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Title: Queensland Country Life Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 185,984 items from Queensland Country Life, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AYLESBURY AND ROUEN DUCKS. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

AYLESBURY AND ROUEN DUCKS. Aylesbury ducks are noted for being small of bone. In comparison with the very large size of the birds the bones of this breed are very small. The birds thus give little offal, and this is one of the reasons why they have acquired such an excellent reputation for the production of early ducklings. It is as table birds, and more especially as ducklings, that the Ayles burys excel. As layers and general purpose birds Rouens and Pekins are preferred by the generality of breeders. Though not so well adapted for the production of early ducklings as the Aylesbury-because it is somewhat slow of growth during the early stages of its exis tence-the Rouen duck is capable of being grown to a great size, and mature birds of the breed are frequently met with well in excess of the Aylesbury in the matter of weight. On the average the weight of Rouens may be put down as i lb. a-piece heavier than that of the Aylesbury when both breeds have reached maturity. Iir 1812, whe...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
TO DISSOLVE LARGE BONES FOR MANURE WITHOUT EXPENSE. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

TO DISSOLVE LARGE BONES FOR MANURE WITHOUT EXPENSE. Take any old flour barrel and put into the bottom a layer of hard wood' ashes; put a layer of bones on the top of the ashes, filling the space between the bones with them; then add bones and ashes alternately, finishing off with a thick layer of ashes. When your barrel is filled, pour on water (urine is better), just sufficient to keep them wet, but do not on any account suffer it to leach one drop, for that would be like leaching your dungheap. In the course of time they will heat, and even tually soften down so that you can crumble them with your finger. When sufficiently softened, dump them out of the barrel on a heap of dry loam, and pulverize and crumble them up till they are completely amalgamated into one homogeneous mass with the loam so that it can be easily handled and distributed whenever required. You may rely on it, this manure will leave its mark and show good results wherever it is used.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
BUSH HOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

BUSH HOUSE. mi i J* . . « The work of propagation should be in full swing in this department. Propagate begonias and gloxinias by leaf, and other soft-wooded plants should be propagated by cuttings, layers and by division. Avoid dashing too much water on leaves and cuttings. Water gently with a can through a rose. Where propagation is done on a large scale, and watering done with hose, precaution should be taken against too strong a force being used. Soak the ground gently, and it will repay the extra time taken in gentle watering. Tie up all plants requiring support, caladiums, achemines, etc. All ferns, staghorns, etc., should receive spe cial attention with water, etc., at this season. See that the shading is good on the roof, also the west side, to break the afternoon sun. If creepers have grown over, cut them near the roots, leaving the tops to wither on the house. Keep all things well watered while the dry weather continues.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Field, Orchard and Garden. FOR JANUARY. FLOWER GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

Field. Orchard anil Garden. FOR JANUARY. (By Mr. Jas. Mitchell, Bowen Park.) FLOWER GARDEN. "Rain wanted" is the general cry at this period, and little can be done in the way of planting or sowing until it comes. The prin cipal work should be cleaning up, leveJli g lawns, and repairing edges, or verges on walks. Above all see that the drainage system is as near perfect as possible. Drainage is one of the most essential and economic operations to be carried out in the garden, for a garden with out a good djrainage system is always in danger during the wet season. Water will be come stagnant and make all the surroundings sour and unhealthy to plant life during dry weather. The land that is well drained and well tilled will require little or no artificial watering. A most important question is how to successfully counteract the ill effects on plants by continuous dry weather. When plants are fairly well established in the soil artificial watering should be avoided as much as pos sible,...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
FRUIT GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

FRUIT GARDEN. As soon as the bark will lift, bud plums, peaches, etc. Determine the proper time to bud by cutting a small twig and try if the bark will lift. When the bark runs freely bud as near the ground as possible. Tie the bud in firm, but not too tight; cover up the bud with light soil, and slacken the ties at intervals to prevent the buds being strangled. Do not cut back the stock until the bud has made a few inches of growth. Plant pineapples and bananas if not already done. If possible do not let the fruit trees suffer for want of water, especially the spring-planted trees, as they have not made sufficient root to support them selves. The best way to water is to dig out a little trench round each tree, and fill in as much water as you can afford, say from two, six or eight canfuls. When the water has got into the ground and saturated all round the trees, fill in the soil again Waterings of this kind will keep trees right for two or three weeks in the ^driest weather. Gather...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
VEGETABLE GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

VEGETABLE GARDEN. The chief work in this department during the month is the preparing of the land to receive the autumn and winter crops. Put in plenty of manure and dig deep, leaving the soil fairly rough on top, as it is best to let the weather break it up. There will be plenty of time before the crops are ready to put in, and by that time the soil will require a top forking and levelling, to prepare it for plant ing. The same thing applies for tree plant ing. Sow seeds for early crops of cauliflower and celery; a few French beans may be tried in a sheltered corner.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
SOFT FOOD FOR FOWLS. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

SOFT FOOD FOR FOWLS. To get the full feeding value out of the varied meals which, damped1 with water, are given to fowls, it is necessary that the mixing Typical LightlBr&hma Hen. be efficiently performed; soft food prepared in a hasty and slovenly manner loses no small portion of its efficiency, and unless the mixing is thorough, a certain quantity of meal is uterly wasted. It is quite impossible to mix the meal in the food-pail used for its distribu tion unless the latter is filled no more than a quarter full; a roomy wooden tub-in fact, an ordinary washing tub-should be used for mixing and devoted to no other purpose. It should have a periodical scrubbing and scald ing with boiling water to ensure its being kept thoroughly clean. The less a spoon or stick is utilised to mix with the better-one's hands do the work best; but when boiling water is used some implement must also be em ployed. There are amateur poultry-keepers who " shy w at mixing meals with their hands when p...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Fowls and their Management. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 January 1902

Fowls and their Management Many who have failed to make a success in other pursuits in life go at poultiy-keeping with the idea that it is profitable and easy, with little or no labour. They learn after a time what it means to hatch and rear one thousand chicks, One or two years' experience dispels their first idea, and they are glad to quit. Ducks are not as good field for ager as chickens or turkeys; their short legs and flat, web feet re tard their movements. On a pond or other water they make up for their awkwardness cn land, and go through much exercise that is good for them. The duck is exempt from many prevailing diseases to which other poultry are subject. They are usually excellent layers, the Pekin duck leading all in this respect.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
MESSRS. HEINDORFF BROS. ELIZABETH STREET, [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

MESSRS. HEINDORFF BROS.,' ELIZABETH STREET, Have just opened up a new shipment of the new English Gramophones. The vast im provements, both in the manufacture of these Machines and the reoords that have recently been made, are puch that there is positively no comparison between the sound repro ductions of even three months ago and the magnificent results produced to-day. Place the machine where i& cannot be rseen, and anyone within reasonable hearing will positively declare it is the human voice. Whilst on a visit to this firm we had the privilege of hearing a reoord produced, viz.f the well-known song, ' Hearts of Oak," as sung by Mr. Leo Stormont of London. The effect was wonderful, the volume of sound thoroughly complete, and one could not wish for a more thorough or realistic imitation of the human voice. To those living in the bosh or in country districts, these machines should be come very popular, and will help to pass many a long hoar away. On receipt of a request Me...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
FINNEY, ISLES AND CO. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

FINNEY, ISLES AND CO. One of the handiest catalogues among the large number of lists iseued by this firm has just come to hand, and fully describes the immense ranee of goods stocked by this firm. The name of Finney, Isles and Co. is a house bold one through out Q ueens land, and by their prompt methods of trading have obtained the fullest confidence of the country residents. How the immense number of country orders are dealt with and by what means the goods are despatched, and every particular of this firm's dealings with country clients are fully described in tbe neat catalogue to band. This also contains addi tional valuable information, and can be ob tained post free by the mere forwarding of a request. The business welcomed by tbe firm is best described in the following short descrip tion of a tour of the premises. To enter the immense building and walk through the various departments is to be astounded at the immensity of the stock, the magnitude of the business, and the advan...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Round the Shops. MESSRS. B. G. WILSON AND CO., IMPORTING IRONMONGERS, QUEEN ST. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

Round the Shops. MESSRS. B. G. WILSON AND CO., IMPORTING IBONMONGEES, QUEEN ST. Amongst the large assortment of new goods opened up by this well-known ironmongery house are a variety of stoves in all sizes and snakes. The splendid new line of Standard .Kerosene Stoves are specially adapted for cooking purposes, giving a nice blue flame, creating no smoke or unpleasant smtli. They possess rapid boiling power, and can be procured with or with out oven. The prices are :-Without oven, 45a and 55s ; with oven, £6. Primus stoves are 8 till a great convenience for the hot days, and .are selling freely. Price, 149 6d each; accessories to accompany same, such as ovens, -toasters, etc., can also be obtained at moderate -prices. In Enamelware, this firm have just added to their immense stock a new line, viz., the Granite enamel. This ware is of a pretty pattern, and is considered to be much «aore durable tban the ordinary enamelware. "The prices are quoted at-for Stew-pans, Is 9d, "2s, 2a 6d, ...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ALLAN AND STARK. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

ALLAN AND STARK. The summer sales still continue, and are being made more attractive every day. Fresh goads are put forward, some of the lines in Manchester goods being specially set out to in duce a speedy clearance, one of flannelette at 2s lid per doz. being well worth 4s lid; white twilled sheeting, 90in. wide, Is 0£d per yard, usual price Is 6J. An other shipment of the famous linen finish herviette?, which bad such a successful sale last time the firm imported them, are selling at 6s lid per dozen. To make way for fresh stock due to arrive in March, chiffons are being really sacrificed. These goods 8re so useful for shoulder capes and scarves for even ing wear, particularly in the crinkled makes. For a cape with silk or voile foundation nothing can be more charming, and the price places them within the reach of many who could not afford to purchase these dainty acces sories ready-made. In various shades they can be bad-crinkled 8£d per yard, plain 7£d, 10 jd. Is, Is 3d. These ...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Plant Foes. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

Plant Foes. (PAPER BY MB. A WILLIAMS, OF GBEEN HILL NUBSEBY.) Manifold are tbe foes of cultivated plants and complicated the life histories of the majority, for according to the best authorities the number of insects known to inhabit the world at tbe present time is 280,000; besides which, of coarse, there are a number of fungi which are injurious to field and garden crops. A large number of insects are of immense value to the cultivator, others are destructive to vegetation, whilst a large section are nentral. In addition to insect pests plants suffer to a serious extent from the excessive heat of the sun during hot, dry weather. This is especially the case with the melon, tomato, and other plants during the active growing season. It is therefore only reason able to believe that when; we completely understand the nature of plant diseases and the circumstances whioh disseminate them or tend to their curtailment we shall be more or less able to cope with them by rendering the surroun...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
CARE OF THE HANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

OABE OF THE HANDS. Not every woman has a nice hand, and to quote from the poets, " Trim, white and rounded, with taperiag fingers and pearly nails," says -Mme. Lia Band, the well-known authority on how to be beautiful. Much can be done by oare and attention, and as beauty knows no rank, it is within the grasp of all, poor or rich, to have nioe looking hands. When properly and* daily attended to it will take only a few moments to keep them in perfeet trim. Always use good soap when washing your hands, as common soap makes the hands rough. Use lemon in preference to pumioe stone to take away staiQB, and on retiring massage your hands with a good oream and then powder them thickly. This will in a short time entirely change the appearance of your hands and make them soft and white. If you have any warts on hands or arms touch them lightly with acid or caustic. The next morning wash in soft water and sorape off several layers with a dull knife. As soon as possible repeat the operation un...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

SALT . Best for Meat Curing and | Station use. SOLE AGENTS Henry Berry & Co., Edward Street, Brisbane. Stocked by ail Merchants and Storekeeper* V v

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

LAND GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK. BRANCHES 0P THE AB0VE BANK ARE NOW ©PEN AT Adavale Albion Alpha Aliora Amby Aramac Augathella Avondale Ayr Banana Barcaldine Beaudesert Beenleigh Blacks 11 Bogantungan Bollon Boonah Bowen Brisbane Bundaberg Burketown Caboolture Capslla Cairns Camooweal Cardwell Childers Chinchilla Charleviile Charters Towers Clermont Cleveland Clifton Cloncurry Coen Comet Cordalba Cooktown Croydon Crow's Nest Cumberland Cnnnamulla Dalby Degilbo Drayton Duaringa Dunwioh Eidsyold Emerald Emu Vale Engelsburg Esk Eulo Fernvale Fortitude Valley Gatton Gayndah Geham Georgetown Geraldton Gin' Gin Gladstone Goodna Goondiwindi Gowrie Junction Grandchester Gympie Halifax Harrisville Herberton Helidon Howard Hughenden Ingham . Ipswich Irvinebmk Isisford Jericho Jondaryan Jundah Kilkivan Killarney Kynuna Laidley Lake's Creek Landsborough Leyburn Longreach Lowood Mackay Mackinlay Mareeb* Marburg Maytown Maryborough Meringandan Mirani Miles Mitchell Morven Mt. Garnet Mt. Morgan Mt. P...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Summer Planting in Queensland. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

Summer Planting in Queensland. The excessively hot and dry season that we have just passed through has taught us another lesson re summer planting. We have once more been convinced beyond question that to depend upon midsummer rains in most parts of Queensland is only another way of courting disappointment and failure. It is impossible to plant some things success fully in the winter on account of their tender ness and liability to be injured by frost. With things of this kind it is better to plant in the early spring or wait until the summer rains set in,jwhich is generally after Christmas. Trees and plants that are put out in the early summer are often stunted and dwarfed and sometimes killed by the heat and drought which we experience annually in this climate. If early summer planting (I mean October or Novem ber) must be done, it is essential that the soil should be worked deep, fairly well manured, and that the plants or trees should be mulched, t.e., a layer of some loose mate...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Woman's World. Along the Way. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

Woman's World. Along the Way. A little love, a little cheerfulness, A little sense of home along the way, A little heartening in the battle's stress, A little singing at the close of day And oh 1 this life is not all cold and gray, But sweet with comfort and with sunshine bright, If that we keep, each helping as he may, These little things in sight. A little hope, a little faith serene, A little word of strength for those who fall, A little smiling, tho' tears come between, A little charity if need should call .And O I not paltry is our life, nor small, Bat big and fine and filled with sweet delight, If that we keep, each for the sake of all, These little things in sight. Ripley D. Saunders.

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

YT m'B. J| P.p fl The Finest Dark Tobacco 1 U U HUwUl ever sold in Queensland. SOT A DELIGHTFUL DARK SMOKE. rier Tobacco Pure, Bright, Aromatic. j A Cool, Light Smoke, Manufactured by W. D. & H. O. WILLS LTD. (Australia). ALFRED GR0SS & 60.. Brisbane. ^ THE KING'S Gold Medal Bitter Ale, Specially Brewed for Queensland Market. The Gastlemaine Brewery and Quinlan, Gray & Go. Ltd. Dewar & Son's .. Not a Headache In a Hogshead of it

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Apple of Paris. A TALK ON BEAUTY AND HOW TO PRESERVE IT. MME LIA RAND. [Newspaper Article] — Queensland Country Life — 1 February 1902

The Apple of Paris. A TALK ON BEAUTY AND HOW TO PRESERVE IT. MME LI A RAND. The face is said to be the mirror of the soul. It must also be conceded that the face influences the mind, the health and our neighbors. If our mirror tells us that we look ill it impresses us immediately, and we feel all that the reflected face shows, implies or hints at. The facial muscles are very sensitive, the -tissue very plastic; therefore it responds easily to treatment. The inclination to wrinkle -comes from the underlying tissues, becoming attenuated by reason of loss of natural fat, the epidermis shrivels and falls into folds. ^Undeniably, wrinkles can be removed, but they come under the head of chronic ailments .and demand persistent application of the remedy. This takes time. The remedies are iood and exercise. The pores of the skin are very absorbent; iience if the face shows signs of attenuation it .can be fed through the pores by massaging with a good, well recommended skin cream. To do the w...

Publication Title: Queensland Country Life
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
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