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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

'". Thc Indian Advocatf. 328 Then the red men, twenty or twenty-five of them, in a cos tume even scantier than Adam's after the fall, range them selves upon the straw. They set mummy fashion, their chins on their knees and their arms around their shins, packed so close together that even if they would they could not move. When they are all ready blankets, skins and canvas are thrown over the framework until the tent is almost air-tight, two or three buckets of water are passed in and thrown upon the hot stones and the "medicine sweat" begins. The mo ment the steam begins to rise the Indians begin a chant, which is kept up without interruption until the sweat is over. Packed together, enveloped in steam so thick that none can see his neighbor, the Indians sit, singing and perspiring for an hour or more. Not an Indian moves. He neither can nor wants to. At a signal from the chief or the medicine man, a section of the tent is torn away, and with a heave and a whoop all the bucks make p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

329 The Indian Advocate. fastened to the end of a long stick. The other end of the stick is thrust into the ground at the top of the hill or knoll, and the good Indian has made medicine. Two days seldom pass without the repetition of this ceremony.' It never varies. The scene may change, the Indian may wander to new lands or be driven to them, but where he is there also is his "medi cine sweat" tent and there he "makes medicine." THE MADONNA OF POLAND, The famous Madonna of Czenstochowa is not only the great national Madonna of Poland, but is also held in high veneration by all Slavs. Every year tens and hundreds of thousands of pilgrims make their way from Russia, Galicia, Posen, Silesia, Moravia and Bohemia, as well as from Catho lic Germany, to the shrine. The ancient picture is in honor even in the "Orthodox" Russian Church, and copies of it may be found in many Russian churches, as well as in the Czar's palace. The im perial family of Russia has frequently sent votive offerings...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

Thk Indian AmocA'i i:. 330 r h A I r H I jjTIIC INDIAN ADVOCATE J JVC f i Published bj the Rcnidictinc 1 .ithirs nf .......,..n SACRED HEART MINKTOX. OKLAHOMA. A MdnthU Ksueu UnJer t'n Pntsction of M try. Queen of the Hol Kn.ir, St Mich tel md St Benedict Approedb Rt Re I heo Mcersih tert, Vinr-Apostoln (f OM itionuiind Indinii 1 erntonis TKKMH OP MtTHrnriTION't Single Copies 15c. ' Annual Si. 00 .. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign Si. 25 I ntered is Su n id cl iss M itter it S i red He irt. Okl ihoni 1 k ' 1'Kivii.nor.si 1 I.ir Su'istribcr .md llinif 11 tor will p irtit ip He 11 ill the merits, pricrs md good works nf the Religious of S urcd He irt Ahhe ; , i A solemn Hih M is is sunn eir I iim I rid ij of t'n month in Honor of thiS irrid ; r lit irt. for the intuitions nf Subscribers md Itenif mors " j , A Comentii il M iss is (iffcred cer I irt S iturd i of the month for our dip irted - I'nrnds, Subsinbers md Hincf mors 4 Ter e ir, in tin ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

331 Thh. Indian Advocate. , 1 Let prayer be the key of the morning and the bolt of the evening. - - - Every man's life lies within the present; for thevpast is spent and done with, and the future is uncertain. r&M Pf k It is wonderful how the wisdom of some namby-pamby ( vvk&s jfr Catholic people is so much superior to the wisdom of the Vall Church. According to their philosophy, the Church isn't up -v f ' to date directing the education of youth. The Church would f? s ,g . be in a sorry plight if she depended on them for either virtue '' or brains. sf 5; .- t When the summer of our youth is slowly wasting into the nightfall of age, and the shadow of the past grows deeper, if l as if life were near its close, it is pleasant to look back through U- s the vista of time upon the sorrows and felicities of the years. - Happy indeed are those whose intercourse with the world has i not changed the tone of their holier feelings, or brpken the V ' 4$ musical chords of the heart, whos...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

W"? ," - f & " , vT?Tr Thk Indian Advocatk. 332 tt : $ v jK IS f . 1 A -" , . ) . 1 T y Ir the sun has gone down, look up tothe stars. If the $V earth is dark, keep your eyes on Heaven. With God's pres- C ,' 1ence and God's promise, you may always be cheerful and happy. ' ? A nu.ssr.n thing it is for any man or woman to have a ? ' friend, one human soul whom we can trust utterly, who knows v the beat and worst of us, and who loves us in spite of all our faults: who will speak the honest truth to us while the world flatters us to our face and laughs at us behind our back; who , will give us counsel and reproof in the day of prosperity and self-conceit, but who, again, will comfort and encourage us in ' the day of difficulty and sorrow, when the world leaves us , . alone to fight our battles as we can. - Trtuici: happy are the parents who edify and educate their children after God's will; they shall receive a triple crown for their reward: First, a crown of honor in this life, for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

p-v 333 The Indian Advocaie. virtue to a loose and unstable character. The upright man is. guided by a fixed principle of mind, which determines him to esteem nothing but what is honorable, and to abhor whatever is base or unworthy, in moral conduct. Hence we find him ever the same; at all times the trusty friend, the affectionate relation, the conscientious man of business, the pious wor shiper, the public-spirited citizen. He assumes no borrowed appearance. He seeks no mask to cover him, for he acts no studied part; but he is indeed what he appears to be full of truth, candor and humanity. In all his pursuits he knows no path but the fair and direct one, and would much rather fail of success than attain it by reproachful means. He never shows a smiling countenance while he meditates evil against us in his heart. He never praises us among our friends, and then joins in traducing us among our enemies. We shall never find one part of his character at variance with another. In his man...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

l. -Clrf A t- . i -- 1 The Indian Advocati.. 334 -- - PROGRESS OF CATHOLICITY & & FROM THE TIME OF OUR SAVIOR. 4 A bit of a mathematical problem: How many Catholics will be in the world's census of 2000 A. D.? Here's the rate of progression for nineteen centuries on the authority of a German Protestant statistician: First century 500,000 ' Second century 2,000,000 Third century 5,000,000 Fourth century 10,000,000 Fifth century , 1 5,000,000 Sixth century 20,000,000 Seventh century 25,000,000 Eighth century ( 40,000,000 Ninth century 48,000,000 Tenth century 56,000,000 Eleventh century 70,000,000 Twelfth century 80,000,000 Thirteenth century 85,000,000 Fourteenth century 90,000,000 Fifteenth century : 100,000,000 Sixteenth century r 125,000,000 Seventeenth century 175,000,000 Eighteenth century 250,000,000 Nineteenth century 315,000,000 What a procession of faith! The table shows that in times of great persecution our holy religion has made the most progress. This proves that...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

335 ' The Indian Advocate. t4i.)nm)imt..t t iii.i t m. THE CATHOLIC RELIGION AMONG THE OSAGES. j In June, 1873, the governor, chiefs and counsellors of the Great and Little Osage nations addressed a petition to the President of the United States, in which they asked that their Catholic missionaries and school teachers be restored to them and allowed to again locate in the Osage nation and resume their Christian labors among the Osage people, .in which they had been engaged for many years previous to the late war of the rebellion. Referring to this petition, at a later date, they used the following language: , "In the name of our people, therefore, we beg leave to renew our said petition, and to ask that our former Catholics missionary, Father Shoenmaker, and those connected with him in his missionary and educational labors among our peo ple previous to the late war, be permitted to again locate among us. We think that this request is reasonable and just. "Catholic missionaries have ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

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Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

337 The Indiavn Advocate. so, because, in 1865, when we signed the treaty of that date, the commissioners who made it promised that if we signed it we should again have our missionaries; and we have sought every opportunity to remind our Great Father of his promise, and we hope that he will have it carried out in good faith. Your government is our protector. It asked us to become civilized, and we are endeavoring to take your advice. We are adopting your habits and customs as fast as we can. Your government asked our people to embrace your religion, and we have done so; and in doing so we have chosen the Catholic religion. In doing this we have only followed your example and exercised those privileges which a good God has given us and that no earthly power has a right to take away. "Religion among the whites is a matter of conscience and voluntary choice. It is so among our neighboring tribes and nations in the Indian Territory; it is so throughout all Christ endom; and why should i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

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Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

Y wt M k " c 339 The Indian AdvoCatk. r V. THE SOULS IN PURGATORY. ' p On the 2d of November the Church celebrates a feast which is at the same time most solemn and most touching. This is the commemoration (or remembrance) of the faithful departed. This feast does not concern the souls of all those who have gone before us on this earth. Many are already in the enjoyment of the eternal rest of heaven, and their feast is celebrated the day before, on November ist, the day of All Saints. These are the souls of all those who, when their earthly probation was over, were found in a state of grace at the moment of death, and also of those whose purification from sin in the flames of purgatory is already ended. These holy souls have no further need of our suffrages. They can only receive our homage and our prayers; they have forever entered into joy and into perfect gladness. There are other souls, alas! and in great numbers, with whom this sacred commemoration has no connection: these are ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

.-, - .f Thl Indian "Advocate 340 A i t f & '9 -K, - that is to say, preserved and yet penetrated, and where fy- there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth. " t - , The feast of All Souls relates, therefore, tc the souls in '.' purgatory alone. Purgatory is a state of suffering in which Jv .1 1 , r 1 . .1 r 1 .. . . r mose souis wno were iouna at tne time 01 cieatn in a stare 01 v f ? ' , grace, but who had not sufficiently expiated their sins by re- -,A - pentance, are perfectly purified that they may be worthy to J y' . appear among the saints. i,'. . Purgatory is that formidable future in which we are des"- sc4 tined to pay all that we owe to divine justice. Purgatory pre- sents the darkness and the desolation, the grief and the re- ; PS morse of hell. There is the same terrible fire, there are the "" ' same torments; everything is the same save despair and eter- l nity. The same fire torments the lost souls in hell and the penitent souls in purgatory; and St. Augustine, su...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

34i The Indian Advocate. the creatures who love Him, ahd whom He Himself loves, so terrible a punishment 1 But the greatest suffering of the souls in purgatory lies in their separation from God, from Jesus, their much-beloved Savior. Here on earth the desire and love of the sup'reme good, the aspiration of the soul to God, its only, last and in finitely lovely end, are incessantly weakened, counteracted, and sometimes even extinguished by the cares of life; but after death the Christian soul, plunged into purgatory, disengaged from the body, disentangled from all creatures which obscured its vision, aspires to God alone, desiring nothing beyond the one immeasurable good, now become the soFe object of its love. It has only one impulse, and tends alone to God. But, by reason of the lingering stains of sin, this unhappy soul, repulsed from the sole object of its love, still languishes in grief and desolation. It is assured that it will one day possess this infinite good which it desire...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

The Indian Advocatl. 342 I PARENTS AND MIXED MARRIAGES. j X y j ; Nothing is so disgusting as to hear a young Catholic girl ffr ' or boy advocate the no-harmness, so to speak, of mixed mar riages. It is the fault of parents. It would be better if parents gave more thought to the matrimonial prospects of their children. Unhappy marriages are the commonest things that help to make the world miserable, and these are in a great part due to the carelessness of parents, and to our chaotic social system. No attempt is made to keep young men from frequenting the society of young women of an opposite belief, and when an acquaintance ripens into a mar riage your Catholic parents demand of Heaven why they are so afflicted. When young people are in that state of senti mental feelipg that culminates in marriage, it is rather late to urge religious scruples. He will promise anything, and so will she. Love makes everything rose-colored, and religion, if it casts a shade on the youthful pair, is li...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

ilrjmni ,m 343 Thi: Indian Adocate. amazed at the result! The Irish and French systems of ar ranging marriages systems in which the parents were not without influence cannot be recommended in America with out exciting much disapproval, for public opinion is settled on the subject of "love;" but these systems, faulty as they may be, never caused so much unhappiness as the careless ness of the parents of to-day in relation to the most import ant step in life. rMcMcmrM A VOTIVE CHAPEL BY THE DANUBE. t In the valley of the Danube, upon a wooded plateau guarded by encircling heights, where beetling crags peep out at intervals from the dark pine woods, stands the Abbey of Beuron, with the houses of the little town which has assumed its name nestling under shelter of its far-stretching walls. It is the Mother House of a large and important Benedictine congregation whose branches stretch southwards to Austria, northwards to the Rhine country and Belgium, and across the seas to England, for ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

Tnh Indian Advocath. 344 in sheltered seclusion, the visitor lights upon a quaint little Tyrolese house, with wide, overhanging roof and wooden bal conies to its upper story; around it are grouped numerous farm-buildings. As one approaches nearer, it is evident that this is no ordinary farm-house, for under the shelter of its y, spreading eaves runs a wide band of fresco in which grrceful ff' figures are depicted in subdued tones of color, and in various V points of 'the surrounding buildings appear appropriate quo tations from Holy Scripture in decorative form. From the figures in monastic garb busily at work in the fields hard by, .s v ' it is easy to understand that the establishment is in connection i " with the Abbey. It is, in fact, a grange in which reside a )X " " number of the lay-brothers under the charge of one or more of the priests; from it they go out to till the surrounding land and within its buildings they take charge of a good number of the cows and other animals b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

345 - The Indian Adocati:. became acquainted with the late Archabbot Wolter, the founder of Beuron, and at his hands she received what is known in the Benedictine Order as the "Blessing of St. Mau- rus." This is a special benediction, proper to the Order, in which, in imitation of the devotion of St. Maurus to the relic of the True Cross given to him by St. Benedict and his cus tom of blessing sick persons with it and thereby obtaining many miraculous cures, a portion of the Sacred Wood is still used in the same way and the prayers of St. Benedict and of St. Maurus, one of the holiest of his first disciples, are in voked to obtain the client's restoration to health. In the case of the Princess the benediction was efficacious, and as one of the lasting memorials of her gratitude to the saint in question she caused a chapel to be erected in his honor. The little building now known as the grange was at that time used as a summer residence, whence the Princess was able to attend the ser...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

Thk Indian Advocate. 346 notable monks, and those on the other, distinguished female members of the Order, each symbolical of some monastic vir tue. St. Ildephonsus, the great Archbishop of Toledo, stauds for Faith; St. Meinrad, the martyr of Einsiedeln, for Forti tude; St. Odilo, Love; B. Herman Contractus, Patience; St. Anselm, Zeal; St. Gertrude of Nivelles, Humility; St. Cune gunde, Chastity; B. Ida of Louvain, Devotion; St. Frances of Rome, Obedience; St. Lioba, Prudence. Massive square shaped pilasters, corresponding with the two pillars of the portico, flank the frescoed wall. On each of the side walls of the outside of the chapel, under the broad eaves, is a deep band of fresco painting in subdued tints of gray and brownish green, portraying events in the life of St. Maurus, similar to the decorations upon the walls of the Grange. The interior is so cleverly lighted by a few small side windows that while the general effect is one of subdued tone, the great painting over the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

347 The Indian Advocate. in the repose of death. It is a calm figure clothed in the garb of a monk. On the opposite wall, over the doorway, is a fresco depicting the circumstances which attended his peace ful end. Such is the lovely little sanctuary which the devotion of Princess Catherine of Hohenzollern raised in this secluded vale. Day by day the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is offered on its altar, and many times a day it is visited by passing way farers whose piety is warmed and faith strengthened by the soul-stirring pictures with which monastic artists have adorned its walls. For the architect, sculptor, painters and workmen were all members of the Abbey of Beuron, and their director and leader, with many others of their number, still devote their talents to the portrayal of the like sacred subjects for the edification of the faithful who are privileged to come with in the influence of their works of art. Numerous as are the churches and monasteries which contain examples of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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