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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A New THRILL in BEAUTY SEARCH [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

A New THRILL in BEAUTY SEARCH Still more excitement for the hundreds of beautiful Australian girls who have entered for the Paramount-Australian Women's Weekly "Search for Beauty" Contest! The New South Wales winners will be announced next week and everyone is waiting eagerly, of course. But there is something else: an urgent cablegram has come from Hollywood asking Paramount to make a special search among the entrants for a suitable girl for the title role in "Alice in Wonderland." THIS forthcoming Paramount pro- duction of Lewis Carroll's famous classic is still without a girl for the title role. Perhaps she may be found among the Australian entrants in the Search for Beauty contest. What a wonderful prospect! No contest is involved in the choice of the "Alice in Wonderland" girl, but if a suitable type can be found, then Paramount will make a screen test of her and rush the film to Hollywood. The cable read: "Wanted a bright, childlike, blonde girl to play title role in Paramount...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

For the best "Clever Idea," 10/- will be paid. A minimum of 2/6 will be paid for other ideas published.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Bring the GARDEN INDOORS The Old Gardener Says [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

The Old Gardener Says Bring the GARDEN INDOORS Hundreds of people living in flats would love gardens. The Old Gardener comes indoors this week, and over a few cups of tea offers suggestions on indoor gardens. "WOULD I like a cup o'     tea? Too right I would, on a cold morning like this. Wait till I scrape the mud off me boots, Miss. . . . Ah . . . that's good. Nice, bright little living room you have here. Miss . . . why don't you bring some of your garden into it. You know, there's a lot of people as thinks you can't have a garden unless you got a garden. Well, I'm Irish, as you know; come out thirty- three years ago I did, and I don't hesi- tate to say that you don't need a garden at all to have a garden. "NO matter what sort of dwelling you live in, you can turn it into a garden with pots, window boxes, and so on. In me travels round the suburbs I even dis- covered a woman who had turned a fire- place into a rockery. Thanks, miss, I will have another cu...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LADY MAYORS CAUSED SENSATION [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

LADY MAYORS CAUSED SENSATION Elsie M. Lang, in "British Women in   the 20th Century," tells of the unique and historic luncheon given by Miss Margaret Beavan, Lady Mayor of Liverpool, to nine other Lady Mayors. Smiling and benevolent, in plumed hats and ample robes of office, they lined up for the photographer, presenting a wonderful blaze of color—scarlet and ermine, blue and gold. Thousands of curious eyes followed the regal-appear- ing party as, escorted by their hostess, they went a tour of the city and viewed the gold and silver plate in the cathe- dral. The Socialist Lady Mayor of Deptford, Mrs. Beatrice Drapper, caused a sensa- tion in that somewhat dingy locality as she departed for the gathering in her blue velvet robe.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CLEVER IDEAD HINTS FROM READERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

PCLEVER IDEA   HINTS FROM READERS       V^LL Y LIX IL^LZ-^s* HINTS_FROM READERS A SMALL magnifying glass held be- fore the eye of a needle or a sewing machine needle will save your eyes when threading.—10/ to Mrs. E. Ganter, 5 Maitland Rd., Islington, Newcastle. BURNT ALUMINIUM saucepans should be filled with cold water, suffi- cient to cover the burnt part, several pieces of rhubarb should then be boiled in the utensil for 20 minutes. All burnt discolorations will be dislodged.—Miss N. Wright, 14 Aberdare Rd., Cessnock. THE HOUSEWIFE who has to wear glasses will find, if she smears the lenses with glycerine that the lenses will not become clouded by steam during cooking and laundry operations. —Mrs. C. S. Brown, Pacific Highway, Raymond Terrace. AVOID BROKEN buttons. Take the buttons off the shirt front, and in their place make buttonholes. Then stitch the buttons on to a broad piece of tape, and slip them through the made button ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
A Menace on the Roads [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Illustrated by EILEEN FARQUHAR PULLING the car in to the kerb, and thus     bringing the sentence       to a full stop in the   middle. Jacqueline   pointed to the pave-     ment.       "Now," she said, "get   out! And go home by                     bus."   "I think," Ronald re-                 torted, "I would   rather." "Having you grumbling beside me while I drive is like having some- one breathing down my neck while I'm playing bridge. You wince when I change gear, and when I pass another car you practically hold on to the seat. I don't want you to teach me ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Brains in a Wife? Just Ask a Man! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Brains in a Wife?   Just Ask a Man! "Why can't those brilliant University girls marry?" asked Miss Kathleen Pitt, B.A. (Melb.), (Oxon.), in a recent issue of The Australian Women's Weekly, and gave a provocative answer-"Men aren't interested in brilliant girls." In this clever article a University man answers her criticism. By JOSEPH ELLIOTT, M.A. Ir appears from statistics that the majority of women graduates from our Universities do not marry. Miss Kathleen Pitt has argued rather convincingly that the single blessedness of these women is due to their erudition—that a University de- gree is a handicap to a woman seeking a hus- band. This is a grave indictment of the good sense of my sex, and I hasten to vindicate our reputation. It would be idle to deny that most women of scholarship do not marry, but I do not think that it is due to man's natural stupidity. "The average young man," writes Miss Pitt, "is alarmed when he learns that he is dancing with a University stude...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
POiNTS OF ViEW A Rival For the B.M.A. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

A Rival For the B.M.A. TWO thousand doctors in England have com- bined to form the National Health League in revolt against the B.M.A. Their ideals are to cure people on bio-chemical principles, and by educating them in methods of correct thinking and eating. It is the new health system of which Sir William Arbuthnot Lane, a famous London surgeon, is an advocate. Australian doctors must be watching develop- ments closely, for there is no country in the Empire where the B.M.A. is more powerful than here. It is necessary that there should be some body, like the B.M.A., to maintain a code of ethics for medical men. The general public has sometimes felt rather cynical about those ethics, but two disputing bodies would hardly add dignity to the profession. * * * Charm and the Vote A NOTE from our Paris correspondent last week mentioned that the life-motif of the Paris girl is to charm. French women even carry this principle into politics, thus differing from the traditional stiffness of ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Connie's Letter My Dear Pals,— [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Connie's Letter My Dear Pals,— HOW would you like a picture puzzle   each week in place of a crossword? Write to me as soon as you can and tell me which you prefer. Pals, the best letter for this week was written by Joan Ryan (13), 7 Bushby Parade, Waverley, for which she receives a prize of 2/6. Joan,   while staying with some of her rela- tiens in the country, witnessed a bush fire that threatened to burn down the homestead. Luckily, a storm arose in time to diminish the fast-spreading flames before they did much damage. Joan describes her second day in the country as follows:—"As the day grew older, the heat increased, until, by night- fall, it was like a blanket muffling us into suffocation. Little gusts of wind wafted the scent of burning gum leaves over us." As the fire kept raging to- wards the bouse in which Joan was stay- ing, her uncle, with the help of several men, started to burn a firebreak round the house. Here is another little extract from J...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Rose's Secret [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

The Rose's Secret By Flossie Wilkes It was a cool evening, one of those which follows a hot, stuffy day, and Jean was water- ing her garden. No one was in sight, and as she turned from one of the flower beds, she heard a little voice—"Jean!" She saw nothing. Presently she heard the sound again. It seemed to come from the flowers. Was it possible? But yes! Jesn bent for- ward, towards the little rose-tree right on thc extreme edge of the bed. "Jean" came   the silvery tones again. "Will you give me some water, please, for I am very thirsty?" "Certainly," replied Jean, and she ran off to fetch some water from the nearest tap. "Thank you," mur- mured the rose, "now I'll tell you my PRIZE CARD to Jim Yeomans (13), 61 Pine Street, Rand- wick. story," she began. "A long time ago I was a fairy, and my name was Heart of Rose. I was very mischievous, and I played pranks on the other fairies, till at length the Queen turned me into a rose tree and put me here, where I am scorched...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Commercial ART an Attractive FIELD CAREERS FOR GIRLS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Commercial ART an Attractive   FIELD CAREERS FOR GIRLS By Our Special Commissioner An artistic field in which women every day are com- peting successfully with men is that of commercial art and newspaper illustration. Here, and in America and England, many women are being absorbed in these professions. IN the making of commercial de- signs suitable for ad- vertising women are particularly able, prob- ably due to the fact that they take more interest in advertise- ments than men. It is women who make the majority of purchasers, and, there- fore, they are more able to design things which will attract other women and make them buy. One has only to look at the American and English magazines to see that there is a future for the designer of clever advertisements, and here in Australia al- ready there is a fair market which will improve with the increase in newspapers and magazines. Like every other profession in which specialised ability is necessary, it takes time to become...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Those NAUGHTY 90'S! When ANGELICA went all A QUIVER! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Those NAUGHTY 90's! When ANGELICA went all A QUIVER! FOR a start, I did not do this. Artist Wep, my Weptile contemporary, was grub- bing about in his glory-box for the opener, and he came across an old, old copy of the "Girls' Own Paper" and came back to the office twittering and smelling strongly of lavender and old postcards. I said to him, "Back to the mother- craft section, mug!" and went on with my work, which consists of sorting out the letters the letter-sorter brings me. He hung about for a while, simpering, and then, touching me gently on the head, said: "What would you do if a man you had only been introduced to three or four times came and took your arm in the street?" "Smash him on the nose," I replied. "Well, that's funny," he mused. "It says here that you've got to become en- gaged to him." "Otherwise," he added, morosely, "you are doomed to a life of shame." "What's a life of shame?" I asked, be- coming interested."   "Oh, just drink and folly and high li...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
"STRAYS" Are Cared For in CITY OFFICE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

"STRAYS" Are   Cared For in CITY OFFICE THERE is an office at No. 10 Castle- reagh Street, where you will often be greeted by the yelp of a dog, and, on entering, perhaps find one or two sad- looking mongrels with bowls of water beside them, tied to the legs of a table not far from the feet of two busy typists. It sounds rather incongruous, but it is at the city office of the R.S.P.C.A., which is celebrating its Diamond Jubilee Ball at David Jones' on Tuesday, July 18. The animals are only kept there for the shortest possible time prior to their being taken by the society's ambulance to the Dogs' Home at Moore Park. On an average, 150 dogs and 350 cats are rescued from the streets of Sydney and suburbs each week by the R.S.P.C.A., which makes one realise what splendid work the society is doing. Inspired by the sight of children rid- ing on a diseased Newfoundland dog, it was a woman, Miss Compton Legge, who founded the first dogs' home in Sydney. It was the Grasmere Hom...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
EVE'S Daughter SYNOPSIS: Start Now [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

EVE'S Daughter SYNOPSIS You Can Start Now—   LILIAN DESMOND, a beauti-   ful golden-haired English     painter, married twice, both hus-   bands killed in the War. It seems   to her as if all hope and joy   are ended forever. She comes out   to New Zealand in search of a   new world to paint. She has re-   nounced love and has turned to   art as her only solace. She stays   in the home of the Ewings,   mother and son, whom she takes   to be poor, simple people. Old MRS. EWING, who insists   on arranging a stretcher on the   verandah under Bill's window for   Lilian to sleep out, "and yet she   would have been the last, the   very last, to see what was   coming" BILL EWING, the son, un-   married, original Anzac, a ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HOW Our Night Life Is CHANGING! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

HOW Our Night Life Is CHANGING! By JESSIE URQUHART Once, not so long ago, when the show was over most of us went straight home. If we were plutocrats we might have supper at an expensive hotel. If we were gay dogs we might have a hot snack at a street stall, but, gene- rally speaking, we caught the first tram, put out the billy, and went to bed. Now, whatever our de- gree, we go to a coffee shop. IT has become absolutely es- sential to finish off a night of high or low brow en- tertainment with a monumental toast- ed sandwich or a waffle. All over the city has sprung up a mushroom growth of these intriguing places, and their advent is responsible for a complete metamor- phosis of our night life. Every taste is catered for, and no country or period overlooked in the en- deavor to make the waffle and the sandwich more appetising. Should you be Neo British, then there is the shop with its open fireplace and air of cosiness, only faintly marred by a Californian awning. If you are artis-...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOUISE MACK'S DIARY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

LOUISE MACK'S DIARY Next week the author of this Diary will bring it to a close, in order to devote herself to a wonderful new feature, "Louise Mack Advises"—help-talks to Women. (See next week for this great new feature.) ESTHER JAMES BLOWS IN! YES, like a breeze she enters, the little Champion New Zealand hiker, coming to lunch one Sunday, and instantly with the entrance of this black-haired young girl with the dancing grey eyes, every- thing begins vibrating. I come to life. Gertrude comes to life. And as for little June and Barbara sitting eating their boiled fowl and mashed potato with tea- spoons, their big eyes nearly pop out of their heads, and all over their angelic little engaging faces is written "Here at last is the guest that's worth while!" "When I was walking from Melbourne to Sydney," the gay Esther is saying, "I heard such a funny noise. I heard some-   body laughing at me—at ME. I turned round angrily. Who could be laughing at ME like that, at ME, a je...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Murdoch's   Bargains   Contains 45 pieces of   high grade Cutlery in   £5/15/- |Table Forks, Dessert       |Forks, Dessert Spoons,       |Soup Spoons, Tea         OF CUTLERY |Spoons, and two Table         |Spoons; also half   |dozen Table and Des-         |sert Knives.           19/6 Dessert Knives . . . . Taylor's renowned "Eye Witness" Table Cutlery, stain- less steel and with grained xylonite handles. Dessert Knives, half-dozen . . . . 13/11 Table Knives, half-dozen. Usually 25/-. NOW . . . . 16/3 13/11 Snaps in Travel Needs SUIT CASES Solid Cowhide Suit Cases, high grade throughout. Size 20" 22" 24" 26" 28" Usually 35/6 3...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Know Antique FURNITURE Before you Collect [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

Know Antique FURNITURE Before you Collect INTERESTED in the collection of antique furniture, a reader has asked for details of a Queen Anne chair. The furniture we term "Queen Anne" is really Dutch in origin, having been introduced into England by William and Mary in 1688. Before their coming the English had been content with a much more severe line, and there was very little comfort in chair or settee. The distinctive feature of the Queen Anne chair is the cabriole leg (the earlier Eng- lish chair seat was usually supported by perfectly up-   right members, either turned, square, or rect- angular in plan).   This we took from   the Flemish or Dutch, who in turn had taken it from the French. The cabriole is very often perfectly free from ornamentation of any kind, the effect being gained from the shape alone. Sometimes the curve at the top of the leg terminates in a simple scroll, giving the toe the resemblance of an animal's paw. &nbsp...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
POLITICS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

POLITICS MR. JULIUS CREP- STOWE glanced at       the card which the         maid had handed him,         and said, "I don't         know who this is, but         show him in, any     way."       He was in his coun-                     try house m Sussex,   and wondered who it                   could be calling on   him there. His visitor was a thin-faced man, well enough dressed, but still lacking something i...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
"THE INSULT" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 15 July 1933

"THE INSULT" First of all, the play was altered from Java to Africa, so THEY could get the Foreign Legion in because girls like Foreign Legion heroes. Then THEY took Act 1 and made it Act 3, and cut up Act 2, so as to make Act 4 coincide with nothing on earth. Or so it seemed to the quiet man writhing in agony in a back stall of the dark Sydney theatre. Oh, the things THEY did to his stage play! They took a perfectly ordinary com- mon-or-garden overseer who was no- body much in the play, and they turned him into a splendid autocratic magnifi- cent Duce. Then THEY turned his quiet overseer's log-house into a Palace. And THEY dressed his wife in gor- geous gowns from Worth and Molyneux. But why? Harry Tighe writhed on, but could give himself no answer. And of course they left out his name! Now Harry Tighe has really a big reputation in London. He has written many novels published by Constable, and other leading publishers. Also he has had three plays staged in London, including "The I...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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