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Title: Auckland Star Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,420 items from Auckland Star, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A STEEPLEJACK'S FALL [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

A STEEPLEJACK'S FALL INTO A TANK OF WATER. c LONDON, September 10. While repairing the highest chimney stack in Glasgow George Armstrong fell ninety feet, head first, into a tank of water completely missing the stout iron bars guarding the tank set a yard apart. He received minor injuries, but as a result of concussion his condition ia serious —("Times."). . __m»^

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
TIGER OF FRANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

TIGER OF FRANCE. VISIT TO AMERICA. RESPONSIBILITIES TO ALLIES. NOT ENDED BY PEACE. (By Cable.—Press Association.—Copyright.) (Received .11.30 a.m.) PARIS, September 10. The announcement that M. Llemenccau intends to tour America explaining that "The rights and duties in a world crisis of each nation where the same j victory made all the Allies solidly re- j sponsible for the future," has created the j greatest interest. It shows that M. , Clemenceau after three years' retirement, intends to return to public life in Prance. It is believed that M. Clemenceau is actuated by the announcement that Mr. Lloyd George is writing a book giving his version of the momentous events of the war, also by M. Poincare's unsuccessful handling of the delicate liuropean situation. M. Clemenceau's return is regarded as big with possibilities for Europe. M. Clemenceau's visit to America has brought him a telegram from America saying: "You seem to consider America lac...

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
CONTROL OF INDIA. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

CONTROL OF INDIA. MB. LLOYD GEORGE'S SPEECH. OPPOSITION IN DELHI. (Received 9 a.m.) DELHI, September 10. By 48 votes to 34, in the face ol strong Government opposition, the Legislature adopted a resolution conveying a message to th& Home Government viewing with grave concern Mr. Lloyd George's recent speech in the House of Commons, which is considered by the Legislature to be in conflict with his solemn declaration regarding the new constitution, and calculated to create serious apprehensions in India regarding the attainment of Home Rule and the Indianisation of the services. Several Indian speakers emphasised, regarding the Civil Services' complaints, that they were not now rulers of the country, but servants of the Legislature.'—(A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
AMPUTATION IN THE STREET. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

AMPUTATION IN THE STREET. FOOT CAUGHT UNDER MOTOR. IMPOSSIBLE TO RELEASE IT. (Received 10 a.m.) LONDON. September 10. A boy of seven years, while alighting from a. tramcar at Norwood, was knocked down by a taxicab, his leg being caught between the chassis bar and the engine drum. Unavailing efforts to release him lasted for an hour, while the boy screamed in agony. Three doctors who were summoned decided to amputate the leg above the ankle, and all traffic in the street was suspended, while an anaesthetic was administered, and the operation was completed behind a screen of rugs and blankets.—(A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
INDIANS IN DOMINIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

INDIANS IN DOMINIONS. SERFS OR CITIZENS? (Received 2.30 p.m.) LONDON, September 10. Lord Meston, formerly Finance Minister of the Governor-General's Council, in an address to the British Association, appealing for an extension of complete Imperial citizenship to Indians, said that despite statesmen : s professions belief prevailed in India that helotry, not citizenship, was the status designed for Indians in certain Dominions and colonies. He cited Fiji, South Africa, and Kenya, and advocated an impartial Imperial tribunal to arbitrate in such cases. — (Reuter.) j

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
McCONACHY'S RETURN. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

McCONACHY'S RETURN. I NOT AS GOOD AS ENGLAND'S BEST. (Received 11 a.m.) LONDON, September 10. The "Sunday Express" says that Clark McConachy, the New Zealand billiardist, is better than George Gray, but is far below the standard of the first-class performers in England. He could not hold or be dangerous to them even if he made all possible use of the red ball. The rapid way in which Newman, Smith, and Faulkner'made large breaks was an eyeopener to McConachy.—(A. and N.Z.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
REBELLIOUS MAHSUDS. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

REBELLIOUS MAHSUDS. ANOTHER TRIBE SUBMITS. (Received 10.30 a.m.) DELHI, September 10. Another recalcitrant Mahsud tribe has submitted to the terms offered by the British forces, thus relieving the Waziristan situation. Only one tribe remains obdurate—(A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
NOT DONE BY GERMANS. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

NOT DONE BY GERMANS. A WRONG ACCUSATION. BRUSSELS, September 10. The shooting of two Belgian soldiers, named Stass and Ruckweert, at Obercassel, on the Rhine, has taken a sensational' turn. Germans were wrongly accused °f tne double crime. Evidence shows that Stass, who had been drinking, left a cafe near the barracks, and in delirium tremens or by a tragic mistake shot Ruckweert, and then committed suicide.—(A. and N.Z. Cable.),

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
DAIL EIRANN MEETS. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

DAIL EIRANN MEETS. ONE REPUBLICAN ATTENDS. EJECTED AFTER SCENE. NEW CABINET SELECTED. (Br Cable.—Press Association—Copyright) LONDON. September 10. The Dai! Eirann met to-day. The only anti-treaty member present was Mr. L. Ginnell (Longford and Westmeath), who did not participate in the rebellion. Mr. Ginnell on many occasions before the withdrawal of Sinn Fein members from the House of Commons created scenes in the British Parliament. Mr. V. T. Cosgrave and Professor M. Hayes were unanimously elected President and Speaker respectively. Mr. Cosgrave announced the following members of the Cabinet: — Foreign Affairs, Mr. Desmond Fitzgerald. Home Affairs, Mr. B. O'Higgins. Local Government, Mr. E. Blythe. Agriculture, Mr. P. J. Hogan. Commerce, Trade, and Labour, Mr. J. McGrath. Defence, Mr. R. J. Mulcahy. Postmaster-General, Mr. J. Walsh. I Honorary Minister, Mr. E. Duggan. Mr. Ginnell at the opening circulated a notice of motion challenging the Provisional Government's right to make ...

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
DARING FRAUD. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

DARING FRAUD. TRUST COMPANY IMPOSED ON. GANG GETS £32,000. (Received 10.30 a.m.) LONDON, September 10. A daring fraud was perpetrated on the London branch of the Guaranty Trust Company of New York. The branch' received a cable from China instructing it to transfer £32,000 to a man in London. The message was in the bank s own special cipher, and the money was paid. ' ~ The fraud was not discovered until j mail advices showed no confirmation of the cablegram. When the culprit got the money he cabled it back to China in two separate amounts. The bank | succeeded in receiving £15,000. I The ringleader of the gang of operators has since been heard of in Canade.—(A. and~N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
CHANNEL SWIM ASPIRANTS. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

CHANNEL SWIM ASPIRANTS. NOT LIKELY TO SUCCEED. LONDON, September 8. There are still many aspirants to swim the English Channel, the chief stimulus thereto being the prize of £1000 offered by a London paper. There is little prospect of anyone succeeding; most of them are about as likely to succeed in swimming the Atlantic as the Channel, for the water is getting colder and strong tides almost invariably intervene, sweeping the swimmer back to mid-Channel, when he has reached four or five miles from the coast. The Australian Tom Morris was regarded as the most likely to achieve success, but the weather was too much for him. Channel boatmen think it will be a long time before anyone succeeds in emulating Burgess' great feat. — (A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
ENGLAND'S BOWLING HOPE. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

ENGLAND'S BOWLING HOPE. GILLIGAN OF SUSSEX. LONDON, September 8. In the present dearth of first-class fast bowlers in England, the doings of Arthur Gilligan, captain of Sussex, are being watched with much interest. Many regard him as England's hope for the future. He is the fastest bowler in England to-day, and on several occasions skittled out his opponents cheaply, his pace off the pitch beating the very best batsmen. Gilligan, for Sussex, has taken 116 wickets at an average cost of 17.25. (A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
BANK TRANSFER RATES. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

BANK TRANSFER RATES. AN AIX-ROtTND REDUCTION. LONDON, September 10. The Associated Australian and New Zealand banks have fixed the selling rates on Australia and New Zealanc for drafts and mail transfers at 10/ and on cable transfers at 17/6 premium. The rate of purchase of documentary bills or Australia and New Zealand has beer reduced to 2 per cent discount on sighl bills, with an increase of one-half pel cent for every additional 30 days. AI; the alterations will commence on Sep temh* 2«~4L «a Si &Mt*

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
AMERICAN RAIL STRIKE [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

AMERICAN RAIL STRIKE MEETING OF THE LEADERS. ALL SERVED WITH WRITS. (By Cable.—Press Association.—Copyright.) NEW YORK, September 10. Messrs. Jewell, Johnston, and Ryan, the leaders directing the railwaymen's strike, have been served with writs in Chicago under the Government's injunction as they arrived to attend a, secret conference. The Attorney-General; Mr. H. M. Daughcrty, announced to-day that the Government would not be a party to any negotiations between the railways and the strikers. He added that the suggestion that such negotiations would be interfered with by the Government's injunction was wholly unjustified. It is learned that a conference of 50 railway company executives called to consider a settlement of the strike came to a sudden end owing to disagreement over separate settlements proposed by the various lines. — (A. and X.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
CURRENCY STABILITY. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

CURRENCY STABILITY. CANADA HOLDS THE PALM. WRESTED FROM AMERICA. LONDON, September 8. Canada has wrested from the United States first place in currency stability, American dollars being quoted in Montreal on Thursday at a quarter of a cent discount, compared with 25 to 30 cents premium at the beginning of the year. The chief factors contributing to the change are: Firstly, steady improvement in Canadian trade and industrial and agricultural production; secondly, slack American trade conditions resulting In investment of American capital in Canadian securities; thirdly, restriction of American exports to Canada owing to strikes. The "Daily Express" points out that Canada cannot afford to borrow from Britain at the present rate of exchange, with the prospect of having to repay some day at par, when she can obtain loans on a parity basis from America. (A. and >>Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
EXECUTING THE INSANE. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

EXECUTING THE INSANE. GERMAN " FRIGHTFULNESS." TO EASE ECONOMIC STRAIN. BERLIN, September 8. A proposal to ease the economic position in Germany by killing the incurably insane was made in an article in a leading criminal law journal, the "Strafrechts Zeitung." It states that therc'are 83,400 insane in Germany, of whom at least half are incurable, and should be painlessly executed by asylum surgeons. The article suggests that permits for the executions should be granted on the application of relatives, after thorough investigation by a highly specialised court.— (A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
SHUT UP IN A BOX. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

SHUT UP IN A BOX. AN INFANT'S DEATH. ] 14-YEAR-OLD BOY CHARGED. , LONDON, September 8. An inquest was held at Portsouth on the mummified body of George Smith, aged three years, found in a box in an attic after he had been missing from home for six weeks. Leonard Kearingham fourteen years old, son of the occupant of the house in which the body was found, was arrested. In a statement to the police, he said Smith asked him for a drink. He carried the child upstairs, put him into a box, shut the lid and put I the box under the bed. ' "I did not remember anything more I about it," he said, "until I had a dream jin a cell and part of it came back." I After being charged with causing the death of Kearingham he said "They'll think I done it purposely." | The inquest was adjourned. Smith's j parents were not acquainted with Kearinghan.— (A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
CHINA FACING WAR AGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

CHINA FACING WAR AGAIN. MILITARISTS IN CONTROL. PRESIDENT MAY RESIGN. NEW YORK, September 10. Advices from Peking state that China faces another civil war. The country is on the verge of a new change of Ciovcrnment that threatens to give the militarists complete control. The President, Li Yuan Hung, expresses great anxiety over the increase of power of the Military Governor, who is now admittedly in control of Parliament. Every meeting of Parliament since August 5 has been attended by violence. The adoption of a constitution which -was considered to be the first step, now appears remote. Cabinet members declare that Li Yuan Hung is disheartened and is ready to resign.— (A. and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
ST. LEGER FIELD. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

ST. LEGER FIELD. POOREST LOT ON RECORD. LONDON, September 8. The scratching of all the favourites in | the St. Leger leaves only second-class : horses in the race. It is doubtful if it i ever has been contested by such a poor j lot. Lord Woolavington's pair Preston I Grange and Fred Power seem to be the , best left in. As they are being trained at different stables, the former at Gilpin's, and the latter at Fred Darling's, Lord Woolavington intends to run both on their merits. The race is so open that so far it has been impossible to make a market, layers offering five to one on the field, but nothing is doing. Villars, Ceylonese and Corcyrian are the others mentioned as having a chance.—(A and N.Z. Cable.)

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
AMERICAN TENNIS. [Newspaper Article] — Auckland Star — 11 September 1922

AMERICAN TENNIS. NATIONAL SINGLES CONTEST. LONDON, September 10. Tn the national lawn tennis singles championship J. O. Anderson defeated Reid. 6—4, o—7, o—7, and P. O'Hara I Wood defeated Kemon, 6—3, 6—2, 6—l. £fe. and N.Z. Cable.) i

Publication Title: Auckland Star
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
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