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Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

THE SPREAD OF _PROTESTANTISM IK ' ¦ : ' • • ¦¦ ' _" ": ¦ . ' ;¦ • _JHTEEEY. ;_- :" _- ' _- _' "¦ ¦ . _" '" ; _\ ' ' mny years ago, it wouJd not have been safe, we apprehend, for a Christian missionary from any foreign country to go into Turkey for the purpose of spreading his religious opinions. The old fires of Mahbniuiedatf fahaticilm tad still a good ._^eal of life in thenij and _required only to be stirred a little to' cause them to burst forth with something of their pristine vigor. _Even -less than forty _^ yea rs ago, when our excellent Amerraan missionaries first went to* that country, they did not deem it prudent to speak to a Turk, or any other believer in the Koran, on the * subject of (JhrLstianity, because they knew that conversion would _^immediately be followed with dieath. At that time death was the penalty for apostaeyfroar the religion of the Arabian impostor. Our, missionaries pursued a wiser course. Instead of approaching the Turks, they turned their attent...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

THE CIVIL WAB IS SYRIA. The following letters from Rev. W. A. Benion, and his wife, Mrs. L. G. Benton, Missionaries of tbe American Board, at Mt. Lebanon, in the very heart of the present disturbances, hate _jtisti been received by M,r. George W. Mears_, the Corresponding Secretary of Western Church S. S. Missionary Society, and promptly placed in _onr hands for publication. They will be found equal in interest to anything as yet published on the painful subject! Mrs. Benton holds the pea ola ready writer: BhawdtuijMt. Lebanon, June 6, I860. Bear Brother in Christ:—TJie existing •hostilities between the Bruzes and Christians of Mount Lebanon , commenced on Tuesday of last week at Beit Miri and several other points, almost simultaneously in the Metn district, at the north of our Station. It was fearfully sublime, and inftSprewibly _jMtiofal _b_#fo»e _morning to behold so jh any "villages, hamlets, and isolated houses in flames; and to hear the reports of their guns, and the wi...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

EOLUI1JCE Of THE APOSTLE PAtTL The following striking passage is extracted from that admirable little work entitled , "Saint Paul: Jive Discourses. By Adolph Monod. Translated from the French, by Rev. J. H. Myers, D. D." It sets forth in an impressive manner something of the influence of the great Apostle in moulding the heart and life of . .subsequent generations: ' • ¦ "I asked just no^;. WJthofcfcJ>aiD t Paul in_^he worid_^feow much to_^ Ine world lose_^-j_^ PV'I ask how. without Saint Paul in the _Bibfepand how much would your soul be a loser ? _.Brop out of yourNew_#estament the hundred pages at the top of which you read the name of Paul—surel y, I shall not go so fariks to affirm that there ho longer remains in your Bible that which can save you. Nothing but Jesus Christ alone is necessary for our salvation; and in order to know Jesus Christ , so little is required:, a word from his mouth, a word from one of His disciples, a wojdun the Old Testament,—what do I say...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

THE FRENCB_»OMANISTS OF According to the iBllowmg account m the Boston Recorder , not Ml of. Father Chiniquy* s people are satisfied _witfethe ecclesiastical affiliation into which h_^ _^p!_#nteredv. ;_, _||um|»ers of them are open to evang^^^ influences from other sources. • - ¦ ¦ . ' ¦ ' _E? _S '" ' ' « - The collision between Fa to the Romish Bishop, in whicti the new movement began, originated in Chicago, though the most considerable part of the _jwbrk**is now at St. Ann's and at Kankakee. But perhaps ho part of the field is more importantian the view of its being susceptible of cultivation. There is in Chicago a population of about, te&i thousand who use the French language, incluling Canad_^fc _French. Swiss, and others. Ana {these are_^orfually one people, with common n_^onal Bynipathies. And _ihis whole field is free fir Protestant cultivation. The past collisions with-the Irish bishop have wholly disaffected them and repelled them from the Romish hierarchy. ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

THE ERA OF PRAYER ft must be manifest to every careful observer of what is passing in the religious world, that it is entering what may be called a new phase, if we may so speak. It is entering on what may with propriety be called an era of peayer. It. is well nigh three years since the institution of the daily prayer , meetings took place—that of Fulton street being, we believe, the first. There must have been a great preparation in the minds of Christians throughout the world for the establishment of such meetings; else it is not possible to account for the readiness with which the proposition to hold them was received, not only in this country, but in e _^ very part of Christendom where there is any spiritual life in the churches. Mid where it has not been; " _.deemed best tojhold literally a daily prayer_^meeting, in very many cases these meetings have been very greatly increased in number and frequency, so that we eannot doubt that there has been a far larger amount of ea...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

_ORDIKATIOIT OF THE HINDOO UNITARIAN. A. Boston correspondent pf the Press & Tribune _^ of Chicago, _,who is by no means unfriendly to Unitarianism _^ writes as follows in respect to the Brahmin cdnyert, who has been, for two years, paraded before the churches and public assemblies of that denomination in this country. • ' ¦ • Gangooly, the ypung Hindoo, who has been in this country two years for education, was ordained in Rev. Edward 32. -Hale's church, Sabbath the 10th.: He has since sailed for_^England on his way to India. I think he is a failure. He is very shrewd, cunning even, but wholl y untrained and unregeherate: He was_^"baptized Philip_^ but has never taken the name. Jugut Chunder (moon of the world) he prefers to. write himself. A Brahmin does not lose caste until he recognizes baptism by using his baptismal name, so that Jugut can return" with his $1,500 and his two years of ovation to the embrace of his old faith if .he chooses. My own decided opinion is ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

'/-$****{• Selected for the American Presbyterian. ITEUSTIN TH1E As feeble as tbe bruised reed, Infirm to will and do; . Oft working out the ungrateful deed 'Twere better to eschew: How were the sinking soul dismayed Could it not _cr_/to thee, " Father, what time I auvafraid Then wlU I truBt m thee." When hope is faint, and faith is weak, Ahd fears thespir it M, And I a ¦strong _assnrahoe seek , That thou art gracious still, . I rest upon thy promise-word, To thine own heart I flee—" Fatherwhat time I am afraid, Then will I trust In thee." When mortal paleness marks my cheek, And dimness veils nty eye, And hoping only in thy grace, I J»y m<**_rttn *_o <Ho { If entering on that vale of shade, No sun nor star I see, _" father, what time I am afraid, Then will I trust in Thee.1 ' —i > a > 1 ' For .the American Presbyterian. INFLUENCE. Far la the distant years some deed of beauty, 1 Hath struck the key-note of a bold refrain, And many a noble act and ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

EpiAIirS W_^lOUff -TK GAVES. Attention has lately been attracted to the interesting discoveries of human bones in the small caves with those of extinct animals; but it is important that hasty conclusions should not be drawn respecting the contemporaneonsness of man wjth those animals: and Sir Charles Lyell has already noticed the very pertinent fact that the human skulls are of the Caucasian variety, belonging! therefore, to one of those races which now inhab_>it Europe, like the woman whose body was foiiind with a coin of Carausius, in the Pavilanc cjave. The conclusion that because their bpiiei are deposited in the s_^me cave, men and ixtirct animals .must have lived at the same period, is as unnecessary as it is unreasonable; and an_^ one who has pbseryed the process by which cav_^ns and fissures in some parts of the world are-fillBd with red-cave earth f similar to that which may be found in many of pur own limestone formations, will cease to feel surprised at the_^...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

SIR CHAELES NAPIER'S ESTIMATE OF MILITARY GLORY. Nineteen long letters from Lord Ellenborough! He has made me Governor of Seihde, with additional pay; and he has ordered the captured guns to be east into a triumphal column, with our name. I wish.he would let me go back to my wife and girls, it would be more to me than pay, glory and honors. This is glory! is it ? Yes. Nine princes have surrendered their swords to me on the field of battle, and their kingdoms have been conquered by me, and attached to my own country. Well, all the glory that can be desired is. mine, and I care so little for it, that, the moment I can, all shall be resigned, to live quietly with my wife and girls; no honor or riches repays me for absence from them. Otherwise this sort of life is no life to me; is agreeable, only as it may enable me to do good to these poor people. Oh! if I can do any good thing to serve them where so much blood has been shed in accursed war, I shall be happy. May I never see ano...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

SUDDEN DEATH. One or our exchanges wonders wny tne JBJpiseop ' al Litany should include a petition against " sudden death." The explanation is not difficult. That petition is a relic of the times when "sacramental theology" had usurped the place of evangelical ; when priestly absolution • and extreme unction were the orApdoxc prescriptions for a peaceful and safe, death;/ ' or, earlier _stjll_, when hpthing was, thought worthy of more frequent mention than " the care of the Church to distribute the _eucharist to all dying persons that were capable of receiving it/} Was not sudden death properly an object of dread, if it had power to step between the soul " ready to- perish/' and the sacraments which were necessary to its salvation —or at least to ife assurance of salvation? Was it not meet that the Church should seek to avert so fearful a doom from her members, by the daily supplications of the Litany ? And now, when the reason of the prayer has passed away, is it not well to ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

SOME ONE MXTST BEAY. . A man pf learning and talent, _" but an unbeliever, was travelling in Manilla on a scientific expedition. He was escorted by a native, and, as they were about to start, the native, with the refined politeness which characterizes the Orientals, requested the white stranger to pray to his God. This Was probably the only thinghe could have been asked to do without being able to comply; and on his declining, the native said, "Well, some God must be prayed to, so you will excuse me if I pray to mine." " Foil many a shaft at random sent , Finds mark the archer never meant." So it was in this case. The unbeliever was rebuked by a heathen, and the man of science who had-gone there in/quest of natural curiosities, ieturaed, having found the " pearl of great price/' His next visit is, to be as a missionary to preach Christ.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

NO PAY NO PREACH An attempt has been made to disparage Mr. Lincoln because he received pay for a public lecture given in this city, instead of _travelling from Chicago and back and lecturing at his own cost. Mr. Greeley having been called out upon the subject _^ states with characteristicjiBsller^^aHterters " tried both ways, and-is_^_faliiEed that to lecture for _.pay-isTaucH_^more comfortable than to bear one's own expenses for the sake of enlightening or benefiting other people. Mr. Greeley is quite in the right of it. There is a lesson here for churches. Tfflnifesare_^ churches for which not even their expenses are proffered them. It strikes us that the rule of equity and propriety here is very simple, and ought alwajs to be observed. _HT. Y. Independent.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

"HE WENT AWAY _SORROWS!." The sorrow experienced was connected with, going away from Christ. No one was ever made sorrowful by coming to Christ. Sooner shall the traveller, whose eyes have rested for days on the barren, burning sands of the desert, be made sorr rowful by reaching the oasis with its refreshing waters, its green herbage, its oleanders and olives; sooner shall he who has been long an exile in foreign lands, be made sorrowful by approaching his native shores _^ and by crossing the threshold of his home to find all his heart-treasure safe, than a guilty, wandering, outcast, c ondemned sinner shall be made sorrowful by coining to Christ.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

_triTIOH OF PR1SBYTERIANS. The great number of fragmentary bodies into which the, Presbyterian family is divided, and the seeming tendency to division and subdivision exhibited in the denomination, have long been matters of reproach in the eyes of those disaffected towards us. Bat the truth is, it is because Presbyterianistn aims at outward unity ; because it is not content with isolated church-sessions, Presbyteries, _^ind Synods, but seeks to unite all in one comprehensive, representative body, or General Assembly, that these divisions become apparent. A tendency to union, no less than to division, must therefore be acceded to us. In regard to .our divisions, they maybe accounted for, in part, _nfrom the fact, that jaere outward ehuroh-unity, though held by us to be valuable, and always kept in view as an ultimate end, is not regarded as equally _important with purity of doctrine, or correctness of practice. Wherever such unity would bind us to those who seriously differ f...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

EDITOB'S TABLE. THE SAND HILLS OF JUTLAND, by _Hansr Christian Andersen, author of the " Improvisatore," etc. Boston : Ticknor & Fields, MDCCCLX.. 12mo., pp., 267. This is- a collection of choice tales by the inimitable Scandinavian story teller Andersen. The wild and desolate landscape of the north of Europe, and all the peculiarities in manners and customs of the inhabitants, are reproduced with the fidelity and finish of a Flemish painting. There is, however, an excess of the marvellous and fabulous which will repel many readers. The mechanical execution- of the book is admirable. For sale by J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philada. ECHOES OP EUROPE, OR WORD PICTURES OF TRAVEL, by E. K. Washington Philadelphia: James Challen & Son, No. 25 South 6th _st. 8vo. 697. This is an agreeable book of European Travel over the usual routes. The style is animated and the author's views interesting. On the well trodden field which he has traversed, there is, of course, b...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

_RSLATIOHS OF THE PRESBYTEEIAN CHURCH TO THE WOBK OF HOME _MISSIONS. Under tins Heading the General Assembly s Commission of Investigation, appointed at Wilmington, in 1859, present their report to the churches. Including the appendix, it covers a space !of_^8 closely _jprin_,ted octavo, pages.;,: jjhis fulness,ifowever, is due'to the subjects tre|te37 and to the peculiar juncture in our Home Missionary Affairs. The roost vital interests of a denomination, arc involved in the manner in which its Home Missionary affairs are conducted. And the conviction has become wide-spread among our churches that, in this respect, we were suffering grievous loss and injury. Indeed the tardiness of our growth as a denomination begins to be ascribed, in great part, to the unsatisfactory working of our chosen methods of Home Missionary action. These methods have been dear to us; our separate ex- _, istence is in part due to our attachment to them; for them, we, as. a denomination, suffered the ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

THE LATE DE. _HOTTGHTOff. The following, which we take from the columns of the last Evangelist, furnishes some additional facts of the life of our late associate, which will be iDtereating to his bereaved friends and to. our readers generally. _; • Dr. Houghton was a native of Vermont, and was born to _' the energetic and self-reliant experiences of the majority of our New England youth. If we mistake not, he owed _niuch of his early religious impressions to the instructions of % very intelligent and pious mother, who has preceded him but a few months to the grave. She lived to see her instructions crowned by the success of her children in various useful and responsible positions, A sister of Dr. Houghton was, until her marriage, a principal teacher at Le Roy University, and the extensive printing house of a brother at Cambridge, is unrivalled for the ele_^ gance of its letter-press. ¦ _^ The deceased was a graduate of Vermont University, and a fellow-student with Prof Gv'W. T...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

THE LATE LIEUT. GEORGE P. WELSH.! We find in one of the York, Pa., papers an account of the funeral of this estimable young officer of the Navy, which took place on the 18th of June at that borough. He was the son of Henry Welsh, Esq., president of the Board of Trustees of the York PresbyterianChurch, and formerly Naval Officer in this city, and a brother of W. H; Welsh, Esq., late Speaker of the Senate of this State. As a matter of interest to, his bereaved friends in that ' section of the country, and in this city, we subjoin a part of Rev. Mr. Street's address at the funeral:-— Lieutenant George P. Welsh, whose remains we are about to entomb, was born on the 26th day of March, 1824. In early life he devoted himself to the service of his eountfy. _^ _j_^V'henvsis_^_enuyjBars of age he entered the _^ U5 Bi_%d States Navy; atthV age of twenjy_^ fewo_^he received his warrant as a Passed MJdffiipman; and at thirty-one he received his _^ comhiission as Lieutenantwhich he held up ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

commencement HAMILToS COLLEGE. This has been week, in this institution•:—Literary Carnival The exercises were opened on Sabbafh afternoon with the annual sermon , of President Fisher to the graduating class. His theme was the Characteristics of the Gospel as the Great Scheme, of Human Elevation, and its contras|with all schemes of mere human origin. He spoke of the spirit or life of the gospel,—its truths, such as a personal God, the creation of nfan in his image, the fall, the scheme of recover! and the influence of the Holy Spirit, and finallV the means of influence it devises] or the _organization of the Christian Church, the institution.of the ministry, and so on. In conclusion he spoke of opposite schemes; natoralism, which de_^el tnf_^ depravity of man, and hence tbe_^_necessi ty of an atonement; culture and artfin leading man back to God; and the _discovery, arrangement, and application of _,the principles of _pott|ieal economy for the recoveryf bf the race. This iff ff...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 26 July 1860

_~m_~ * EEV. R. G. WILDER AND THE KOLAPOOR _MISSION. It will be remembered by those who attended .the last annual meeting of the American _Bpafd _^ 'which was held in this city, that the _Prudential Cotnmittee for various reasons * ,recomn«_Sde& the discontinuance of Jibe Kolapoor Mission with which Rev. Mr. Wilder and lady had been connected. Mr. Wilder, who was present, made an earnest and able remonstrance against this recommendation, but without effect. The mission was discontinued by act of the Board. The missionary and his wife, however, are devotedly attached to. the field in which they have been the only laborers, _<and where they have had encouraging prospects of success. The mission house also in the city of Kolapoor, was built with the private funds of Mr. Wilder and his numerous and influential friends in that portion of India, and forms a convenient rallyingplace for the mission. For these reasons, Mr. and Mrs. Wilder purpose to return, and cultiv...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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