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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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IRELAND’S HOPE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

IRELAND’S HOPE. BY DOCTOR STEPHENSON. For the Pilo t. When the cannon from afar, Thundering forth the din of war, Crashes in the Savon’s ear And fills the Saxon’s heart with fear 5 Then, oh! then, our sacred cause l Shall triumph o’er the “ alien’s” laws : Irishmen ! tell then be steady— Oh ! but, for your souls be ready. Till yo 1 hear from foreign shore, Rush along the wrathful roar Of freemen gathering in their might, To dare “ Britannia” to the tight,— Till our injured isle demands Atonement from avenging hands; Irishmen! till then be steady— Oh ! but, for your souls be ready. Till in every cannon’s boom You hear Old England’s corning doom ; Till she quails upon the day, Tire “ Eagle” marks her for his prey ; Till “ to arms” the nations cry, “Ireland’s rights’’— the loud feply ; Irishmen ! till then be steady— Oh ! but, for your souls be ready. Kneeland st., Boston.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EXTRACTS, FROM LETTERS WRITTEN FROM ROME DURING THE YEARS 184—. No. IX. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

EXTRACTS, FROM LETTERS WRITTEN FROM ROME DURING THE YEARS 184—. No. IX. These Englishmen are a sad drawback on one’s charity. I desire to respect them as men, and to love them as neighbors, but I am often strongly tempted to despise them. They visit Rome in schools, like small fishes—and are to be foUnd every where—in the museums—in the churches —among the ruins—in galleries of paintings—in the streets—in fine, wherever there is any thing to be seen. They move with an air as if every thing were got up expressly for therp—and they gaze upon every thing with a patronising air as tho’ they were the proprietors. They make a great parade with their money—dress like faps-ystrut like peacocks—lavish dollar after dollar on worthless guides and abject waiters—and fly in a passion and abuse the Romans because a poor honest beggar craves one cent iu charity. Their conduct at the Sixtine Chapel in Holy Week is every year a notorious scandal. Their rudeness, impudence, and vulgarity is so barefa...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A WORD ON THE LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

A WORD ON THE LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES. J. B. Written for the Boston Pilot. Never has a greater versatility of talent been displayed on this continent than during the last twenty years, and never during any similar period has society benefitted less in the acquisition of serious and standard literature. America at this moment (I mean the United States) possesses all the facilities necessary and sufficient to raise to a vety eminent rank the literary character of her people; and yet most lamentably has she neglected to avail herself of them, —of the means which the onward progress of time and its events has placed in her hands. To say that education, as such, or as the basis of literature, is less prized, or le?s extensively promoted, than it has been in times preceding, would be evidently untrue —the daily increasing number of our literary institutions at once attest the contrary. But it is, unhappily, no less certain that a desire for philosophic acquirements —an effort to a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE LATE TYRONE POWER. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

THE LATE TYRONE POWER. JUVERNUS. IVrilten for the Pilot. A paragraph recently appeared in one of die boston daily papers, (Post), containing reflections derogatory, as well to the general attainments, as to the dramatic talents of the late peerless Irish comedian, the lamented Tyrone Power. In this invidious, if not malignant efFusion—prompted perhaps by mercenary purposes or designed, at least, to give an ephemeral celebrity to one, who is comparatively incapable of sustaining a valid claim to anything approaching the highest rank in his peculiar line of acting—are set forth . statements, at once, as impudent and reckless, as they are false and peculiar as to the facts relative to the birthplace and artistic eminence of that gifted son of the Ocean’s Emerald Gem. The individual who thus assails the memory and fame of the great departed, would seem to have been actuated by no enviable motives in “tracking the steps ofglory to the grave,” and rudely tearing from the brow of pre-emine...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
“THE EVERLASTING CHURCH.” [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

“THE EVERLASTING CHURCH.” For the Ronton Pitot. “There is not, and there never was, on this earth, a work of humanity so well deserving of examination as the Roman Catholic Church. The history of that church joins together the two great ages of civilization. No other institution is left standing which carries the mind back to the time, when the smoke of sacrafice rose from the Pantheon, and when cam- j eleopards and tigers bounded in the Flavian amphitheatre. The proudest royal houses are but of yesterday when campared with the line of Supreme Pontiffs, that line we trace back in an unbroken series, from the Pope who crowned Napoleon in the nineteenth century, to the Pope who crowned Pepin in the eighth: anti far beyond the time of Pepin the august dynasty extends, till it is lost in the twilight of fable. The republic of Venice came next in antiquity. But the republic of Venice was modern when compared with the Papacy ; and, the republic of Venice is gone, and the Papacy remains,—n...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FROM THE SEAT OF WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

FROM THE SEAT OF WAR. From the Seat of War. By our New Orleans exchanges of the I9th and 20th we learn the arrival at that port of the U. S. steamer Telegraph from the Brazos Santiago, Port Lavaca and Galveston, with advices lrom the Brazos to the 14th and Galveston to the 16th iust. We have news from Camargo to the 7th instant. Geu. Taylor had crossed the San Juan the day before, and had taken up his line of march for the Seralvo on the morning of the 7th. The commands of General Worth and Col. P. F. Smith were stationad at the latter place, awaiting the arrival of General Taylor. The whole force on the march to Monterey is estimated at about 12,000 men. General Patterson was left in command ol all the volunteers from Camargo to the mouth of the Rio Grande. It was reported that General Taylor would not proceed farther than Seralvo until he received further orders from the government. An express was received at Camargo on the sth inst. from Gen. Worth, staling that he had chained in...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
BOSTON REPEAL ASSOCIATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

BOSTON REPEAL ASSOCIATION. The Association held its regular monthly meeting in the usual place, on Monday evening. The chair was taken a little after eight, by the Vice President, Mr. John C. Tucker, who presided during the transaction of business. The President, Mr. James, arrived soon after the reports had been received, when Mr. Tucker left the chair. ' The President addressed the meeting. He apologized for his absence on the previous night, and expressed his pleasure at being again able to meet the Association. The cares of life, and the fatigues of business sometimes rendered it necessary for him to retire a short time to recruit his energies. He had been resting, thus, upon those shores which look over the Atlantic; and every day he had cast his thoughts, with his eyes, towards that land for whose independence this Association lived and labored. So that, though he was absent from this Hall, he trusted it would be believed that Ireland was always present to his mind. The intell...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 2 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 2 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

John Murphy, Baltimore, is getting out a number of new books. See his advertisement. O* The Boston Liberator calls the Evangelical Alliance, recently assembled in London, a “ Brotherhood of Thieves !! !” . Cold Weather. True & Baxter, No. 46 Congress St., are nowprepaied to furnish stoves of every description. We need hardly urge upon the friends of Capt. Baxter, to give him a call, as we know his numerous firiends will not forget him. There will be a Requiem Mass offered for the late Bishop Fenwick in St. Mary's Church on Friday, Oct. 6lh at 8 o’clock. The members of St. Mary’s Clothing Society will attend in a body. A bill was recently introduced into the Legislature of Mississippi, allowing all females over 14 years of age, the privilege of voting upon the questions of granting licenses for the sale of intoxicating drinks. The article on “Young Ireland,” the author of which is alone responsible for its sentiments—is written by a gentleman recently from Ireland. “Juver...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
YOUNG IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

YOUNG IRELAND. New York, September 23 d, 1346. To the E iitor of the Boston Pitot: Sir, As the unhappy dissensions amongst the leading members of the Repeal Association have, whether for good «r ill, become matters of discussion with Irishmen in America, will you allow a “Belfast Repeal Warden,” only a resident here for the last month, to say a few words to his exiled countrymen on the subject, through the columns of vour aide and (1 believe) truly impartial journal? 1 am. I will not conceal it from you, what threefourths of mv countrymen at home are, heart and soul, opposed to all coquetting with a foreign Government, with Whigs and Whiggery, and consequently devotedly attached to the stern, unbending, and uncompromising principles of “Young Ireland.” However, although this is the case, it is not my purpose to depreciate the character of O’Connell, or to impeach the purity of his motives in hispresent strange course; for that, I can assure you, is neither the principle, nor the obj...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

Business Department. THE BOSTON PILOT IS PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE PROPRIETOR, PATRICK DONAHOE, Ou every Saturday morions, at No 1 Spring Lane, near Washington Street, Boston, Mass. TERMS s2.so—il' paid within three months from the time of subscribing-otherwise $3 will be charged. $1.50 for six months. Four months $l. O’ Letters not post-paid (except from Agents) are not released from the Post-office. O’ No paper discontinued until all arrears are paid up. We publish the following for the hem fit of postmasters, many of whom do not send proper receipts:— Post Office, , , . To the Post Master at Boston:— Sir—l have this day received S — l fer subscription to the “ Boston Pilot,” with which I have charged myself in my accounts with the Government, and given the publisher an order on you for the amount, which you will please pay ou presentation. , P. M. The following’ is a convenient form for the receipt requisite to be sent, simultaneously, to us: Received if: for subscriptions to ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Oregon Missions. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

Oregon Missions. mo. vi. Au pied de la Croix tU la Paix, Sep. 15, 1845. Here “Poplars and Ilircli trees ever quivering plaxed, And nodding Oedars form’d a fragrant uliwle ; On whose hisli branches, weaving with the storm, The birds of broadest winas their mansion form : The Tan, the Magpie, the loquacious crow, And soar aloft aim skim the deeps below. Here limpid fountains from the cletfs distil, And every fountain forms a noisy rill, In mazy windings wand’ring down the hill.” J\lonseigneur —We bade adieu to the Morigeau family, on the 9th, and to their companions of the chase, the Sioushwaps. We quitted the upper valley of the Columbia by a small footpath which soon conducted us into a narrow njountain defile, where the light of day vanished from view, amidst the huge, bold barriers of colossal rocks. The grand, the sublime, the beautiful, here form the most singular and fantastic combinations. Though grey is the prevailing color, we find an immense rock of porphyry, of white veine...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Ireland. SPEECH OF SMITH O’BRIEN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

Ireland. SPEECH OF SMITH O’BRIEN. A public meeting was held at Cahermoyle, at which Smith O’Brien was warmly received. Addresses were presented to him from Rathkeale and Newcastle. The following is the honorable gentleman’s speech on the occasion: — Mr. O’Brien then came forward to address the meeting. He was received by a deafening shout of applause, which was re-echoed with the greatest enthusiasm for upwards of ten minutes. On silence being in some measure obtained, the hon. gentleman proceeded to speak as follows:—My kind neighbors and friends, I do not know whether you may consider this meeting to-day as partaking in any respect of the character of a political demonstration; but I assure you it was my wish that it should not have been so considered if this meeting had not been attended by those gentlemen who so faithfully record what is said on those occasions like the present—l mean the reporters of the press. As they have done us the honor to come here today, we will say they...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

IV ET KNITTERS AVAN -Lk the subscriber, Female Net Ki accustomed to Net Knitting in Irelai WM. STOWK, No. 2 Merc 26—6 t (between City Wharf & Fancy roods, of Engiis man Manufacture. A. S. .1 and Dealer, No. 2 Milk street, ! ami offers for sale low, for cash, a ec Hair, Tooth mid Nail Tooth Brushes, Razors Shell, Ivory ami Horn Fen an Combs. Steel 1 Horn ami Shell side do, Perfim Snuff and Tobacco Boxes, Shavii Thimbles, Cloth Painted cigar cases, Canes, Wood lead pencils, Silk an Pocket Books, llemir Card Cases, Silver Port Folios, Plain i Shaving and cloth brushes, Needli Hand ami mouth mirrors, Razor Playing cards, Pe rein Cologne Water, Perfuli Bear’s Oil, Germs Macassar Oil, Ox mn Violet Soap, Beal’s Low’s Windsor do, Merchants and pedlars buying for i their advantage to call before purt all goods in the above liue will be i vorable terms. Groceries and pro A BAIRD, Nos. 93 and 95 Es form their friends and former patron* their old stand, recently destroyed by fbr for...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

JSotices of this kind inserted foi INFORMATION W Of BERNARD COWLEY, ofKiii Lemahqn, who emigrated tc this cc ago. When lasi heard ol he was in tl Any information respecting him w ceived by his nephew, Bernard Cowl of Connecticut. Of MATTHEW HUGHES, and formerly of Trim, co. Meath. When Nov. lo 43) tliey were in St. Louis, Mi of either of them will be thankfully n A. Wilson, addressed to him in care paper. Of EDWARD DOYLE, parish of .who emigrated to this country ah 'landed in St. John, N.B. His friends] him at home about 3 years ago) he ' Samuel Fareweather, in St. John. 6 there, and is supposed to be in Mo Any information respecting him wi ceived by his brother, James Doyle, i Power, No. 81 Essex street, Bos office. Of JOHN DOLAN, stone mason the parish ofKillinagh, co. Cavan, w on the 13th of August, 1836. When years ago lie was in St. Louis, Mo. speeting him will be thankfully rec Mark Dolan, addressed to him in ca law, Michael Dolan, Milton, Ms. Of JOHN DARGAN, a native of W hen...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LOYAL NATIONAL REPEAL ASSOCIATION. MEETING OF THE 31ST OF AUGUST. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

LOYAL NATIONAL REPEAL ASSOCIATION. MEETING OF THE 31ST OF AUGUST. The Liberator entered the hall shortly before one o’clock in his alderrnanic robes, and was most enthusiastically cheered. Mr. John O’Connell, Mr. D. O’Connell, junr., Mr. Steele, and other of the prominent members of the association, were also warmly received. At one o’clock, on the motion of the Liberator, seconded by the Head Pacificator, the chair was taken amidst loud cheers by J. K. O’Dowd, Esq., barrister-at-law. The Chairman proceeded to address the meeting, he said—Allow me first to congratulate you, upon your unbroken harmony and your continued union and cohesion, notwithstanding the information conveyed by the reverend correspondent of a vveely newspaper that you were “ broken into fragments” (great cheering). I am informed that the number of seceders from your ranks do not yet amount to a dozeu, whilst the faithful and steady approvers of your policy exceed one million of our fellow countrymen. This is con...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE REPEAL MEETING. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

THE REPEAL MEETING. THE PILOT. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3,184 G. We beg to direct the attention of our friends in Ireland to the proceedings of the Boston Repeal Association as reported in our columns to day. We would have them to observe that the resolutions of that meeting are not a hasty expression of feeling with reference to a passing event : they set forth the grounds on which this association was established, and the principles on which it has been conducted. In that sense, they may be said to have passed, nemmi contradiciente ; there was a small, though respectable, minority who wished to introduce an expression of regret with respect to the late secession ; but no one disputed the undeniable fact that the body had always maintained the ground of constitutional and legal agitation. There has been some mistrust and misunderstanding in Ireland with respect to American Repealers. No doubt, we have been suspected as a party composed of revolutionary enthusiasts directed by crafty polit...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE NEW YORK TRUTH TELLER. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 3 October 1846

THE NEW YORK TRUTH TELLER. We have already noticed, in general terms, a sort of nibbling hostility which prevails among some of our professing to advocate the same principles with ourselves. We observed, also, that it seemed to result trom a habit of writing in disingenuous, and offensive terms, rather than from any bad feeling towards us particularly. We thought we had dismissed the subject, with those remarks ; but there is a sort of annoyance which, however contemptible, compels us to notice it. Our language is being misconstrued and misrepresented in the grossest manner.— We have never seen anything to surpass the cool impudence with which expressions and sentiments are falsely attributed to us by the Irish Volunteer, the Catholic Herald, and the Truth Teller. The first of these prints, after having published a libel, such as we allude to, comes out, in a few weeks after, with a notice to his readers that we had acknowledged our fault. That was cool indeed. But the Volunteer had...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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