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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

The Indian Advocatk. 348 J I ii LOCALS H j :: :: i Our Indian school has an average of forty pupils. Rev. Fr. G. Guillaume paid a flying visit to his once old home. If the weather permits and the good God is willing, our new Monas tery will be habitable by Christmas. Rev. Fr. William, of Purcell, I. T., visited us on the 8th, and re turned on the following day. After six months spent in Norman, O. T., Rev. Fr. Meinrad, O. S. ( B., has resumed his philosophic chair on our premises. Quite a large amount of cotton is being marketed from this point, and the "see-sawing" prices keep the sellers speculating. The sale of lots in the new town of Asher, in this county, came off , on advertised time and attracted a large crowd of interested buyers. The prices were rather "stiff," for a new location, and evinced the evident faith which the purchasers had in the venture. We hope their expectations will be realized. The Sisters of Mercy have up to date more pupils this year than ever, and the nu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

349 The Indian Advocate. 1 ST. BENEDICT'S INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, I I Roll of Honor for September. Joseph Bruno. Sherman Petterfer. Samuel Brant. Claude Castleberry. Roy McEvers. Stephen Negahnquet. James Shopwatuck. Floyd H. Harrison. William Scott. Patrick Thos. Tierney Walter J. Turnbull. JUNIORS. SENIORS. Jerome Melot. Michael McDole. Louis Brant. Frankie Wano. John Goodin. James Peltier. Claud E. Dowel. Spire M. Berry. Benedict J. Hillerman. Francis J. Schaefef. Walter Freeney. I . w ., "-2!Lail!!J!J!M!!!LgL!!JJL, " Jfc -rTraaifciia'ia i " '

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Vol. XIII. The Indian Advocate DECEMBER, 1901. CHRISTMAS DAY. Let this day see all wrongs forgiven, Let peace sit crowned in every heart, Let bitter words be left unsaid, Let each one take his brother's part; Let sad lips learn to smile A day is such a little while! Of all days, this is the shortest! Let rich and poor together meet, While words of kindness fill the air. Let love spread roses in the way, Though winter reigneth everywhere. Let us know naught of craft or guile A day is such a little while! Of all days, this is the shortest! 'r Let us help each with loving care Our brother on the way to heaven; Let's lay aside all selfishness, Let pride from every heart be driven. Let Christmas Day bring many a smile- Arday is such a little while! Of all days, this is the shortest! No. 12

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

" T 1 1 k Indian Advocate. 351 HELP SAVE THE INDIAN CHILDREN A "Society for the Preservation of the Faith Among Indian Children," approved and recommended by' His Emi nence James Cardinal Gibbons, the Most Rev. M. A. Corri gan, D. D., and the Most Rev. P. J. Ryan, D. D., has been established for the support of the Catholic Indian Mission Schools. The conditions of membership in the Society are two: First, an annual subscription of twenty-five cents; second, to pray for the success of the Society. This Society will endeavor to secure a membership of four hundred thousand as soon as possible, which should not 'be a difficult task, since there are in the United States more than ten million Catholics. To insure success promoters are 'needed in every parish. We urge our readers to assist in this most necessary and meritorious work, and to apply for in formation and blank certificates of membership to Rev. W11. H. Ketch am, 941 F Street Northwest, Washington, D, C. We publish the followin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

352 Tur. Indian Advocaik. fjT I SITTING BULL. & Sitting Bull belonged to the Uncpapa division of the Teton Sioux. Although a medicine man rather than a chief, he had gained a reputation in his early years by organizing and leading war parties, and became prominent by his partici pation in the battle of Little Bighorn, in Montana, on June 25, 1876, by which Custer's command was wiped out of exist ence. Being pursued by General Terry, Sitting Bull and his band made their escape northward into Canada, where they remained until 1881, when he surrendered, through the mediation of the Canadian authori ties, on a promise of pardon. To obtain sub sistence while in Cana da, his people had been obliged to sell almost all they possessed, includ ing their firearms, so that they returned to their old homes in an impoverished condition. After confinement as a prisoner of war until 1883, Sitting Bull took up his residence on Grand river, where lie re mained until he met his death. Here he cont...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Tun Indian Advocate. 353 the opposition to civilization and the white man, and his camp became the rallying point for the dissatisfied conserva tive element that clung to the old order of things, and felt that innovation meant destruction to their race. For seven years he had steadily opposed the treaty by which the great Sioux reservation was at last broken up in 1889. After the treaty had been signed by the requisite number to make it a law, he was asked by a white man what the Indians thought about it. With a burst of passionate indignation he replied: "'Indians! There are no Indians left now but me." How ever misguided he may have been in thus continuing a losing fight against the inevitable, it is 'possible that from the Indian point of view he may have been their patriot as he was their high priest. He has been mercilessly denounced as a bad man and a liar; but there can be no doubt that he was honest in his' hatred of the whites, and his breaking of the peace pipe, saying tha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

r 354 The Indian Advocatk. 1 THE ANGELS AND FAITH. : Prominent Protestant thinkers of the present day not in frequently lament the lack of spirituality among their peoples. The wide-spread materialism of the age, they declare, has .re sulted in a sweeping sway of ideas and beliefs which are dis tinctively spiritual. Essentially, such is an unquestionable result of modern forms of belief. From the first, the tend ency of Protestantism has been to ignore the spiritualism in man's nature to eliminate, so far as practicable, whatever was of the supernatural order, and build, nearly as possible, a structure of religion resting upon a human basis. If, then, no flame of whitest spiritual radiance glows within the com pleted edifice if the light that 'gleams is only that of com monplace humanity, and the ineffable splendor of the Spirit ual is absent whose the fault? Two worlds lie before each human being the world of Sense and the world of Spirit. The one we daily apprehend with our physic...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

The Indian Advocate. 355 ll istic has been to eliminate from the souls of men this supreme jjv quality of spirituality. Being an effect of a divine grace (faith) s' cannot be attained through merely intellectual processes. ' n closing to the souls the portals of admission to that white J, ' kingdom of the unseen, modern materialistic Christianity has done. great evil. It has paved, and is paving, the way for agnosticism, if not positive unbelief. To every Catholic child his guardian angel is a real personality a distinct, lova- ble intelligence, watchful as a father, tender and compassion ate as a mother. He is kept pure through feeling that con stantly he stands in the presence of an angel. "He hath , given his angels charge over thee to keep thee in all thy K Ways," the Psalmist and the Church assure him. The Prot estant child, on the contrary, entertains no such conscious ness of an angelic presence. He is not taught that his Father in heaven has accorded to him an angel who watc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

"WPT" wwtfm 356 Thi: Indian Advocate. SKSPWtT-jHv, pressible sweetness of childhood The 'holy angel of God, beholding the purity of tli'e Child-Soul, in his affectionate care and sympathy draws near and ' strews every path with love, fills every nook with crystallest sunshine. "Heaven lies about us in our infancy," exclaims Wordsworth, ther' 'poet philosopher," and we may account it the natural cry of a soul conscious of the once-blissful companionship of a Supernat ural Intelligence. There was a time, the poet muses, pathet ically ' ' v 1 'There was a time when mea'dow, grove, and stream, ' The earth, and every common sight ' Mt. , ' To me did seem Appareled in celestial light, n , t The glory and the freshness of a dream." Among full-grown'people in whom the child-soul remains intact, the same child-like condition of happiness is always perceptible. Heaven, we may believe, lies close about them because they have kept the faith, the purity of childhood, and are learned in the langu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

The Indian Advocate. - 357 Tobias to a happy union with Sara. The Psalmist, again, assures us "That the angel of the Lord shall encamp round about them that fear him, and he shall deliver them." Judith, likewise, asserts that the angel of the Lord was with her dur ing her going out to the tent of Holofernes and her coming in. Numberless other instances showing the watchful care of those appointed guardians readily occur. Even among the higher order of pagan nations we find a kindred belief obtain ing.i Logically, we are impelled to believe, they reasoned that a Supreme Beitig whether the God of Plato and Socrates, or the Zeus of the poets could hardly have placed man here without appointing over him a holy Intelligence to guide his feet and protect him against the world of the flesh. Platots Damon, and that of Socrates, bear remarkable likeness to the Angel Guardian of the Jews. Pythagoras believed the earth and the heaven to be filled with a higher order of spirits. Plutarch held t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

ilidMT ' '' 1 ffl.in. . '"'I 14 358 The Indian Advocate. ft i professedly Christian faith. We have already witnessed Wordsworth's opening consciousness struggling to express itself through a hesitant yet majestic utterance. Frequently the same consciousness is apparent in the more spiritual of Tennyson's poems, and in Browning it returns to us again and again. Longfellow is full of it,' and in "The Monitions of the Unseen" Jean Ingelow presents it in a new phase. One of the tenderest passages of Marlowe's "Tragical History of Doctor 'Faustus" is where the attendant angels of good and evil re spectively struggle to withdraw him from, or lead him into, sin. When Faustus is about to sign his soul away, the angels stand beside him and advise according to their kind. 'Again, during a moment of compunction, the good angel returns and counsels: "Faustus, repent; yet God will pity thee." ' Once more, when the victim is yielding to despair of God's mercy, the angels stand on either side and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

The Indian Advocate. 359 i r ...... .... wtww nmiim.mwt t THE RELIGIOUS ORDERS MUST GO. j J . ANARCHISTS MAY STAY, j 4'4 -- . These two items form an antithesis in France. In the United States, Religious Orders are tolerated, and most de cent men want the anarchists to go. Behold another antithe sis! Whence the difference? The difference in the line of operations lies in this, that the secret orders, to which the anarchists belong, are in control of the government, and can boast of their ascendancy over their religiously inclined fellow citizens, whilst in this country the revolutionary element have only well begun their work and must await their graduating day a little while yet. When that day comes, they will follow up the self-same methods that are being employed in France, and once more the monks and sisters will have to pack their knapsacks and look out for other shores. The object of the secret societies is the same everywhere. Their motto is, "Down with the Altar and the Thro...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

360 The Indian Advocate, ' ' ' What the condition of these affairs will be we may judge, i we only look at France and Italy: Bank scandals, king- , killing, church robberies, high taxes, depopulation these are some of the beautiful things that -will meet the eye of the ob server in the new regime. As to secret orders, they are already boasting that the time is not far distant when all Christian churches vill disap pear from the face of the earth, and that the church of the future will be the public school, where men will be brought up according to "broad" ideas; when all differences with re- N gard to the fundamental principles of life will, .disappear, and man, recognizing his supreme and unlimited authority in the world, will, pay respect and allegiance to none above himself. Kings, emperors, presidents and priests no longer existing, no laws obstructing his path, and no police restraints being brought to bear upon him, man is left to do as he pleases; to follow, unshaqkled and un...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

J V V. i ' Tut. Indian AijVocatk. 361 PECULIAR CONDITIONS. A recent report made by the Interior Department shows that there is over thirty-three and a quarter million dollars in the United States Treasury to the credit of the Indian tribes, drawing interest at 4 and 5 per cent, which results in an annual income of more than $i,6oo,oop. One must not infer from this, however, that the Indian is deriving great benefit from the fund. So far as he has any control of it, or can call it his own, it might as well not be there. This fact was best evidenced when the Catholic Indian asked the government for some of it with which to educate his children in the Catholic school. You will recollect the occasion. It was after the government withdrew its aid to the contract schools and violated a sacred compact by so doing. Fearing to trust the faith of his child to the irreligious govern ment school, he asked for a part of this fund to educate the child according to his own religious belief? It was...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

1 fc . k'r 362 The Indian 'Auvoca'if, . ?i t4 . ....... .. J WINTRY NIGHT IN BETHLEHEM TOWN, j : By Anita G. Henry. I -4 - The little birds have flown away, The days are cold and drear; Pulses throb and night winds sigh, Wintry days will soon be here. The summer flowers they too, are gone, For winter days are nigh. The scented rose and blossoms sweet Have told us all good-bye. The winter night has fallen 'round; I gaze out on the sky And hear angelic notes, "Glory be to God on high." And through the vision of the night , I see a stable bare, Where lowly shepherds find delight In lonely vigil there. O great, O wondrous theme divine1 "Our God becomes a child!" And greatest mystery yet of all, Of virgin born so meek and mild. Sing angels fair their song of praise On this first Christmas night: "Hail! hail! the new-born Kingl He is our way, our guide, our light." INs -aWfa "dfawrtridrtTiiirw. in n Vtii Wi s If- .r n r V

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

1 ? ir w Ju. Tub Indian Advocate. 363 I THE INDIAN ADVOCATE j J H Published by the Benedictine Fathers of ! t! SACKED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Un ler the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Appnncd by Rt. Rev. Thco. Mcerschacrt, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TKTIMS OF SOnNORIPTIONi Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. a Bntered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart.'Oklahoma. - I'mVILRRRSl V ) ' ' Eery Subscriber and Benefactor will participate n all the merits, pra ers and good ' , works of the Religions of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High. Mass is sung eery First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred f i -- Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors.. s 3. A Conventual Mass is offered e cry First Saturday of the month for our departed , . Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. I'ery year, in the month ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

364 The Indian Advocate. Envy has slain thousands: but neglect its tens of thou sands. , A flatterer is said to be the beast that biteth smiling. But it is hard to know them from friends, they are so obse quious and full of protestations; for as a wolf resembles a dog, so doth a flatterer a friend. Three monks are the Ordinaries of three Dioceses in Germany. The Bishop of Augsburg is a Franciscan friar, the Bishop of Limburg a Trappist, and the newly-elected Bishop of Metz is a Benedictine. - - A law has been passed in Norway providing that .any woman who desires to marry must present to the proper au thorities a certificate stating that she is skilled in cooking, sewing, knitting and embroidering. Some such law on our state statutes would prevent the family disputes that lead to the divorce court and alimony. It is an interesting coincidence that it should be a body of Benedictines that has first sought refuge in England from the associations law, and also that Appuldurcombe House ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

Tiik Indian Advocatk 365 Quinault reservation, in Washington, comprising 300,000 acres, probably will be thrown open to settlement next spring. The contract for surveying the reservation is about to be awarded. In Fuanck, some weeks ago, the officers of several regi ments, by way of celebrating the anniversaries of great vic tories by French arms in the past, ordered requiem masses for the soldiers killed in action. This was too much for the Ma sonic soul of the French Secretary of War, who forbade the celebration of the masses. France is a free country, you ,know free for all except Catholics; they must be handi capped and their best men and women must be exiled. - - Ski.kishnkss seems to be the complex of all vices. The love of self, when predominant, excludes all goodness and prevents all truth. It is the great enemy of individuals, so cieties and communities. It is the cause of all irritation, the source of all evil. People who are always thinking of them selves have no time to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

366 Tun Indian Ahvocatk. i the people have accomplished here more than any other com munity has ever accomplished in a quarter of a century. The history of the achievements of this people, their progressive ness, energy, industry and American citizenship have never been equalled." Ir we die to-day, the sun will shine as bright and the birds sing as sweet to-morrow; business will not be suspended a moment, and the great mass will bestow but a thought upon our memories. "Is he dead?" will be the solemn inquiry of a few days as they pass to their work. No one will miss us except our immediate connections, and in a short time they, too, will forget us and laugh as merrily as when we sat beside them. Thus shall we all, now in life, pass away. Our chil dren crowd closely behind, and they will soon be gone. In a few years not a being can say, "I remember him." We live in another age, and did business with those who slumber in the tomb. This is life. ' Ha hits are forming like masonry. live...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 December 1901

T ffWP'iWfpBljp Tin: Indian Advocate. 367 affairs: In the Choctaw Nation there are 5 academies and 160 day or neighborhood schools. The total attendance is 2,555 and the cost $96,008.56 per annum. The Chickasaw Nation has an average attendance of 315 at its five principal schools, which are maintained at a cost of $14,025 a year. The Creek Nation has nine boarding schools, six for Indian children and three for children of their freedmen. There are also 64 neighborhood schools, of which 41 are for Indians and 23 for negro children. The average attendance is 1,407 and the total annual cost $68,258.88. In the Cherokee Nation there are 30 full-blood, 80 mixed, 14 primary and 124 neighborhood schools. There is an average attendance of 2,81:. The total annual cost of the schools is $82,735. The Seminole Nation is the smallest of the Five Civilized Tribes. Its scholastic population is about 900, divided as follows: Indians, 400: negroes, 400: whites, 100. No reports of work among these sch...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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