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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1995

April 1995 Atrazine study could mean harmful ag loss (Continued from Page 1) tions and at the proper rate, it's just as safe as any chemical out there." And that was supposedly why the EPA tightened labeling restrictions in 1992. Previous label changes for atrazine helped contribute to a 10-year trend that shows a substantial drop in total pounds of atrazine applied, Leed said. In 1984, growers applied 110.4 million pounds of atrazine. By 1993, that amount had fallen to 74.2 million pounds. The newest restrictions prohibit farmers from mixing, loading or applying the chemical within 50 feet of any wells or sinkholes, intermittent streams, rivers, natural or impounded lakes or reservoirs as defined by U.S. geological survey maps. See This Gorgeous Flowering Tree Change From White To Pink To Purple In Your Yard I Sensational "Color Changing" Bill I 1 Va _ | ORDERHERE rU LL 1-T ©a r , house of wesley, nursery division /*■■ ADA fcJTEE 1 dept. 7463-94 1704 Monissey Drive VUAKANIBt I Bloo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1995

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261 CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec /Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each is...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1995

April 1995 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) MBFB Company, Box 646, Christiansburq, Va. 24073. ATTEND GOVERNMENT AUCTIONS—for ful information, send $2 and S.A.S.E. to: CQC, P. O. Box 742, Bristow, Va. 22013. PROVEN—hot/mild barbecue sauce recipe. $2, plus S.A.S.E. Boxholder, P. O. Box 389, Windsor, Va. 23487. PROVEN REClPES—sauce for ribs, cole slaw, dressing, hush puppies. $2, plus SAS.E. Boxholder, P. O. Box 3, Windsor, Va 23487. NOW! —frozen tomato slices. Garden fresh flavor, year round. Complete, easy, instructions. $1, Hamiltons, Box 652-2, New Ulm, Minn. 56073. COLD WATER DILLPICKLES!—Can in minutes. No hot brine, deticious, crisp. Recipe, $1, Harribns, Box 652-2, New Urn, Mna 56073. BELL'S BEST—gourmet Virginia peanuts. Hand roasted, make perfect gifts, will ship anywhere. Call/write for brochure. Bell's Best, P. O. Box 15211, Chesapeake, Va. 23328,1 -800-700-7540. MAKE DELICIOUS—German cornbread. $1 to: Parris, 32252 Hillman Hwy„ Glade Spring, Va. 24340. 12-INCH T...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1995

BUSS And You Can Choose the Program that Fits Your Health Care Needs! • Hospitalization and Surgery • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Diagnostic and X-Ray and Lab Tests • Preventative Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products of Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield JHL M r ■ 1 I V TT and its subsidiary health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Service Corporation is an agent of ijgl | J \ J j Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield. Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield is the trade name of Blue Cross and ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

f .. • . harm Bureau Vol. 54, No. 4 Ag regulatory reforms promising, VFBF leaders learn By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor WASHINGTON—At a time when federal farm programs are coming under increased budgetary attack, the outlook is promising for many long-sought regulatory reforms affecting agriculture. That's what 100 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation members learned March 15 during a visit to their elected representatives and senators. The chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., expects as much as $50 billion to be sliced from farm spending in the next five years. But Sen. John Warner, R-Va., said farmers have already seen their fair share of budget cuts over the past decade. Warner joined the Senate Agriculture Committee this year. "We believe that for a number of reasons, agriculture should not be unfairly singled out to bear a disproportionate share of budget reductions," Warner said in a joint letter to Domenici. National farm program spending has dro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

2 Viewing Virginia Extension director to retire BLACKSBURG—WiIIiam A. Allen, director ofVirginia Cooperative Extension and associate dean ofVrginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, has announced he will retire at the end of June. Allen has been in the college's and extension's administration since 1983 after serving 15 years as extension entomologist at Virginia Tech. Before coming to the university, he was an extension agent in his native Florida. Farm group gives to scholarship fund RICHMOND—The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation contributed $5,000 to the Virginia Tech Agricultural Technology Scholarship Fund for 1995. The Farm Bureau's Agricultural Technology Committee decided student enrollment in the two-year ag tech program and scholarship fundingwere pressing needs. VFBF was the driving force behind the establishment of the program, the organization feels it has an obligation to do everything possible to ensure a successful ag tech program at Virginia Tech. Envir...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

May 1995 Burley growers unfairly charged for selling their commodity "The Great Southwest," as our members so affectionately refer to their region ofVirginia, is a land of dedicated, God-fear-ing citizens who shower you with a kind of Southern hospitality rarely found today These hearty, unpretentious folk whoTl look you straight in the eye and offer a firm handshake, make "The Great Southwest" just that. Life isn't easy in this mountainous region of the Old Dominion. Our hardworking farmers there must depend on raising beef or dairy cows or growing burley tobacco for a living. Burley is the lifeblood of a farming region where a struggling economy can make things awfully difficult at times. The leaf not only supports the small family operations, it helps drive the economies of cities and towns like Bristol, Abingdon, Gate City and Jonesville. Burley is an air-cured tobacco grown in the southern Appalachians ofVirginia, Kentucky, West Virginia and Tennessee, and the flatter lands of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

4 Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up atonofcash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU 9 MEMBERS. As if our Magnum engine series, overall the most powerful line of truck engines on the planet, wasn't incentive enough for Farm Bureau members to buy a Dodge, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1995 5.9 L Magnum gas and Cummins diesel Ram regular cab pickups, plus select 1995 mid-size Dakota pickups. The offer includes all full-size 1995 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge offer. * All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you '11 discover, it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. WPABMW* ' ||p^ V f • —; : JBBi ***&■'** America's Truck Stop The New Dodge 1 A DIVISION OF THE CHRYSLER CORPORATION "This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31/95, and may not...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

May 1995 Southwest Ma. tobacco, dairy producers taking economic hits By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist ROANOKE—Tobacco and dairy farmers will likely feel a squeeze as the industry attempts to accommodate rising costs, demands for different types of products and urbanization And that could mean an economic crisis for Virginia, aooording to a local expert on agricultural economics. The most powerful hit to Virginia's economy may come from a decline in tobacco production—one of the state's largest employers, according to Dr. Wayne Purcell, professor of agricultural and applied economics at Virginia Tech. Tobacco is the state's fourth largest commodity, with farm receipts totaling $181 million in 1993, Purcell said. And, he noted, the most significant facet of the tobacco industry is its production phase—thus its powerful effect on Virginia's economy. "As we face different adjustments in the tobacco industry, the pain is not only going to be felt at the farm level,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

6 Groups'visit to Washington prompts action (Continued from Page 1) Farm Bureau members also lobbied for a cut in the capital gains tax and a repeal of the federal estate tax Both taxes restrict the ability of farmers to invest in new land or pass their land to the next generation, they said. The capital gains tax almost forced him not to sell a smaller farm and purchase a larger operation to become more profitable, said Thomas Motley, a Pittsylvania County dairy producer. "Looking back on that now—what incentive is there for me to try to improve if I have to pay it all in taxes when I try to go up another level?" Motley asked. But cutting the capital gains tax is 6S We cant say we're for a balanced budget amendment and then vote against everything that would accomplish that —Charles Robb, D-Va. Shearing shrubs severe treatment; stunts growth If you've started sharpening your hedge trimmers in anticipation of shearing your shrubs and hedges, reading this may save you some work. Alth...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

May 1995 Ostrich capture Virginians' attention; provide market potential (Continued from Page 1) When the Drains bought their first ostrich pairs in 1992 they paid $3,000 for one 3-month-old pair of chicks. In 1994, similar pairs were selling for $12,000. Breeders are still selling for between $19,999 and $30,000 a pair, according to numbers published in the March 1995 edition of The Ratite Journal. Following start-up costs, maintenance of the birds depends on the size of the ranch, Drain said Food costs are minimal. Ostrich graze on grass and eat pellet food manufactured by the same companies that manufacture dog and cat food. It takes 2 pounds of food a day to sustain an adult ostrich Thafs about $35 a month for adults and $16 a month for chicks. Costs of running a ranch are much more expensive at the Alpha-Omega Ostrich Farm in Orange County, reportedly the largest ostrich operation in Virginia. Contractor Kenneth Bendall and his family turned his father-in-law's 215-acre corn op...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

8 VFBF women make agriculture education a top priority Virginia Farm Bureau Federation women have many ongoing programs, but their top priority for 1995 is Agriculture in the Classroom. For those not familiar with AITC, it's part of a nationwide effort to help students develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, agriculture—Virginia's largest industry. With only about 2 percent of the American population residing on farms today, most people are far removed from daily farm life. There was a time when just about everyone had a relative who lived on a farm and they could visit and learn about farming. But since it's not that way anymore, the founders of the ATTC program decided it would be best to focus agricultural education on Virginia's youth. Professors at Virginia Tech developed materials for the program that are aimed at fourth-grade students. The subject matter is broad enough to be used in any The safest most efficient 1 Wl wood heat system on the market, the TAYLOR r; =...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

May 1995 New disease-resistant corn hybrid approved GREENSBORO, N.C.—Ciba Seeds, a division of Ciba-Geigy Corp., was granted a limited registration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for commercial production of corn hybrids genetically engineered for protection Are your dental I A 1 I r.l 7| I bills more painful IWJIIMIH than having your tooth drilled? We can't do much about the pain in the dentist chair.. .but our new dental insurance plan will take away the "pain" from his bills. The Virginia Farm Bureau through Acordia Benefits of the South, Inc., offers a unique dental plan. Coverage includes prevention, diagnostic, and restorative dental procedures including fillings, extractions, oral surgery and periodontal and endodontic treatment. There's no need to worry about dental bills any longer. The cost of our plan is reasonable and offers both individual and family coverage. For more information, call 804-784-1234 or write to the Virginia Farm Bureau today. Please send ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

10 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) t Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

May 1995 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 10) WANTED—"Life" and "SE Post" magazines before 1960. Paving $.50 to $2 each. Call 703-387-3926. TOMATO OR POTATO—wine recipe. $2. S AS.E. to: Coins, P. O. Box 365, Tasley, Va. 23441. SINGER SEWING MACHINE—large cabinet, gold touch, many attachments, $150. Counter top toastmaster oven, $35. 804-787-1570. FOUR —delicious church social recipes, $2. S.A.S.E.: Mary, Rt. 7, Box 71, Bassett, Va. 24055. FOR SALE—old wall crank telephone. 804-823-5472. WANTED—oId signs, service station oil, cans, bottles, road maps, pedal cars and old bicycles. 804-265-5561. FOR SALE—art, recycled crafts by special artists to help themselves. 703-752-7153. GREAT!—hard cider. Send $2 for guide. Rush River Cellars, Box 191, Washington, Va. 22747. PROVEN REClPES—sauce for ribs, cole slaw, dressing, hush puppies. $2 plus S.A.S.E.: Boxholder, P.O. Box 3, Windsor, Va. 23487. PROVEN—hot/rrid barbecue sauce recipe, $2 plus SAS.E.: Boxholder, P. O. box 389, Windsor, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1995

i -M ■ £j| A A 9 | ■ ■ ■ ■ • L-M> 111 9R K m£; ||p H ■■ ■ I And You Can Choose the Program that Fits Your Health Care Needs! • Hospitalization and Surgery • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Diagnostic and X-Ray and Lab Tests • Preventative Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products of Thgon Blue Cross Blue Shield JBL M r I 1 ■ » "1" and its subsidiary health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Service Corporation is an agent of JL I ■ I \ T\ 31 Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

Riirp^y Vol. 54, No. 5 VFBF members endured worst fire season in eight years By GREG HICKS VFBF Director of Communications TAZEWELL—Forest fires raged out of control in much of central and western Virginia during a dry, windy April, destroying 8,000 acres of woodlands and threatening many nearby farming operations. With more than 1,200 fires in April alone, state officials have called 1995 the state's worst fire season in eight years. Fire officials said blazes in Virginia were started by arsonists, cigarettes, open fires and —most importantly to farmers —from equipment use and faulty exhaust systems. But they were easily fueled by debris left behind by last year's ice storms, insect damage, and below average precipitation. "We usually look at late winter and early spring as a time for replenishment of the groundwater, rather than a time of depletion," explained Chip Knappenberger, a climatologist for the Virginia Office of Climatology in Charlottesville Farm Bureau farmers with tra...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

2 Viewing Virginia Poplar trees for run-off control WARRENlON—Anerivinonmental group in Fauquier County is experimenting with tree growth as a way to control agricultural rurxrff into the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. "Keep Fauquier Clean" is heading an effort to plant aspen poplar trees on Leonard's Farm, a beef cattle operation on state Route 211 near Warrenton. "In experiments by farmers in lowa and Oregon, these trees' root system has been shown to absorb the [run-off] nutrients that cause harm to streams, and the trees serve the practical purpose of keeping cattle out of the streams," said Patricia M. Katzen, Keep Fauquier Clean's executive director. The project receives assistance from Virginia Cooperative Extension and the Virginia Department of Forestry. The first tree planting occurred in midApril with a second wave of planting slated for Tuesday, May 2. Nutrients from agricultural run-off are one of several sources of algae that reduce the oxygen supply in the waters...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

June 1995 New legislation puts common sense back in food safety laws Farm Bureau and farmers across America are on the of winning a longfought battle to modernize one of the most outdated and unrealistic food safety laws of the century. If approved by Congress, the Food Quality Protection Act will end the threat of losing 37 of the most important field crop protectants used nationwide by farmers. H.R. 1627, was introduced May 2 by Virginia's own Rep. Thomas Bliley, Rr7th, chairman of the House Commerce Committee, and House Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan. The bill will overhaul the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, as well as a very important provision of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. H.R. 1627 would replace the "zero tol- Exports key to future agriculture sales Exports account for about 25 percent of the value of our farm products, or more than $45 billion this year. Until somebody figures out a way to get American consumers to want to spend m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1995

4 Candidates for public office learn campaign practices By GREG HICKS VFBF Director of Communications CULPEPER—Those who consider running for public office must first ask themselves some very tough questions, or they shouldn't run at all, according to a national elections expert. They must also perform a self evaluation, be extremely organized and ready for negative campaign tactics. Brad Eckart, deputy director of legislative services with the American Farm Bureau Federation, explained this and much more during a two-day campaign seminar May 17-18. It was all part of AFBF's Campaign Training Seminar hosted by the Virginia Hay crop damaged by poor spring weather RICHMOND—YieIds are expected to be down this year for hay, one of Virginia's most important field crops, because of poor spring weather. 'Usually around this time of year, 75 percent of the hay crop is reported in fair to good condition," said James Lawson, a statistician with the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. Ju...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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