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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Danger in Dyeing Brown Boots Black. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Danger in Dyeing Brown Boots Black. . If you'dyc your brown, boots black you'.limy have to spend more money than-if *you bought a dozen pairs of new boots. Jn many of the^c dyes are,aniline colours, which arc easily • absorbed: by the open pores of the feet, and the result may be a very -severe type of blood-poison ..intent ense to hd re ported is that of a perfectly heal thy young man who wore a pair of brown shoes that had just been dyed black and were not yet. dry. In two hours he been mo livid, .the lips -..bluish, ..the'"enrs purple, the'nos trils. retracted, : the skin chilly and pulse -112Q: and weak. The doctors were puzzled until they' saw the newly blacked shoes in a corner of the room - where the .'-young man had flungi them in his agony. After treatment the young umii recovered, but he wanted no more of the shoes. Iiranother case a young, nuin puC ou a pair, of shoes dyed 111 the sumo way, and putting ou no socks moiiut ed his bicycle. In fifteen minutes he w'as • • seue...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DO JUDGES JOKE TOO MUCH? [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

DO JUDGES JOKE TOO MUCH ? Although complaints are heard that some of our judges joke too much, they are not quite so free and easy in court as certain occupants of the American bench. When a man charged with stealing some spoons from an innkeeper, Ster rit, by name, pleaded guilty, a judge, | the Hon. Kiah Tlodgers, discharged j him. "I have reason to know," con-1 fessed his Honour, "that the liquor j sold by Rterrit is enough to make a man do anything dirty. If he will j sell bucIi abominable stuff he ought. not to have the protection of this j Court." j Vtodgers, on another occasion, when , a pickpocket he had fined twenty-five j dollars could produce only fifteen dollars, remarked, "Turn him loose . in the crowd, and let him raise the j other ten." I

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The M.P. as Hero. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

SOlfETHiN'G TO LOOK FORWARD TO. " Udicn, before raj procccd any further a-ith the crinoline craze, just picture on« of yourselves riding a bike ia a crinoline." The M.P. as Hero. .Many graphic descriptions of grout llros liavu been published in news papers, in magazine*, ntid in novols, but we have never read n more vMd short account ot a firo Winn thnt furnished by Mr. Oliver I.uckor I ampson, M.P., who recently <iis- j Unguished himself hi rescuo work at tho firo which broke out ut Hyde 1'urk Chambers, Knightsbridge. Here is the heroic M.IVb account as it nppcarcd In ' The tluios.' "I -heard cries. On looking up I saw that there was a parapet against the skyline, with a rail round it, and on it the figure of a woman in white. Although she wns seven storeys up, her voice car ried to me as clearly as if she woro standing close by me. " 'Oh I hurry,' sho was crying, ' do hurry !* "Tho flames seemed to be getting nearer and nearer ovory moment. It was a most pitiful thing t...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"DEAR UNCLE SAM." [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

"UK Ah r.S'CLK RAM." A little Scuttle schoolgirl, Lottie ; Lifter, has been the means of mov- I iim the Government of the United States to a rare act of oflicial sen timent. i Lottie wan the possessor of a Bel- j gian rabbit which needed a nest for its '*eight little bunnies," and sought one in Lottie's father's Panama hat, with disastrous results to that ar ticle of headgear. Whereupon Lottie, 1 perhaps with some dim idea of Gov- . vernment stewardship of the national ' welfare, wrote to "Dear Uncle Sam" f for a new hat, enclosing (J3c. for the purpose. j Her conlidenee was nut disappoint-' ed. Immediately upon receipt of her , letter an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury gave the matter his per sonal attention, bought a brand new Panama for Lottie, and despatched ■ it by parcel poet, with an official j letter containing "Unelc Sam'* best! greetings." lii olden days Custer marked the dawn of a new year.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Safety in Submarines. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Safety in Submarines. 4 In the 0 type of submarine vessels, ono of which roconfcly foundered— fortunately without loss of life—as tho result of a collision, the crew have a much better chaneo of es cape than in the earlier types oi this vessel. • They are fitted with 1G cylinder horizontal petrol engines o/ the Vickcrs pattern, which de velop 750 horse-power. These en- ! glnes aro used only when running on the surlacc ; when tho vessel Is submerged propulsion is by electric motors operated by storage bat teries. .The petrol is stored in such a way as to mako it impossible for tho vapour to mix with the air in the boat and so cause an explosion, i as happened to A5 oft Queenstown. The only danger possiblo (soys an j authority) is leakage of petrol : through joints when tho vessel is j submerged, in which case tho spark ing of tho motor might cauyo an explosion, but tho likelihood of the ' danger lias not been overlooked, for, in tho latest (J typo tho electric motors aro of a special...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHERE TYPISTS STUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

, WHERE TYPISTS STUTTER | The doctors from time to time hnve to ileal/ with a variety o[ com plaints which they term trade di j senses, such as painters' colic, lend j poisoning, and bo on, which arise jfiom the BUflcrerB1 trade. The latest j complaint is the typists' stutter. Typists' stutter consists ot liabi lity to misspell certain words when typing. A most common word to be misspelt is "the," Bpelt "hot" and "necessity" otten spelt "nccinBely." One doctor explains the complaint by saying that the typist's fincccrs are not llrmly controlled by the brain. He or she has tho word in the brain, and the stimuliiB is sent along the nerve to the finger muscleB, but ow ing to the loose control ot the bruin thoy become mixed. Another medical man thought, it was caused by the stimulus l>cing tie layed on one or other of the nerve routes to tho fingers, the stimulus for the last letter being quicker than thnt for the first.. Another explanation of the habit, was thnt the words so misspe...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DRIVING SIGNALS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

DRIVING SIGNAl.S. For the regulation or motor trallir, n correspondent suggests a simple system of signalling by horn blow ing. When a motor is approaching a cross road and it is the intention of the driver to go straight forward, ho should signal this intention by one blast of the horn. If he be turning to the right lie should givo two blasts ; if to the left (the most dangerous position) he should give three blasts. Kadi driver then would be aware of the intention of the other and know ex actly what to do. Horns should be used exclusively by motors and motor cycles ; bi cycles should follow the same rules, but should use hells. By this simple method of signalling motorists would he relieved of much anxiety, and their pleasure and comfort be great ly increased, and the public would i have a considerable safeguard.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORLD-WIDE NOTES. NEWS FROM EVERYWHERE. ULSTER UMBRELLA COMEDY. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

WORLD-WIDE NOTES. ♦ NEWS FROM KVBRYWHKRB. ULSTER UMBRELLA COMEDY. Uaseloss auspicious o( "gun-run-j ning" to evade the official prohibi-1 tion against importing arms'1 into ] Irclnnil, led to a little comedy in Cookstown, Co. Tyrone, Ulster. One day a postmnn emerged from tlie post ofllce with ft long, narrow brown paper pared slung from his shoulder. A wondering crowd follow eil. Members of the Royal Irish Con stabulary armed in haste and follow ed closely behind, and the postman began to tremble. There was silenco when tho door was opened by a little girl. "Oh, inummic, it's come," «hc joy fully cried. Tonrlng away tile paper she reveal ed a new umbrella, with the mes sage, "From your loving uncle Joe, Forest Gate, London." Then the crowd melted away.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Seat Round a Tree. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

A Seat Round a Tree, j ♦: j Thero is ccrtalnly no moro d«air* able position for a s«at In tho : open nir than under tho spreading foliage of a large tree, and tho ! purpose <V this article and tho ac companying drawings is to show a simple method of fitting up n suitable bench with tho minimum of ( labour, The sizes must depend on* tircly on tho tree it is intended to encirclo; but tho prlnclplo In-! volvcd will remain oxactly tho sumo, ) ■V- " I. . A SEAT HOUND A THEE. I First of all tlio surfaco Immodla- j ■ toly round tlio Imsa of the trunk' | should bo mcido up approximately I level, awl a number of uprights I bedded firmly in the ground by . means of long tarred ends. Tlioy | need to stand about 14in. or lf» in. high, and-may be of any reason- j able sire from 2in. by 2in. up wards, or unwrought sections of stout branches might bo employod. ! They are sot out, according to small squares marked with crosscs in Fig. 1 2, and carefully arranged in order ' to sec that pr...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HONEYMOON UNDER THE SEA. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

11UXKYM00N UNDKIt THE SEA. Remembering the recent and zeal ous attempts of reporters to "track" the newlv-marrled daughter of Presi dent Wilson, Colonel Flemming, an American millionaire, fears the as siduous attentions of the journalists so much that he decided, immediate ly after his recent marriage, to take his bride in a private submarine and spend a part of his honeymoon at the bottom of the sea. His young wife was quite willing to follow her husband, bub there was one obstacle in the way. The bride cannot dispense with a lady's maid, und this maid is not easily found. At last, on an ofler of £,6 a week, a maid resolved to take her chance, but. insisted upon being insured for a big sum. She also stipulated a trial i trip in the colonel's submarine, but, once under water, she became hys terical, and fainted, and on being brought to the surface she ran away. The resolution of the bride and bridegroom, however, is still un shaken.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sleep Prevents, Not Cures Fatigue. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Sleep Prevents, Not Cures Fatigue. .Most of us suppose that wo,sleep becdti.se we are exhausted. Hut Dr. Claparede, the Swiss physiologist, him just advanced a new theory, which is.to the effect that we sleep in order to avoid being exhausted. The theory is that sleep, instoad of being - the-.result' of fatigue, jsjui impulsive self-disinfection which the body conducts in order to get rid of the waste products before they have time - to produco exhaustion. Just as combustion of fuel for the production of heat and energy is always attended by ashes and slug, so the sTow combustion which pro duces heat and energy in the body is likewise attended by waste. "Since the senses never voluntarily come to rest or shut themselves ofl from the outer world, a point would eventually be reached when the or ganism would perish as a victim of general nerve exhaustion. In or der to hinder this Nature arranges betimes, i.e., before exhaustion can .vcriously injure the organism, to set in motion that ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WONDERS OF THE CARDIAGRAPH [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

WONDHItS OK THIS CARDIAC.!!APII Prince Arthur of Connaught, who j was accompanied hv Princess Arthur, in opening the new building in West moreland-street, W.. of the National | Hospital for Diseases of the Heart, : alluded to the installation of the j electric cardiagrr.ph, a delicate ap paratus for registering the opera tions of the heart in connection with which most important developments i have been accomplished. An intricate system of wires con- I necting every bed in the institution i renders it no longer necessary lo re- ' move patients from their bed in or- ] der to ascertain the precisc condi- ; tion of the afiected organ. Formerly, it was impossible to place under ob servation by this remarkable appli ance patients who were exposed to .the slightest element of danger by the process of removal from their beds to another department ! Now the conditions of the patient I they lie in bed. The wires can be connected with the physician's quar ters, say some five stories awav, and...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Which End of a Post Should be Up? [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Which End of a Post Should be Up ? " 1 T It is a very common belief among farmers that a post jyill last longer if set In th« ground tho roverso of the way it grew in tho tree, in other words, with tho butt-end up. Accordingly, ono scos many posts, ©specially end and gate posts, with tho small end down. The supposi tion is that sap in a tree is al ways ascending, or at least that it is easier for tho sup to go up than down. Consequently, it is argued, turning a post upsldo down tends1 to provent the rise of water, helps to keep tho wood dry, and, there fore, renders it less liablo to decay. | As a matter of fact, sap or water can /low in either direction with equal facility and tho popular uo lion to th® contrary is Incorrect. Careful experiments on tho relntivo durability of post timbers have beeu made by tlio Ohio Agricultural Ex periment Station (says tho "Scien tific American") and tho above ques-! tlon was considered. One fcnci In j particular contained 150 black lo- , cust pos...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STEEL RAILWAY CARRIAGES. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

STEEL" RAILWAY CARRIAGES. Steel is not only displacing timber in railway carriage construction, but also for freight vehicles as well. In order to obtain rigidity and strength it is usual to ridge or corrugate the plates in various ways, but a new method of construction is finding fa vour In some quarters. Particulars are available of a freight car in which the entire end is formed of a single sheet of steel pressed with concentric annular cor rugations, no posts, braces, or rivets being required. The plate is attached to the car body by means of bolts or rivets engaging the corner angles, and it is claimed that the design re leases additional space inside, adding about a foot to the lengtli available. J

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Tommy's Hobby. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Tommy's Hobby. The following happened in a Man chester school recently. The tea cher hail been speaking in unique ami valuable collections of objects of art and interest, and spoke of the fabulous wealth that hud been expended by some of the collectors on their peculiar hobby. Thinking of some idea, of the char acters oi* the member# of his cla«« iu this direction, he asked them , what they thought the.v would like J to collect if they had plenty of j money. I Up went the hand of a boy who i was not noted for particular bril- ] linnce— in fact, answers from him ' were very scarce on any subject ; so this opportunity was seized by the , teacher. ; "Well, Tommy, und whut would j ' yon collect ?" j | "Renls, sir," ; was the prompt re [ply. . i | The lesson was changed, and that; j teacher is recovering . from the shoe';. .Mfj»'v Kbimmnrion, wife of M. ( Kinmmaiion. the astronomer, is an 1 ardent worker in the Peacfc Movo mont in France. # j The loiiur.st artificial watercourse , in the...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHAT KINGS SMOKE. THE GERMAN EMPEROR'S FREAK CIGARS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

WHAT KINGS SMOKE. —T THK german - 13MPKR0IVS -freak cigars. King Cioorgo has tno distinction of lioliic? the only .European Sovor- I oiKu who smokua n pipe. All. iho others arc ardent devotees of ^tho cigar or tho cigarette. , I The 7'^inperor Francis Joseph of, Austria-Hungary, at the venorablo ngc of eighty-three, Is reputed to be j the heaviest Iloyal smoker, his fa\ourito being a cigar to cheap and so common that it is smoked Uy almost overy peasant in tho country. It is a long black cigar,! tapering at both ends and traversed^ lv a straw. The ftmpcror's brand, however, is an exceptionally powerful one, possessing a "bite " j which would make it extremely oO-! iorl jonable to most men. Pespito I (his fact the aged tiuler is able to smoke more than twenty a day' without, feeling any ill effects. I Turkish cigaret tes, exquisitely (la- f voured and scented, are the passion I of tho (J7«r of Jlussia, who senr- < cely over smokes anything else. His! cigarettes are made' f...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVIII. A DISCOVERY. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

(-•JIAI'TKi: XV] II. A I'lSCnVKRV. I When 1-Vlix was well out of sight, I and Hebe hud disappeared within the t hous<\ that sw-p upon the grav«l | walk, which had ceased rather mv-t j teriously, was .explained. "Monsieur Oudrey rose suddenly from I he , shrubbery growing close against the arbour, nn<! u Jong, low whistle loft his lips. j "So the wind bos that way, 'does il he muttered, ns hc lazily fleck ed the dust his knees'had gathered.1 "If things arc ns J gravely suspect ( wivli my- silent client in the little | house down then; by the river, th«* | love-making of those yountf fcols is apt to.. come to rather a dramatic close. .1 wonder what he'll say when 1 tell him Felix Love is to marry the sister of the man ho hates so bitterly ? I wonder what I he'll say V" I He lit a cigar and gtrollod lei surely down the path to th* groat' gate* opening on th© wide, white road. " I dure not venturo, farther. Should Raritan reed his valet, he must be at hand, nnd thi...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Animal Prize Fights. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

Animal Prize Fights. » — At Gwailor, a nntivo stat*o~ of Central India, combats of animals are tho chlcf entcrtainmont got up to umuso tho visitors, says a tra veller. The rams showed the beat fight of all. l.ct lly from opposite-«nds of tho circle, they met in the centro of their tremendous course, tho repeat ed dull thud of their horns echoing for days after in my ears. A white rani was produced, which was held back with dilljculty, springing and showing fight to all the rams that ciiinc near him. ITe proved too strong and heavy for nil the others, and they fled in terror before hiin. Then he would take a mean advantage of their retreat and go after them, butting at their backs and sides and turning them con temptuously over. Tho traveller also saw* a snako pitted against a mongoose, but, curiously enough, little fury as the mongoose is, he refused to touch the very handsome spotted snake] which was first put in with him, | but retreated at - every hiss. The second and smaller one...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EFFECT OF ACCENT. A BATCH OF GOOD STORIES. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

EFFECT OF ACCENT. A HATCH OF GOOD STORIES. from a list c< examples of the rfipcl of the misuse of ncccnt, pub lish«?*l in the ."New York Tribune," wo take the following.:-— At a trial between two London music publishers before the Court King's Bench in 1813, the nuiti.IT in dispnto being* a violation of the copyright in the song of "The Oh! English. CJentlnrnan," Thomas Cooke, a composer of some note in his tiny, wns subpoonned an expert witness. <>n rross-c.xumination, Sir .7 nines Srnrlet questioned him ns follows.: —"Now, sir \ . You Buy that the twn melodies aro the same/: but.dif ferent.. What do • you mean by thnt V" Toni promptly, answered* "I said thnt the notes in the two copies wro alike, but with different nc rent, . the one being in common timt'.and consequently tho position ««C the accented notes was different."' "Xow, pray, sir, don't bent about the bush, but explain to the i"ry, who are supposed to know no thing about the bush, tho moaning of ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STALKED BY FIFTEEN LIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 30 April 1914

STALKED BY FIFTEEN LIONS. A message from Capetown Rives de tails of the terrible fate which be fell a Greek trader named Sataras, while on a journey from Barotse. Accompanied only by a few natives' Sataras was travelling in charge of some cattle, and one night when they were in camp, about forty or fifty inileB from Sesheke, fifteen lions and lionesses appeared out of the scrub and carried off one of the ani mals. The natives urged Sataras to remain in camp, but he was amirms to overtake another herd of cattle which was travelling in charge of a | man named Laurie Kerr. J All day the lions stalked the cat ; tie, and darkness overtaking the men, j Sataras fell a victim to them. The j terrified natives ran on to Kerr's j camp, but when ho returned nothing i but a few bones remained to tell of | the tragedy. j An express train travelling from j Nice to Macon, Prance, was beaten j by twelve minutes by an eagle which I raced it over a distance of eightero I miles.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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