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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

CYNTHIA GREY'S DAILY CORRESPONDENCE '(1) When a girl calls for me to go to church and we have gone on our way when her beau appears, should I walk behind them or with them? (2) Is a girl of 14 too( young- to be followed home from church by a boy of 16? (3) How old should a girl be to vear corsets? (4) How long should a girl of 14' who is 4 feet inches tall year her 'dresses; and comb her hair? (5) What is the significance of a boy's giving a girl a pin? Teressa. A.-r (1) With them. (2) No, but she is too young to go out in the evening without her mother or "another older woman. (3) Depends' upon her development. If she is large and Nvell developed she may don staysat16. Before that'she-may wear-corset waists. '(4) Dresses half-way between knees and shoe tops. Hair parted, rolled at sides and braided in one or two' braids and tied with broad ribbon bows. (5) Same meaning as any other gift that he likes her well enough to make her a present. eleven at St. Paul's church." The engraver ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

Some Give Away If you Should die what would you do with your body? I don't know. I'd seil mine to a medical student Then yoU'd be giving yourself dead away. ADOLF LOSES HIS CHA SDOUV CAN MAKE Of FOB ALL YOU HAP SOFFE.Rea'TROJM ME. I J03T CAMS FROM Dei BRCTZIUeNXf SOMePoOY R3R HER VACANT V rtM i ojes soo?ewB courj Bench. The Difference Do you know the difference between capital and labor? No. 1 Well, if I loaned you a dolJ lar, that would becapital. If J I tried to get it back that s would be labor. He'd Also Get His Board If you were about to learn a trade, which trade would you prefer? I'd like to be a carpenter. Why? Then I'd nail everything I see. -1 I, - i I, i - i, r . ..., As I was coming out of a hencoop today (I had been stealing eggs) I heard the chicken say to the rooster: "There's the man I've been laying for!" . First Comedian If the devil lost his tail, where would he go to get another one? Second Comedian To the liquor store where they retail spirits! o o Even',the con...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

T NICE AS A SUPREME JUDGE, THANKS TO A LOOSE SUIT . bcHt. first r shau. see &f OYeZ, oyez, Y60 MUER PROPER Poise UND DEK 500PRSHC DIGNITY FOR XeK CHOB. pOT ON COURT JSS NOtV . BCSS JUSTICe'S "ROBC ON C0Md IN SESSION.' A-v a XU3nl VEN I HAK6 A NOISE v . ' ' rs R - UKS, OPENINO COVRT. y p 1 V ?oiimi7ovcio

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

GET A RED BALL AND TEACHfCHILDREN MUSIC Xlm$iFA mSZzmM .11 Mrs. Fanny Hughey and a child Color music for children : This Js the newest 'kind of 'music Mn'stead of beirig a dreary study in black and white, music is already 'rainbow tinted. .' . It is Mrs Fannie Hugheyof St. Louis -who has worked out this ingenious method of teaching. "A child at the age of 6 months -carF begin to associate .tone and color," declares Mrs. Hughey. "The younger children are the more plastic their minds, and the cmore elastic their muscles and vocal chords. "A child candearn to sing 'Dodo, just as well,as to say 'Da-da' and-.if given a red ball-at the time the ione is sounded it soon.asso- Learning Music by Color Method ciates the tone and the color. 'I maintain a mother' can begin a childls musical education at the age of 6 months, if the child is a normal, 'healthy baby." Mfs.'Hughey begins her musi.caljwork with, children by telling a story; They are not placed at the' piano. They sit about the teache...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

7 "So the queen waved her wand and out flew a red bird down into Jane's hand" here the teacher slips a red bird of cardboard into the child's hand "and the little bird began to sing Do-do-do:.!1 The teacher sounds middle C and the child gazing at-the red bird, unconsciously fixes -in -mind the color and associates with it the C tone.. "This little bird always sings v 'Do-do', so we call it theJDo-bird Do-do, sing the same little song, children. Very good. Now the fairy queen let another little' bird down from fairyland. It flew through the rainbow and fluttered into Ruth's hand," and the teacher hums softly "Me-me-me." "Oh, the little Mi-bird," exclaim the children; while the teacher summons! the-little orange Re-bird and the little green Ka-bird, and shows, where the five birds nest on the piano. Then she producer a five-barred fence upon a sheet of gray paper and points out the favorite perching place of each. In this maner the scale is developed -first, a singing bird col- . ored...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

mmmmmmmm SUFFRAGE CHECK IS LATEST WEAPON i New York, Dec 15. The suffrage check is the newest curiosity among the bank cashiers. - "Votes for Women" is stamped .with colored ink just above the o- place for the signature. It is of such size that those who get the slip of paper cannot fail to recognize the silent appeal for franchise rights for women. - STORM WARNINGS Of Everett True. rA young rough who thought he was big enough lo spit on my shoes when I passed the corner now admits that he ought to be .taking the air in a go-cart. The best way to secure world peace is to cut out the confettithrowing when I am around. A nuisance dies. It has to be killed. If my triplets grow up and attempt to dress to look like some of those billboard clothing chaps, I'll muss them up. Any body that tries to seU me tickets tb a cat shoyv better have "nine lives. Those two fellows whose heads 'I knocked together the other day were an actor who had allowed himself to be advertised to appear at a benefi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

THE SINGLE TAX-pWHAT IS IT? Article No. 5. By Edmund Norton. The greatest one bookin.aH the world telling about the Single Tax is "Progress and Poverty," published in San Francisco, California, in 1879. The greatest one thought in that book is this: 'Private Prop-' erty in Land Must Be Destroyed' The one marvelously simple, means for doing that tremendous thing without harm to any one, without revolution, without any disturbance to the normal development of society, is : to simply leave to every individual all that he, may make by working for him'self, or co-operatively working with any or all of his-fellow men, and then taking for society all that it creates in its collective capacity by a Single Tax on the value of Bare land, exclusive of. all improvements, until the entire rent of landtis taken into-the public treasuries of society to be expended for th society that creates these valuesj The keynote to the spirit of Henry George's work is found in his own words where he say, in P...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

this age came Henry George's philosophy a philosophy of Ibve, with peace, plenty and brotherhood attendant, and construction as its motto. In these examples we have the two opposing poles of human thought one progressive and constructive; the other obstructive and destroying. Henry George's 4books have been translated 'probably into more languages than any other books of modern tjmes and there has developed all over the earth a great following of splendid men and women who art rapidly becoming known as belonging to the "Georgean School of Sociology." The ignorant sometimes call them socialists or anarchists ; but they are really neither. Anarchy proposes the ultimate elimination of coercive government; socialism proposes the perfecting of coersive government till it takes in nearly everything. Anarchy is an indefinite, impractical and impossible abstraction; socialism is a partisan, sectarian movement promising a perfect state of society made of out of imperfect people. These tenden...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

N THE STORY OF' THE McNAMARA TRIAL How Sam Bfcowne, Detective, "Got the Goods" on Dynamiters ?- By W. G. Shepherd. Los. Angeles, CaL, Dec. 18. While W. J. Burns stalks aliout the country, shouting his ideas to the press, the man who really "got" the goods" on- the McNamaras sits in the office of the district attorney at Lqs Angeles. He is Samuel L. Browne, chief of the county detectives. In theame office, in an iron case, there is almost; a" ton of evi4ence against the i McNamaras, most of which was, collected by Browne and his men. It's a separate story how Ursula Hitchcock, Browne's office girl, did some of the most brilliant detective woric-in police annals on the'McNamara case. - "On the morning-of the Times explosion, Oct. 1," says Browne, "I .received a telegram from the district attorney, belljngme to get all the Evidence I could in the case.- Tlje first thing I did was to send ojlt detectives and have them take a census" of the four blocks surrounding the Times building. Thi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

t jTKis was Vclevertriclcontheirj "dock; after rentfngHKe boat, ttieyj F&rt, "becausb-4vhen?tftey left the" "deoartedas- the--pastime. Wheti" Bi mKKN m i TBI ' "'""""iimJm J ' Capt. John D. Fredericks, standing before iron- case", irt, which, ton, of evidence. against McNamaras was-kept. - He is holding the revolver which was'found inJifnMcNarnara's grip and also a clock" ' hornb. - Note .the hotel registers and .'the itwo . grips in which dy na-'rrifte-was carried,:. " .".- . ; s .'..,. ..:'- 'it ,. - -j ft. ' .,;"..$ i

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

they Hrew up to purchase the dynamite, the boat was the Peerless, .and yet, when they returned the tboat to the dock it was .the Pas-, 'time. , , "All this time I was getting descriptions of the three'men from ,the various persons I could find .who had seen the three dynamite .buyers. J added up all the points that were given- me about their respective features their noses, .eyes, haif, and so forth. "When I finallysent otit a circular, describing the men, I had a composite word picture of them that was made up of descriptions given .'me by 200 persons. "As soon as John McNamara saw one of these circulars, he said to Ortie McManigal, in "Indianapolis: 'That Browne'had got a genuine pen picture of that kid' brother of mine. He'll have to put out this "cigarette" .and ."fairy" business. You take him. up into the Wisconsin woods and go hunting for a month.' '"h had mentioned tin my description that Jim McNamara smoked cigarettes and referred 'to' girls as 'fairies.' " - PASSES OFFICES ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

'EASY MONEY FOR THE WISE FAKER IS THE SOMETHING FOR NOTHING GAME . Something for nothing is a "bait that attracts a lot of suckers who -ought to know better. It doesn't make much difference whether the game played is called high finance, speculative business, or plain gambling the main object is money, easy money, and as much of it as can be got. The game is always so figured and played, that the percentage of chances are against the wise guy who thinks he has an even break for the coin he is after. The business frame-ups and systems used to separate the boob from his money are as many and as varied as the loaded 'dice, marked, cards,- hold-outs, -chip cops and other sure thing devices use by gamblers. Eugene Stockton has just been sentenced by Judge Landis to serve three years in the federal prison at Leavenworth, Kas. In offering his sure thing device to the gambling" fraternity, Stockton showed that the sport's chance for getting easy money was mighty slim when he stacked up agai...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

tHe Hand. Touch a chip with It and it s$uck to the paste. The check was palmed with nobody the wiser. "We had a card punch, too. A man could sit intp a poker game and in half an hour have the whole deck marked so he would know every hand as it was dealt. It takes a smart poker player to play with marked cards "because gamble. Many a $100 bill Has been gathered by the fellow whd knows how and when to be polite." a I "Always make your victint think he is getting the best of Tt Let him haveall the advantage Don't wrangle. When the cleans up comes he wont have a thing to hang a squeal on." "Don't be nervous. Thow ouF p ' " ' : I "B,,,,L!,1 ) "Don't be nervous," says Edward Stockton's book of instruct tions, "throw out dice in a careless way they will work for you." there are so many to keep track of, buFthat card punch made a lot of fellows rich." - Stockton had a pamphlet called "Book of Instructions" which he sent out to patrons. It was full of sage advice. ' Witness the following: . ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

'Always the same old story get the coin; get it honestly if you can, but don't hesitate at anything to get it. This seems to be a sort of national curse. Take the Vice Commission report, go over the Civil Service Commission investigation, dig into Board of Trade schemes, look over the insurance expose, get next to some of the tricks of big business, and you will commence to realize that -the easy money crowd df any community is paying a mighty high price for the riches they are so hungry for. Graft, or easy money, isn't honest money. Every sneak and thief who gets it, big or little, -o- knows it isn't clean ; and because he knows it, just follow him up and see where the spending of this kind of money leads him to. The end is always the same a wish finally that he had refused the first penny of it that ever came his way. You can't get something for nothing in this old world of ours. There is .a price tag on everything except virtue and honesty; and the graft and easy money that looks...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

jth'ree days from the home of her . aunt, 3545 Ellis ave., returned 'yesterday Refused to tell where she had been, except to say she "had been with friends. The dance of Bindery Women's 'union, local No. 30, held Saturday night at Douglas Park auditor- qa ium, was a huge success, over ury of the union. " , Dog which had bitten two children was beaten to death at N.'Clark and Chicago ave. yesterday Jby C. W. Ellsworth, 147 W. 'Huron street, father of one of the children. "Municipal workshops for the unemployed, municipal kitchens, a farm city, increased wages and hotels for working women," were urged yesterday by Rev. A. Eugene Bartlett. Tony Tantoro, 718 Grand ave., stabbed in face by Tony Bilsoe, 617 Halsted. Tantoro was trying to enter a dance hall at Sangamon street and Grand ave. Police have no clue to ..whereabouts of Violet Buehler, the 15-year-old girl missing since Nov. 25. - Geqrge Libonio found shot to death yesterday morning in vacant lot at rear of 736 Forquer street. Al...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

STRIKERS' PROSPECTS GROWING BRIGHTER Rev. C. H. Doolittle, who has just returned from a trip over the I. C. and Harriman lines as far as Omaha, during which he addressed several meetings of strikers and their sympathizers, said today that the prospects were growing brighter for 'he men in their fight with the roads for recognition of the system federation grandted by tlje Wabash Saturday. "At Freeport," said Rev. Doolittle, "I addressed meetings in the two largest halls there, but even then we had to turn people awa)r. The men were confident, and here, as well as at other points on the line, resembled men on a vacaion, instead of strikers engaged in a grim struggle with a great corporation. . The Ladies Auxiliary to the strikers, which is local to Freeport, ;s a great aid to the men, and their work cannot be commended too highly. As an instance of the regard in which the men are held, and to show that the conduct.of the strike has been quiet and orderly, I addressed the Ministerial ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

. - "" - . THE VERY THING WANTED!" t It is. one of the sacred little white lie.s of life and it is told on1 Christmas morn, in the gray dawn of the morning after the struggle or concrete expression of remembrance ends, perhaps, in the lastminute midnight trio through the looted aisles of the 'denartment fjpjfetore. The receiver smiles to the donor and says: "7 " ' "The very thing I wanted!" - ' i ., Maybe it's true. In many, many cases thanks to the omniscience and pervision of love and thoughtfulness it is true. But if it isn't true? Well, even then let us not blame the little, loving fib that will ie uttered on Christmas morning by millions: -The very thing I wanted!" Not every deviation from truth, let us for this one day persuade .ourselves, is entered upon the Unalterable Records against us. Let us hope that the same thing happen as happened . to "My Uncle Toby's" oath: "'The Accusing Angel flew tip to Heaven's (chancer-y with the qath, and blushed as he gave it in ; and the Re...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 18 December 1911

figgg&SSSL'T; TirL' ":siF5H'rs.i5 v.sBr FULL JURY IN BEEF TRUST, CASE' "BUSTED"" WHEN! STEEL BROKER JURYMAN'SAYS HE LIKES TRUSTS There was a full jury in the ' Beef Trust trial today again for a few minutes. Counsel for the ten millionaire packers tendered a penel of twelve men to the government1 shortly after 11 o'clock. And about five minutes later W. A. Roome, one of the prospective jurors, admitted he had a friendly feeling for trusts arid combinations, and then there were eleven. Roome is a steel broker of Berwyn. After telling of his fondness for trusts, Roome told Special Attorney Sheean, for the' government, that he thought the present trust-busting policy of the government Avas "hurting business," and therefore exceedingly wicked. Sheean challenged Roome for cause. Ju,dge Carpenter overruled the chailenge. Three more times Sheean challenged for cause, and each time Carpenter overruled the challenge, until at last 'Roome said-. flatly that it would take overpower...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 19 December 1911

THE DAY BOOK m 500 SO. BEORIA ST. 398 TEL. MONROE 353 VoL-ljNo. 71 Chicago, Tuesday, Dec. 19, 1911 One Cent CHICAGO'S. TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES Street Car Transportation Controlled in the Interest of . the Big Stores in the Loop District Rather Than for the Benefit of the P.epple Who Ride on Street Cars. Chicago is a great city, but it could and would be greater than it is, if its general growth was not choked by the selfish attitude of Big Business. - r Where is. there another city on-the globe, equal, to .Chicago in population, that tries to confine most, of its business activity to a territory about one mile square. No explanation that actually explains this peculiar situation Has ever been offered the people most interested, the citizens of Chicago who' are entitled to know the reasons, if any exist. The, natural river division of the city logically resulted in the creation of a north, 'south and west side, lake Michigan being-the barrier that made an east side a practical impo...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 19 December 1911

out-lying districts suffered in direct,ratiowith its growth', so-called Jown-town property advancing steadily, in value. Two and threestory buildings gave way to others mo.re pretentious in height, until finally sky-scrapers became necessary to meet the down-town demand, while stores on the north, south and west sides remained empty and rotted in disuse. Capital, always shrewd. a"nd ever thoughtful df self, figured something like this: With street cars from every point of .the compass dumping their passengers in the down-tojvn district, why wouldn't it pay to systemize the general retail trade 11 under one roof, -save the bookkeeping of sixty or seventy small stores and educate the people to do their shopping down-town. To think was to act; department stores were brought into ' heing, and what these big- stores in the loop district have done to the people and small 'business men of Chicago will be told in subsequent issues of The Day Book. AR YdU DISSATISFIED ? Of COURSE. YOU ARC fT...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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