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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Obituary [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Obituary Mrs. Alma J. Simmons, wife of John W. Simmons, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. E. Arbogast on Fri. Apr. 8 1921. Her death was mis to pneumonia contracted aTTew days ptcvious. She vas born Nov. 23 1840 and man led in 1858, her maiden name aoing Vandevender. To this union were born ten children, three of whom died in infancy. She is survived by her aged husband, one brother, Jacob Vandeveuder, and seven chikT’- n, five of whov were with her at her death. These are Mrs. S. E. Arbogast, with whom she lived, Mrs. T. S. Wagner, of Straight Creek, Miss Ida, of Harrison burg, Mrs. F. L. Tracy, of Kewanee, 111., Milliam, of Elkton,- Va,V J. E.„ of Marlliltori ’ W'. Val^hnd 1 &. 17.V r \oi Maryland. 1 ' Thirty •hine 111 gratt'dehil* dren and twenty* eigftt’ grbai; 1 gnb|(£- ! children survive her. She had been a member of the M. E Church South for over forty years and led a life according to its teachings. She was loved by all who knew her and will be missed, no...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
School Fair [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

School Fair The school fairs which have been held in the state for several years have been a great success in arousing an interest in students and schools. This year Highland schools have takn up the plan and to-day, Friday it is to be held at Monterey High School. For the Initial exhibition there is a good display: drawing, penmanship, compositions, needle work, etc. Each year it is possible that the work will broaden in its field of endeavors. A list of winners will be published in next week’s issue. The judges for the written work are: Mrs. H. B. Wood, Mrs. Hiram Simmons and Supt R. E. Mauzy. They are grading and comparing the work at the home of Mrs. Wood Thursday. The winners will be announced at the exhibition at M, H. S. on Friday.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

NOTICE All persons who had land transferr ed while I was Commissioner of the Revenue and have not paid fee for same will do so by the first day of court. All fees not settled then will be turned over to an officer for collection. Save cost, settle now. J. H. Pruitt o HONOR LIST NEW —Bowman Barkley, Elkins, Herman Newman, Covington, Va. RENEWALS—Mrs L. B. Gwin, Monterey Rtl; H. W. Lindamood, Crabbottom; H J. Page, Naples L. T Pope, Huntington, W.* Va.; Mrs. G P McCoy, Neodesha, Kans; J. A. Wagner, Nappanine, Wash. Dan Hiner, Doe Hill; Russell Rexrode, Monterey Route 1. NOTICE The 102 Anniversary Sevices of the Odd-Fellows, will be held at Mon terey on Wed. eve. Apr. 27 at 8 P. M Some prominent speakers will address the people. All Odd-Fellows are requested to be present, also the public is cordially invited. By order, District Deputy

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

SOME PEOPLE HAVE A HARD TIME OE IT Trying to Get Along with low Vitality and Weak Blood Not .Fair .To .Themselves Pepto-Mangan Builds Rich Red Blood and Restores Strength If you. want to succeed in your work—to get to the top, look first to your health. Be physically fit. Keep your blood in good condition. If your blood is bad. you lose enthu siasm. Little things bother you. Instead of concentrating on your work, you drowse. You try to pull yourself together. It takes all your energy to do just average work. Perhaps your blood has beeme clogged with poisons. You are just beginning to feel it. You need the good blood tonic, Pepto-Mangan. It contains ingredients that feed your blood ad purify it. You get more red corpuscles. Then your energy comes back and you eat better, feel better, and look better. It shows in your daily work. You get things done without exhausting yourself. You get back normal—the way you should be. There is but one genuine PeptoMangan and that is “Gude’s”. It is ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

CHURCH SERVICES Monterey Circuit—Sunday, April 24 th. Preaching at Rehobeth 11 a. m.; and at Monterey, 8 p. m Rembert D McNeer Revival services will begin at Green Hill with Rev. J. Herbert Nor ton and wife as evangelists, Apr. 24 at 11 A. M. Preaching at Fairview 3:30 P. M. Geo. W. Thu mm Crabbottom Charge—lst Sunday Cent ral 11 A. M.; New Church, 3 P. M. 2nd Sunday, Union Chapel 11 A. M.; Central 8 P. M. 3rd Sunday New Church 11 A. M.; Central 8 P. M. 4th Sunday Circleville 11 A. M.; Dry Run 3 P. M. Ist quarterly meeting at Central, preaching by P. E. Rev. J.H.Light May Ist 8 P. M. Businos meeting May 2 10 A. M. „V. H. W. Lindimood BUSINESS LOCALS Advertisements under this head at he following rate: 25 words or less 25c each Insertion. Each additional word at one cent per Avoid each inFigures and initials count as words. Cash MUST accompany order. MALE HELP WANTED—Get busy Keep Busy. Is your job safe? Is it per manent? You want a life-long busin ess. You can get into such a busine...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 4 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

In a > new size package LUCKY STRIKE 10 cigarettes for 10 cts Handy and convenient; try them. Dealers now carry both sizes: 10 for 10 cts; 20 for 20 cts. ll% Toasted lOC lOE 20E=a0»~ socaox: Tiff MAN WHO SAVES The man who spends less than he ecuns has learned the way to independence and success. No matter what his income may be he knows that he can arrange to live within it and save some surplus for his growing bank account. When money is put aside regularly it grows with really surprising speed. This lank helps thrifty people to save by paying four per cent interest on savings accounts, subject to usual regulation. Teach your dollars to have mere cents THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK Monterey, Va. Oldest —Largest— Strongest u t Kill That Cold With • FOR AND Colds, Coughs La f» r lpP e uina Neglected Colds are Dangerous 1 1 Take n© chances. Keep this standard remedy handy for the first sneeze. '* !!l :, T Breaks up a cold in 24 hours Relieves !,i *atunh*. <lll Grippe,i...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
A BIT TIMID SINCE THE LAST PLUNGE [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

A BIT TIMID SINCE THE LAST PLUNGE

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“PILGRIMS” ALL YOUNG MEN Though We Are In the Habit of Speaking of Them as “Fathers," They Were Youthful. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

“PILGRIMS” ALL YOUNG MEN Though We Are In the Habit of Speaking of Them as “Fathers," They Were Youthful. Among the contributions to the literature of the tercentennial of the landing of the “Pilgrim Fathers'” is a paper by Sir Arthur E. Shipley, master of Christ’s college, Cambridge, and vice chancellor of the university. In an editorial note introducing his article in the New York Times it is stated that he is well known as a zoologist, but why that qualifies him to write learnedly about our Pilgrim ancestors, who never heard of Darwin or his evolution theory, is unrevealed in the ne. We take it that the alleged others” never claimed kinship with •*e anthropoids and that they looked uch higher for information about ■ eir origin than to a noted zoologist. But, be that us it may, Sir Arthur does inject a new thought, while not telling us much else that is new about those valiant and earnest souls who embarked on the tiny Mayflower—tiny in our eyes now, but not so considered by them ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Preventing Loss of Identity. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Preventing Loss of Identity. All parents are being urged to have their children’s finger-prints taken, so that in case of disappearance from home their whereabouts can be more easily ascertained than with a meager description. The police department of any city would be glad, with this idea in view, to make and file the fingerprints. Argentina is far in advance In this matter. In that country the fingerprints of every individual are taken and filed away for possible future reference. Every now and then one hears of a case where somebody has forgotten all about himself, and does not know who he is or where he belongs. This affliction, fortunately rare, is called ‘‘aphasia.” If the fingerprints of such an unlucky Individual ■" ere on file somewhere, the task of •entifying him might be greatly simtud. Fingerprints taken in babyod do not alter their pattern through e. Every day the War and Navy partments are called upon to locate ung men who are missing from their homes. With only the na...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
WORK OF ITALIAN ARTISTS Men of Genius Engaged to Decorate the Capitol in the City of Washington. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

WORK OF ITALIAN ARTISTS Men of Genius Engaged to Decorate the Capitol in the City of Washington. Most of the decorations in tlie capital at Washington are the work of Italian artists, according to an article by Professor Enrico Sartorio, in an Italian magazine published in New York. The dome was decorated by a young Italian painter, Piert’o Bonani, who had previously worked in Rome and Carrara, and who died in 1819, shortly after the completion of his work in Washington. The cast of the statue of liberty was done by Causicl, who died before he could put it Into marble, and the spread eagle under the statue was carved by another Italian, Yalapertl. As the hall of representatives neared completion In 180G Giuseppe Frauzonl and Giovanui Andrei, sculptors, were brought over from Italy. The former was skilled in figures and the latter in decorative sculpture, but their work was destroyed when the capital was burned by the British during the War of 1812. When work was resumed, Andrei was ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
James Fenlmore Cooper. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

James Fenlmore Cooper. James Fenimore Cooper, the first American novelist to gain a reputation in Europe, studied at Yale, but he was not a close student and in his third year was asked to leave the college. He then joined the navy, where he gained knowledge and experience that he later used to make his sea tales realistic. He married and retired from the navy just before the War of 1812, engaging in farming. One day, while reading aloud an English novel, he boasted to his wife than he could write a better novel than many of those appearing at that time. So he produced “Precaution,” a commonplace story of English high life, of which Cooper knew nothing. Advised to turn to adventure in his own country, he wrote “The Spy” In 1821 and published it at his own expense. On Its appearance he was at once recognized as a novelist of force. In the twenty years that followed he brought out many novels, Including those stirring sea tales, “The Pilot” and “The Red Rover.” Among his more popular ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Twenty Years in Forestry. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Twenty Years in Forestry. The Tale forest school has just celebrated Its second decennial reunion and the twentieth anniversary of its founding, says the American Forestry Magazine. Over one hundred alumni and students, or approximately 20 per cent of those who have received professional Instruction at the school attended the reunion. Of the twelve leading forest schools ten are under the direction of Yale men, and eleven have Yale graduates In their faculties. In addition, forestry is taught as a subject at four other institutions by Yale graduates. In all, 43 men from this institution are engaged in training professional foresters in America.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
KEEPING UP HISTORIC HOMES New England Societies Doing Good Service in Saving Famous Buildings for Posterity. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

KEEPING UP HISTORIC HOMES New England Societies Doing Good Service in Saving Famous Buildings for Posterity. The Swampscott (Mass.) Historical society has undertaken the happy enterprise of trying to save for posterity the John Humphrey house, which, as nearly as can be determined, has been standing In that town near the shores of Massachusetts bay for 284 years. If the date of Its building can be fixed as of the year 1637 — some students believe It dates from 1634—then the John Humphrey house will be recognized as the oldest In New* England, antedating the Fairbanks house in Dedham by one year. The Historical society has had the title traced and a copy of an old map made from the original in the British museum. These go to show the structure it proposes to buy and preserve is the one dwelt In by Humphrey, who was assistant to Governor Winthrop. Some doubt has been expressed as to whether the building Is the original house, a question having been raised as to the probability of fire...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Value of Peat Underestimated. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Value of Peat Underestimated. The great continental ice sheet, invading North America, left thousands of lakes In its path, sprinkled over the northern states from Minnesota to Maine. In Minnesota alone there are 10,000 lakes and more, which are helping to make the North a great summer playground. But the interrupted drainage of the glaciated region gave these states another priceless asset, Earl Christmas writes in the Dearborn Independent. When great fields of ice covered the ground thousands of years ago nature was providing, by a curious paradox, a way for future generations to keep warm. Peat, deposited in these lakes and marshes In quantities sufficient to make billions of tons of fuel, has been the beneficent gift of the ice sheet to Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, New York and the New England states. In the peat bogs, scattered over nine states and parts of a dozen others, there lies one of the great undeveloped resources of the nation, now beginning to attract serious atten...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Developing the Philippines. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Developing the Philippines. Development of Philippine natural resources and the manufacturing and industrial plants has hardly started. Capital and workers are needed and the markets for both are tight. About one-third of the total area of the Islands is covered with timber. Practically all of this is owned by the government, which grants concessions for timber cutting and sawmills. There are about fifty sawmills, most of them small. Red and white lauan, the trees 200 feet high, are the principal wood of commercial value. The red is used as a substitute for mahogany. Apltong and guijo are the next timbers in value. Woods for varnishes, paper pulp, perfumery, essential oils, dyes, tanning and medicinal purposes grow wild, but little has been done to make them commercially valuable.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Thread Records. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Thread Records. A Swiss Inventor has devised a gramophone which plays thread records instead of the modern hard rubber ones. In his machine a thousand yards of thread, enough to fill a small spool, may be played, giving more music than the largest hard rubber record made today. The thread Is ordinary thread treated with a coat of a specially prepared composition that is very sensitive to sound when it becomes hard. It is not affected by temperature, nor does it require any special care. Thus it is both Inexpensive and durable.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
IN THOSE “GOOD OLD TIMES” Fine to Read About, but Few of Ua Would Care to Go Back to Their Conditions, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

IN THOSE “GOOD OLD TIMES” Fine to Read About, but Few of Ua Would Care to Go Back to Their Conditions, There Is no question that breakfast Is today a meal that has been developed out of the centuries, remarks J. H. S. In the Christian Sciencq Monitor. In the days of the Wars of the Roses, breakfast was eaten when we of today are still asleep. Into the cold and stuffy hall, rush strewn, with a fire feverishly burning on the great hearth, came the men, yawning and pushing their tousled hair out of their eyes. They would not wear their swords, unless there was to be an Immediate foray or battle or rouse of some kind or other, but all would have their knives and daggers, to eat with and to stab, if need be. There was no sunlight and the smoky mist of the fens came in at the doors and through the high, loose windows. The dogs yawned, too, and scratched themselves, too, and made themselves generally obnoxious as those noble animals will. At the high table, on his dais, the lord’s platter ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Daring Equilibrists. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Daring Equilibrists. The Frenchman who recently waved the tri-color from the top of the Strassburg cathedral In celebration of the transfer of the custody of that famous pile from German to French authority, was not the first to perform this daring feat. The spire is 466 feet from the ground, and is surmounted by a “button” 18 inches In diameter, which formerly was a pedestal for a statue of the Virgin, but now serves merely as a support for a lightning rod. In the Eighteenth century, according to the chronicles of the cathedral, a German chimney sweep climbed up to the button and there stood upright on it. Moreover, at that time there was no lightning rod running up the side to aid in the ascent. In April, 1860, again, a French soldier, to win a bet, climbed the spire and actually stood on his head on the button. A strong wind was blowing, and the man swayed this way and that with his legs in the air in a truly alarming manner. His form, it Is related, seen from the ground, looked ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Big Game Drive. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 22 April 1921

Big Game Drive. An extraordinary amount of game has been exterminated in Zululand as a result of the great drive carried out at the request of the government with the object of striking at the devastating disease known as nagana, which has played havoc with stock all over the country. Men from all parts of Natal took part In the expedition, the number of guns being estimated at 700. Men of the young farmer type predominated, but there was a rich sprinkling of the “old hands,” and all were thoroughly equipped. The drive created a volume of protest, the S. P. C. A. and other bodies putting forward strong objections, all of which, however, were overruled.—Nairobi Farmers’ Journal.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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