Rule , that is , for the first 100 lbs . deduct 22 lbs . for gross ; for the second 100 lbs . deduct 12 $ lbs . ; and for the third 100 lbs . deduct 6 * . All over the third hundred is net . Pounds- lbs Oz . 100 gross will net , 75 105 ....... „ .,.. „ „ . 79 6 110 «* 8 $ 12 116 98 2 130 « 93 8 125 „ 86 U 130 ¦ „ .. 10 t 4 135 . 105 10 140 « • „ „ — .. 110 145 « _ —U 4 6 ISO ™ . 118 12 15 * - 123 2 180 ™ . « . „ . 137 8 ins » „„ . m H 170 « « „ 139 4 175 u ...- - . » . 140 10 180 » .. . 143 185 » „ • .. !« « WO *? « ........ 158 12 2 tt > « . 158 I 205 *• „ 162 8 210 . . . 167 3 216 «< 174 14 2 « « « ™ ? . ^ . * . . . r . ! r . r ... . v . ! ™ ™ . j 82 4 230 ¦ * _ ~ ....- —185 15 235 . 190 1...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Some of Franklin ' s Maxims . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

Some of Franklin s Maxims . He that by the plow would thrive , HjmselTmust either hold or drive . The following from the pen of the great American philosopher , Dr . Franklin , should be printed in letters of gold , and hung up in every schoolroom , side b y side with the usual a-b ab dog latin , and other nonsense with which our children s minds are crammed , and which seems to be the rule in our modern system of tuttion . There will be a time when a professorship of political economy will be considered as absolutely necessary to every school . But that time is not yet . At present we have nothing but profusion and shameful waste , on the one hand , while abject poverty , meanness of spirit and total carelessness , is too much observable on the other . These are the two extremes which characterize our present false state of things in a physical point of view—all laid to the score of false training , from the highest to the lowest . But hear what Poor Richard says : 1 . Plow deep wh...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
FEEIM : iTJ y : s [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

FEEIM : iTJ y : s LIST OF 1 t > Bl AWliIlMtB kl TUB mit EXHIBITION * r THE PQMOLOGICAl AMD HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY Or flOOTHESlf IUIKOfS , To be held at Jonesboro , in Union County , May 31 and June 1 , 1859 . * ar * During the forenoon of tho first day , none but axhib Itors or members of ft Warding commit teas will be admit tod . The evening at • ach day vill be devoted to the discussion of poroological and horticultural subjects . All , whether living within the boundaries of tho society or not , are Invited to compete for premiums . Where agricultural or horticultural books or papers are awarded as premiums , should the recipients be , already , 1 , subscribers to Paid papers . or have received the same in some other award , permission will be given to select from ths list some other book or paper of equal price . Magazines and papers , offered u premiums , will be sent for o » o Tear . When there an ao competitors , no premium wil be a wardad , unless the article exhib...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
State Pair Premiums fur Best Farms * Nurseries & c . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

State Pair Premiums fur Best Farms * Nurseries & c . OFFICE CosBBSPoin > mo SECBETAXT , 1 Epringfiield , April 1 , 1859 . J The following is a list of the premiums offered by the State Agricultural Society for the best farms , nurseries and groves which shall be enterei for competition . It is hoped that these entries will be numerous : For best Improved nnd highly cultivated farm , not less than 600 acres .. . Goto Medal Second best ... « .....-.... „ . „ $ 15 Best improved and highly cultivated farm , not less than 160 acres . . . . Gold Medal 2 nd best „ . 15 Best improved and highly cultivated farm , uot less than 40 acres „ Gold Medal 2 nd beet 15 Beat anangodand economically conducted prairie farm . „ _„„ . „ Gold Medal 2 nd beat .. „ . „ ,. 16 Beat grove of cultivated timber on tho prairie . ... Gold Medal 2 nd best , ^ .... Silv . Modal Best arranged and cultivated nnrsery of fruit and ornamental trees , shrubs and plants ..., — ... £ 30 2 nd best 10 J...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
COMMERCIAL . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

COMMERCIAL . St . Louis Market—March 26 . FLOOR—Ball . Sales 75 bbl-country single extra at $ 6 ; 50 bbta fnitry at $ 5 65 , and 654 bbls country double extra private . WHEAT— Steady . Sales 300 eke stumptall spring at 85 c CO ska poor full at 110 c ; 684 ska good spring ntll 6 @ 16 >« Jc ; 735 ska ordinary and common fall at 115 @ HGc ; 677 ska fair fall at ! 20 @ 122 c : 455 sks good fair 122 @ 123 c ; 143 eks good at 12 G @ l 2 Sc ; 12 sks prime at 130 c : 100 sks choice White 136 @ 138 c % bushel . CORN—Firm , with sales of 15 S sks poor white at 77 c ; 916 aks white , yellow and mixed , in lots , at 78 c J ISO sks white at 79 c ; 540 sks do at 80 c , and 960 sks white and yellow , private . OATi—Sales of 380 sks common at 65 c ; 381 sks ggodat T 2 J * J @ 73 c ; 50 sks prime at 75 c , including sks , and 77 ska choice at 75 c , ska returned . BARLEY ASD RYJS ^ -No sales of barley . A small lot of prime Bye in bbs brought 95 c . HIDES—Steady ot 18 % cfer dry flnts . R...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 April 1859

EVERGREENS . OK D E B S MAY BE LEFT WITH S . Francis for Evergreen Trees by the quantity , from the well known Nursery of Samuel Edwards , Bureau connty , at the following rates : Balaam Firs , American Arbor Tites , White Pine , White Spruce , six to ten inches high , $ 5 per hundred and $ 35 per thousand . The same varieties , from the woods , collected by Mr . Edwands agents , who take them up lo the best possible manner , selecting trees carefully from open exposures , packing at once in damp moss , at $ 15 per thousand and $ 90 per ten thousand . American Larch , two years In the Nursery at $ 10 per 1000 . European Mountain Ash , C feet high , $ 18 per 100 ; 8 to 10 feet , $ 26 per 100 . Kelt Pine Strawberry plants at $ 3 SO per 1000 : and Hybrid Scotch Bhubarb at $ 3 per 100 . Orders for the articles may be left with ntchl . S . FBAKCIB . _ SEEDS , aARDEKT , FIELD AND SLOWER SEEDS in great variety , for sale by . 8 . FRANCIS . gy-geeds will be sent by express or mal , as order...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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