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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

10 The Biggest Curse to the Dairyman. The biggest curse on earth, in a dairy section, I believe to be the scrub bull. Even men of intelli gence will use a scrub bull in the herd, and hope to raise calves that will make good cows. I have known men to be so foolish as to take a cow that was capable of giving 7,000 pounds of milk, that tested 5 per cent butter fat, four miles to a scrub bull, when a first-class, pure-bred Guernsey, of high merit, was within a half mile. The reason was the Guernsey's price was $2, the scrub $1. I know of one man foolish enough to buy a Poll Angus bull to cross a large milking herd of grade cows to im prove the milk yield. Now these are no exceptions. My neighbors are just as good and intelligent a class of people as can be found anywhere. They are no exception to what we find all over the land. The facts are, while the dairymen, one and all, have a good deal of hard work to do, the profits have been good until recently, and their thoughts have not been ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

*y*he poultry arc** M. SHIPLEY ..... EDITOR. ——^ i . Killing Chicken Lice. A subscriber asks: What is a good, economical preparation to destroy chicken lice? : . - Answer by Prof. Balmer: Lard (just common, everyday lard) rubbed under the wings once a week is a very good remedy. At the same time keep the perches well coal oiled. I. am reliably informed there is a breed of fowls in Florida with only one feather, and that one is where the tail used to be. This, it seems to me, offers a solution to the vexed lice question. But then we cannot all live in Flor ida. Snohomish, Wash., Sept., 16, 1898. S. M. Shipley, Poultry Editor Ranch and Range: Please state in Ranch and Range if water boiled on tobacco stems will kill lice if sprayed in chicken house SUBSCRIBER. Answer: A tobacco solution will make matters very disagreeable for lice, but it his not strength sufficient to be as effective as other preparations less expensive and more easily made. The article in Last number by H. A. March,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

12 "The Yakima Indian" By Maud Muller. The day was nearing its end as a rider drew rein alongside a small cabin by the Yakima river. He pondered on the immense possibilities of the valley through which he had been riding all day. If only the waters which were now running to waste could be turned on that arid land, what a paradise it would make. He could see it even now in his imagination —the green fields, the browsing cattle, the small, cozy houses and the large barns. Ah, yes; that would all come afterward, but first there were the Indians—the Indians which he had come West to civilize. How different it would be in the future! Now the Noble Red Man spent his days in idleness, the monotony being broken by an occasional hunting or fishing trip, the squaws doing all the work, cutting the wood, carrying the water and feeding the cayuse. What a difference, he says, will education and civilization bring about among these now worthless members of society when they have hitched their poni...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

HARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell- Ing at in round lota: fIo p S _A good many hops are being bought nowadays at good prices. Mr. Settler, of Phil Nels Co.. of Seaittle, has iuiuffht at least 600 bales and Klaber of Tacoma 1,000 bales. The price is said to have been ll@l2c. We know personally of one case where 12% c were offered for a lirst class' hop. Fred Brooks of Black Dia mond called at our office last week. He lnd the hops from 10 acres for sale, and he waa offered the above price, 12% c. ADPles have taken a firmer stand In onotation. California and Oregon stock in market is quite short, owing to the stringent rulings of Fruit Inspector Urown California shippersi are not tak ine chances in sending apples to this mar ket for fear that they would not pass in- BDectlon. It is very unfortunate, though none the less true, that apples from. Cali fornia are badly affected with codling moth and San Jose scale, and for a long time Seattle was considered a ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

14 Water Overflowing. Fifty or more farmers from the White river val ley attended a meeting of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce on September 28 and the city council in the evening to present their claims in regard to the proposed diversion of the waters of Stuck river again into White river. The White river valley is now free from inundations from which it has suf fered for years owing to the falling of a huge bluff at the forks of the White and Stuck riers, which turned the course of the stream. The protest of the farmers against the removal of this natural ob struction, as proposed by Pierce county and the Northern Pacific, was indorsed by the Chamber of Commerce and the city council. James Hart, of Christopher, submitted in the chamber a detailed statement of the facts in the case, and he was supported by a number of speak ers, among them being Morgan Carkeek, A. T. Van de Vanter, John Wooding, T. M. Alvood, B. R. Maddox, William Cochrane, T. W. Prosch and County Commissioner T. R...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

Pacific ■ Jacob Hettrick, . j I Local and district agents C\f\ €\ &T —^s^B^^ wanted on all parts of the V^ vFCIj^ «BE Pacific Coast. yelm, wn. A Jjj A la a Cream Separator a paying Invest y% A»A d~*^.T 111 H ment-? -If you keep cows, what is your ob /-% \F IT! I1 1 %^ J iPH Ml Ject In so doing? What system do you -*■ *-^^ *7 \|B , use to cream your milk? What per cent. *—-* m^ W Iftl of the fat In the milk are you able to get _ a m i^t with the present system? What Is the 1 I* .^_^ _ __ ■% cost In time, labor and ware? Do not wait ■ A {V I m W^ /m |B^^ until you see how your neighbor Is going I .£ .11l l^r" 9 j^r to make a separator pay; figure It out .I—^^rJlJl ■<^^—' _^«^^^^^ yourself. Buy an "Eclipse Separator" at M inMf<W Bill once and get your share of Increased prof t^B BP^ Us gained by the use of a separator. All /^«/%n**« dr^.**%.**+•**4-r\+*c iffi A machines guaranteed. Send for list and OrCHm fIHUDHi testimonials. Try our butter molds. 1 and GREEN AND DRIED FRUIT...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 6 October 1898

16 I FAST WORKING _ \ MONEY MAKING;! 9 9 9 9 1 Southwick := -;. ..--I | -: Hay Presses | 9 9 I Absolutely the best in the WORLD. More Southwick Presses sold this year in Oregon than of all f| <§) others combined. ■ ' || 1 Constructed on Correct Principles: I ® Continuous travel. . . . . .... . ® || 40 inch feed opening—Largest made—Gives large capacity. || (g) Press up; Power down <§) || Send for Catalogues, and Testimonials from Users in Oregon and Washington. j| I Mitchell, Lewis & Stiver Co., | ® FIRST AND TAYLOR ST., PORTLAND, OREGON. BRANCHES AT SPOKANE AND SEATTLE. ; ® m / 1 /^ 1 111 ■ CF I I . IN CHOOSING A SCHOOL I ® ® /®s In which to place our sons and daughters for intellectual training, we should inquire into the social and moral instruction and influences of the /©v ■j®[ various institutions before deciding • * "; I THE PATRONS OF I I VASHON COLLEGE 1 (||) Are unanimous in its praise for thorough, practical work in all lines leading to the best type of educated...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

Ranch And Range Jfr 4©' ISSUED EVERY WEEK Ik- Vol. 4, No. 29 I Something for Nothing f 4* A Chance for the Dairyman !£ l; A DeUVAL "BABY" CREAM SEPARATOR. - : - ■•■«p.;^, * "^<* We offer as a premium at the Washington State Fair, at North Yakima, Wash begin- -.. HMKWliil^Ml : *$£* v ning September 26th, 1898, ONE BABY, No. 0, De LAVAL SEPARATOR, capacity 200 lbs Hi M|A|t§, fl i'l ,' '^ ■^fjL of milk per hour, value $65.00, as shown in accompanying illustration—for the highest mt i*Mi™ lill Jjjf *f quality of Farm Butter made on the farm, without the use of a Cream Separator. This is M I W$ j r&ST J-*3U open to EVERY FARMER IN THE STATE 'OF WASHINGTON. 5^P ; _,____—^~l • J -^T We also offer an 8-Bottle Curtis Hand Babcock Tester for the highest quality of Separa- IB l:tl!P 111 ' jjO^ tor Dairy Butter made on a Private Dairy Ranch with the use of a Cream Separator, ' JKjt I liijll «L L* >jf and a 20-Bottle Curtis Babcock Motor Testing Machine for the highest quality of Cream...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

2 THE ANNIE WRIGHT SEniNARY Tacorria, Washington. J^^*!^,^? 8.1^ 6 4 fli 3 Thirteen Teachers, attended this school m the «■ H a Laboratory, Library, last fifteen years. TZtfM^l Gymnasium, Tennis ' * ' jil^wß \m '"' ' tSmtsSt&^MHHfe^^ ■ Court, Steam Heat, -:- -:- v jH" ~i "''SBHEBT '^ B^h. All<l Electrio Lights. It has an income from : ' I iyfHJn^ViiM^giyffuJmMlHiT ri """ "*" an Endowment Fund of kiyjtL- 1 *JL: "a^r 'fwHiflHwil^ JrWyf '"iffffVim'' 1100,01)0, and uses this to HBtfSfiLa« '■ » 1 i»»i 1 <sjiSS^M^ . „ , , "educe its Annual Charges KSiWa Latin French and Ger to $200 for a School Year y^FJI" iZ—tt!' WllllliW^M^l ri"" DU of thirty-seven weeks. B*°^TSflß^wßß^^^^BßKlSßßß&jß??^^Bßßfc^^^^S^S^P^^^^^^S •-"• >■«•■• This is the School you are Looking for to Educate your Daughter. CH RISTMAS - TERM BEG INS • For Full 11-formatloll and New Illustrated Catalogue apply at once to sept. 15, 1898 -:- - : firs. Sarah K. White, Principal. STUDEBAKER WAQONS /^^SltP^^^s sSi^|...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

RANCH AND RANGE. Vol. 4, No. 29 , The Dodders of Clover and Alfalfa. By Prof. C. V. Piper of the Washington Agricultural College. During the past year there has been complaint from all parts of the state regarding the dodder 3 which attack clover and alfalfa. These dodders are strange plants with slender yellow or orange-col ored stems which entwine about other plants and draw their nourishment from them. No less than five different kinds are known to attack clover and alfalfa. Another sort is found on the willow, and still another confines' itself to the plants that grow along the sea shore. Still others attack the flax, the nettle and other plants. All the dodders are annual plants and all are parasites; that is, they live upon other plants, from which they draw their nourishment by means of minute sucker-like organs, which penetrate into the tissues of the host plant. In late summer and fall the dodders produce clusters of minute white flow ers, whose structure reveals the fact t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

4 tangular plats of a definite fraction of an acre, and this is perhaps the best way where it is desired to estimate the product of the several species culti vated. The plats or beds should not be raised above the walks. Walks may be entirely omitted in gar dens devoted to turf culture. If the beds should run in lines or bands, they should extend at right angles to the slope. A more pleasing garden can be obtained by break ing up the rectangular plan to some extent, intro ducing broader or narrower beds, or longer and shorter ones, or occasionally allowing them to take some other shape. In the grass garden at the de partment of agriculture there is upon each side of the greater length a double series of beds or plats designed for the growth of native and cultivated grasses to be allowed to come into flower. Inside of these bands there is a narrow line of plats in which are grown various fodder plants—clovers, vetches, lupines, etc,-—which do not belong to the grass family. Extending...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

Sheep Scab; Its Nature and Treatment. This is the title of a bulletin just issued by the U. S. department of agriculture. It gives some val uable information in regard to this disease, as fol- lows: The disease commonly called sheep scab is the mange, or scabies, of the sheep. It is a contagious skin disease caused by a parasitic mite. This dis ease is one of the oldest known, most prevalent and most injurious maladies which affects this species of animals. It has been well known for centuries, and references to it are found in the ear lier writings, including the Bible, where we find, in Leviticus, xxii:22, the use of scabbed sheep for bidden in the sacrifices. Some think that the mite which causes the disease was known to Aristotle, 322 B. O.J but it appears that Wichmann, writing in 1786, was one of the first authors of modern times to suspect that sheep scab was of the same nature as the scabies of man. Wichmann held the erroneous view, however, that both, diseases were produced...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

(5 Clover and Sour Soils. It very often happens that a failure to secure a good stand of clover is due to too much acidity in the soil, or to what may be called a sour soil. Where green crops have been plowed under for several seasons, this very often happens. Green rye plowed under is apt to make many soils sour. It is almost impossible to make clover catch well on such a soil. The best thing to do is to top-dress it with slaked lime, which has a very beneficial action in correcting the acidity. It certainly does not injure any soil, and it does good sometimes to soils that we least expect would be benefited by it. Owing to the good effect the lime has upon some land, farmers have been led to classify it as a fertilizer. But it is not really a fertilizer. There is nothing in the lime that adds plant food to the soil, but it tends to free from the soil just what the plants need to thrive on. Lime has been applied to soils to nour ish plants where the land did not contain lime neces ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

completely that it does not "rise" perceptibly until the next season. When, however, it has returned, it is stronger than it was before. Itninfnll and Drulnuße. In the preceding discussion we have assumed that all the water falling upon a piece ot ground evapo rated from it, or that none was lost by drainage, l^et us now assume that some of the rain falling upon the soil is lost in the country drainage and note the effect upon the formation of alkali. As the rain passes through the soil it washes the alkali downward; and if the rain at last meets an underground stream of water which connects with the country drainage the alkali is permanently lost to the soil. Some evaporation from the soil surface vill occur in this as in the former cases, but the vyater most heavily charged with alkali will be lost and there will be no harmful accumulation of sol uble salts at the surface. In general, then, we may say that whenever the rainfall is sufficient to con nect with the country drainage t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

8 Ranch and Range IBBCKD KVKRY BATUKDAY. In the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. published BY thk RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. Conducted by - MILLER FREEMAN Assistant EDITOB - H. M. WALLACE, A. B. Editorial Offices, • • Seattle, Wash. BUBINKBB OFFICES: Seattle, - - - 815-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. BUnSCBII'TION, IN ADVANCE, • $1.00 PKB YEAB. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. Enormous quantities of frozen mutton and beef are being shipped from Brisbane, Australia, to Manilla. This is trade which Washington and Ore gon should have. We are gaining a market for our farm products in Hawaii, U. S., and our trade with the Orient is fast increasing. We would like to see in the near future our people have a very large similar trade with the Philippine Islands. We hope and trust the demand across the great waters...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

kane; second on cockerel, first and second pullet, second on pen, Dilworth Bros., Spokane. Partridge Cochins—Everything to A. M. Cale, North Yakima. Black Langshans—First cock, first hen, C. H. Jen nings, Tacoma; first and second pullet, first pen, H. Bolster, Spokane. ! White Leghorns—First and second on cockerel, first and second hen, first and second pullet, first pen, F. A. Johnson. Brown Leghorns —First cock, second cockerel, first and second pen, second pullet, F. A. Johnson, Tacoma; first cockerel, A. H. Wannamaker, Coupe ville; first pullet, Dilworth Bros., Spokane. White-Faced Black Spanish—First cock, first and second cockerel, first and second hen, first and sec ond pullet, first pen, F. A. Johnson, Tacoma. Andalusians —First and second cockerel, first and second pullet, first pen, C. C. Johns, Tacoma. Polish—Goldens (Plain)—C. H. Jennings, Taco ma, everything. Goldens (B. G.), C. H. Jennings, everything. Silvers and W. C. White, C. H. Jen nings. W. C. Blacks—F. A. Johnso...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

10 Another Fruit Pest. The Kansas Experiment Station sends us a press bulletin describing another apple pest which has already done considerable damage in Kansas and Missouri and seems to be spreading slowly. This pest is the Fringed-wing apple-bud moth and apple growers should be on the lookout for signs of its arrival. The following is a brief description of the life history of the insect: The adults appear early in the spring and the females commence to deposit very small yellow eggs singly in the expanding buds and leaves. The eggs are usually deposited at night, and the number laid by one female is esti mated to be about 25. The eggs hatch in about a week. When the larvae or worms first emerge from the eggs they are very small, about one twenty fifth of an inch in length, and are of a light yellow color, with the head of a shining black, and the up per part of the next segment brownish. It is these little caterpillars or worms that do the damage. The larvae begin to feed upon a...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

Too Much Forcing. Meat, red pepper, etc., fed to hens during the winter undoubtedly encourages egg production, but fed in large quantities will debilitate the layers, causing widespread disease and sickly, enfeebeled offspring. One winter I fed corn meal mush, strongly seasoned with red pepper, daily, to 75 hens. They had fairly comfortable quarters —no artificial heat—and the number of eggs they pro duced astonished us all. When April arrived I had 35 chicks; any number of hens sitting; and was looking forward to an enormous crop of broilers. But as the weather grew warmer my hens began to droop and die, almost without warning; laying hens, setting hens, brooding hens —they all died, and the young chickens followed suit. The next winter I had but a beggarly array of six hens in my chicken house—and I did not feed them red pepper. Some years later I experimented with fresh meat, feeding all the hens would eat, and the result was as before. An enormous number of eggs in the winter —a...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

12 More About Cream Thickening. J. H. Moore, of Falls City, called upon us Wednesday. He is the dairyman mentioned in the query regarding sour cream spoken of in our issue. Mr. Moore said that the information given was not'complete and that none of the causes ad vanced by Prof. Spillman was the right one. "Prof. Spillman suggests it possible that the slops may be allowed to run under the floor," said he. "The building was put up this year, and slops are all properly drained out of the building. Every thing is kept scrupulously clean. All utensils are washed in a sink. "Prof. Spillman is laboring under another mis take that we receive milk from other dairymen. We have only our own milk. Neither the fresh milk, cream or separated milk comes in contact with wooden tanks. The milk is run through the separator without being put into a tank, and the cream is run into a tin bucket and after being cooled is set in stone jars to ripen. It stands about 24 hours, and churned in a boned churn, ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 13 October 1898

fIARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is sell ing at in round lota: Plums are lower. Peaches are coming pretty freely. A little more desirable stock is coming than list week. Wenatchee is shipping ex cellent peaches now. Grapes—Yakima Concords are not so P Apples are 40@60c for cooking; 75c@$l for fancy, and a few extra fancy will bring as high as $1.25. Potatoes—The first Yakima stock is be ginning to arrive. Both Gordon & Co. and the California Commission Co. had •i carload on the way here Tuesday. Eastern Concord grapes, 30c per basket. Cantaloupes are $1@1.25 per box; tom.j ioes, 35@75c; plums, 35@50c; egg plant, s@.c l One feature of the market this week is large shipments to Honolulu of fruit and produce; apples and crated onions and potatoes especially being sent. New canned corn and tomatoes are on the market, jobbing at $1 per dozen Peaches are in good demand; 6»c@sl.oo. Creamery butter is jobbing at 26c. Bran is selling at $14 and shorts at $15. Cel...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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