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Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 204,118 items from Windsor And Richmond Gazette, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Treatment for Diphtheria. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Treatment for Diphtheria. Take equal quantities (say two table spoonfuls) of turpentine and liquid tar; r

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

/%/V ?«/v » B. BOARD A1TD COMPA1TT We are often asked the question : How is it I can buy my Drapery and Clothing lrom you so much cheaper than at any other house? You must sell with very small ?r° Our reply is so simple, that none can fail to see its force : We buy for cash, and cash only, thus we save oar discount, and this is our profit; sotlmtour customers ^ are buying fetail from us at pfofij^ venNntfar'lh'e COST PRICEEoHhose who have to buy for credit . Another question arise! from this answer: How can you buy for prcftnpt cash more than the other houses in town? Now comes the real secret, told m a few' words : WE SELL FOR CASH, cash down-no exception. What does this mean ? It means no books kepi, no baJ debts. More thon this ; It means that our customers pay-only for what they -they have not to payexlra for-ihose who^jon't pay. These are the reasons why we are kept busy, while on every hand we hear the cry of BAD TIMES ! NO BUSINESS ! Below we give a few quotations of some Spe...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

COMMERCIAL HOTEL, Corner pttlp^G-ipps and Riley Streets, >SU1^R^HILLS, leservoir. JAMES CULL, (Late of Windsor), PROPRIETOR. NONE but the Best Brands of Wine, Ale and Spirits kept in stock. Good Accom modation and charges moderate. Kurraj ong. Kurrajong. DAILY COACHES to the above on arrival of 9 train from Sydney. Picnic Parties arranged for on the Shortest Notice. c. HOUGHTON", COACH PROPRIETOR, RICHMOND.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Politics in Courtship. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Politics in Courtship. Young Charlie said to his sweet M'lisa When he his declaration ended, ' I now must try to steal a kL«,s, . And hope you .will not be offended,' ' What! steal a kiss! just try it, do !' ' She answered him with animation; ' And if you get it, I'll pursue A policy of retaliation !' -Boston Courier.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MR. WILLOUGHBY AT RICHMOND. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

MR. WILLOUGHBY AT RICHMOND. Mr. J. P. Wiiloughby, Protectionist candidate for the Hawkesbury, spoke from Mr. G. Cobcroft's balcony, at Richmond, to a crowd of about 400 on Tuesday evening. He received a very fair re ception, Mr. H. Cobcroft being in the chair. Mr. Wiiloughby said this was the third time he had spoken in the electorate, and each time he had been received with every consideration ant4 courtesy. It was the boast of the English people that they always gave fair play, and this accounted in no small measure for their greatness. He had been told that that part of the district was a stronghold of hreetrade, but he had not found it so. He stood on the Protectionist platlorm, and he, believing that the cause was right, endeavoured to promulgate its doctrines. Protection should be the Cause of this colony, as it had been the Cause of England. This colony scarcely knew its strength, and its future could only be guaged by America. 100 years ago, America, which now had 00 million...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Windsor Police Court. FRIDAY. (Before Messrs. Becke, P.M., Conlon, Dunstan, and J. B. Johnstone) INSUTING BEHAVIOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Windsor Police Court. FRIDAY. (Before Messrs. Becke, P.M., Conlon, Dunstan, and J. B. Johnstone ) INSL/TING BEHAVIOUR. Mrs. Lamond v. W. O'Brien, charged with " poking a lunar." Fined 5s and costs. CARRIAGE LICENSE. A carriage license was granted to - Leet.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LITTLE FOLK. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

LITTLE FOLK. Johnny was the son of a paragraphia^ and when he saw his mother's siBter, of un certain age, freshening up her appearance by rougeing her'cheeks he said. ' Aunt Jennie, your decorating an antique mug, ain't you ?' -j Took the Risk-A little girl wanted mora buttered toast, and was told that she had had enough, and that more toast, would certainly make her ill. ' Well,' said 6he, ' give me anuzzer piece and send for the doctor right away A Cincinnati boy gave the following de scription of having a tooth polled; ' Just be fore it killed me the tooth came out.' The kind-hearted farmer was showing the newly hatched chickens to*the children. Ab they were admiring the downy, little things, a tiny little fellow from the city *epoke up, ' Mr* Miller, when you going te set your horse ?' ' Mamma,' said little Mabel, who had just come home from church, ' what made that man in the corner say ' Amen ' so often, while the preacher was talking P' ' I know,' said Willie confidently. ' W...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
French Mustard. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

French Mustard. The finest of the Freach brands of mustard is known as (Le Normande's Moutarde a la Ravigotte,' and is made as follows : Take parsley, cervil, chives, celery and tarragon of each ounce ; ground cloves, garlic thyme, of each four drachms ; ground together and add four ounces of .salt; macerate the whole in two quarts of the beBt white wine vinegar, stirring well at least twice every day. At the expira tion of fifteen days strain through a coarse cloth and set aside, Take one pound of the finest .flour of mustard, made by grinding dried black mustard, and bolting through a fine sieve, and Tub it up with four ounceB of olive oil, gradually adding the vinegar ob tained by maceration, and thoroughly mixing as you go. When nearly finished add enough sugar to give a slightly sweetish taste. Whfen finished pour into terrines or earthen pots and corktightly. The French manufacturers usual thrust a red-hot poker or bit of iron down the centre of each pot, and quickly withdraw ...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT WE HEAR. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

WHAT WE HEAR. That the proceedings on nomination day both in Windsor and Richmond were very lively. That a certain candidate remarked that it was said he had no stake in the Borough, but he found that those who had a stake generally got a lot of money expended in the locality where it was situated. That at Richmond Mr. Willoughby advised his hearers not to drink colonial beer. " All right," said a man in the crowd; " we'll have some Foster." " You ought to be careful, as Parkes might enter an action against you and take the old horse," shouted a man oh Tuesday night, after Mr. Willoughby had been referring to some action of Sir Henry's. That Mr. Harry M'Quade was in town this week. That the trustees of Wilberforce Common are not afraid of the action taken against them by their opponents. They in the first place require it to be proved that there are any encroachments on the Common at all, and if it is so, want to know what harm is being done by the poor people there. That the Taylor...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ART & LITERATURE [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

ART & LITERATURE The British public is declared to have an inexhaustible thirst at the present time for books on political economy. Witlln six months 158,000 copies of the shilling volumes of Carlyle's works have been sold by the London publishers. Prince Eugene of Sweden and Norway has resumed his painting lessons in Paris. He lias his visiting cards engraved with the words * Eugene Bernadotte.' A well-know Englishwoman has come to the conclusion that the work of Byron,Shelley and Keats are not sufficiently studied by her own sex, and she has set apart a considerable sum of money, producing a substantial in come that is to be devoted to prizes for essays on the works of those poets. Trustees have been appointed to administer this fund.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Literary Immortality. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Literary Immortality. Professor Seely discusses the question of literary immortality. He shows that the chances of any man's work becoming a per manent classic is greatly reduced. Inferior Latin and Greek authors live, owing to excep tional causes. The choas of Europe, after the -Latin classics were written, put out and prevented all literary production for a thou sand years. This made of them monuments of a lapsed civilization. They were greedly caught , up, as one catches a lost thread in a labyrinth. Ever since the' Revival of Learn ing ' they have held their place in our schoole. But the immortality of Ovid and Horace is waning. Seely allows the probability of two or three immortals in a century-as ?Goethe and Hugo for our own. The rest must be content to be evanescent. * However much I may admire Gaorge Eliot, I cannot imagine that a hundred years hence people will fiud time to read 'Middlemarc. ' But Tennyson, the pofessor thinks, may be read in pad;.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Why don't God kill the Devil? A BOY'S QUESTION AND A MAN'S ANSWER. I. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Why don't God kill the DevilP A BOY'S QUESTION AND A MAN'S ANSWER. I. " Wliy don't God kill the Devil ?" her dear boy Once asked his dear Mama. Mama didn't know, But hemmed and said : you're young, my boy, J and so I'll tell you, when you're bigger grown, my boy. My boy he had a curious-puzzling brain, More metaphysical much than his Mama. And thought there's no one wiser than Papa; If I try him, I shall not try in vain. " Papa, why don't God kill the Devil ?"-a queer Question to ask, but, if you needs must know, I'll do what best I can to make it clear ; God spares to give the flend the mortal blow For this wise cause, that you may have the joy, To kill him for yourself, some day, my boy. II. But what's he like, Papa, this Prince of Hell, That I may know him when I cross his figure ? Has horn and tail ? of brimstone does he smell And has a skin like any Africk nigger ? Ob, he has many shapes, statesman or priest To prop a crazy throne, or hurl a ban ; Where big-wigs gather he is no...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Windsor District Court. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Windsor District Court. The District Court opened on Wednesday, before his Honor Judge Dowling. The solicitors in attendance were Messrs. Walker, Neilson, and H. Richardson. A- number of undefended causes were dealt with. Following arc the defended causes : - J. 1'. YVilloughby v. J. Holden, claim for £17 6s (3d, for dental work. Mr. Richardson for the defence. Verdict for plaintiff for /12 12s. F. Huxley v. John Gough, for recovery of £10, stake deposited with defendant in respect of a boat race arranged between John Ford and Her bert Atkins. Mr. Richardson for defendant. It will bo remembered that some time ago a match was made between Ford and Atkins, and _£io were deposited by each party. Ford objected to the boat which Atkins intended to use, and re fused to row under the circumstances. Mr. Gough was stakeholder, and he handed the money which had been planked over to Atkins. Plaintiff, Huxley, gave evidence, and the articles in con nection with the race were produced, Huxley's ...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Dental Notice. VISITS'Windsor cm the LAST MONDAY OK EACH and remains for ONE Wehk. CONSULTING ROOM: "THE COTTAGE,' RO\*AL HOTEL. Messages left at the Royal Hotel, or Mr. Dick's, opposite. E> R. SPEER'S AMERICAN DISPENSARY, 42 MARGARET-STH$ET, (Bet ween ^eoiy^Sand Y«rk SJ P.O liox, 9201^, S^DNE'i/ PV- i3o> Established for the yient fic and Speedy Cure of CHRONIC, SPECIAL, AND NERVOUS DISEASES. AS a test, Dr. Speer will send a trial bottle of his Medicine free of charge (carriage ex cepted) to any person applying to him, who will give full particulars of their trouble. This will demonstrate his unbounded confidence in these wonderful remedies, which are only known to him self, and which for over two years have achieved such unvaried success in his New Zealand practice. All applicants for a trial bottle Of his medicine must enclose a 2d stamp for reply. BOUSE HILL AM) RIVBftSTONE; /MAJfT Si l - V-t ALIC r. N <?E IT yoe L A B L^S^Jeat&es JRO U SEJ HILL daily,/un...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Treatment for Diphtheria. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Treatment for Diphtheria. Take equal quantities (say two table- | spoonfuls) of turpentine and liquid tar; * > T'T '' 1 ^ ....... ' * * put tjiem in a tin^panror cup,, and set^fire tcu the dsiix^ure, taking, 4are to have a ; larger p*an uiader^t as^k safe^imrd against " fife. K tlefose resinbiis smoke arises making the room dark. The patient immediately seems to experience relief; the choking and the rattle stop; the patient falls into a slumber and seems to inhale the smoke with . pleasurethe fibrinous membrane soon becomes des patched; and the patient coughs, up microbes. These, when caught in the glass, may be seen to dissolve in the smoke. In the course of three days a patient entirely recovers. Having in view the prevalance in the colonv of the above deadly maladj', I thought you might consider it worth while in the interests of humanity to make it public. Yours truly, JOHN BROADBENT, Medical Herbalist.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Told by the Teeth. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Told by the Teeth The shape and placing of the teeth are not without significance in the character given by the mouth. When the upper gums show above the teeth directly the lips are opened, it is a sign of a cold and phlegmatic nature. Short small teeth are held by the phys , life, while ratlior long teeth, if ovenly set in the head, denote long life. The more the toeth in point, size, shape and arrangement approach to those oi the carnivorous animals, the more violent are the animal instincts in the person: while the more human teeth in shape the poaition approach to those of the graminivorous animals, the more placid is the character. White medium-size and evenly set teeth, which are soon as soon as tho mouth is open, but which are entirely exposed-that is which do not at any time 6how the gum-are a sign of good and honest natures. Projecting teeth show rapacity: small, retroating teeth, which are rarely seen unless in laughter, show weakness and want of physical and moral courage...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How to Go to Sleep. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

How to Go to Sleep. It is now, I believe, writes a correspondent of the London Speetator, generally accepted that our conscious, daylight thinking pro cesses are carried on in the sinister half of our grain-i. e., in the lobe which controls the action of the righ't arm and the leg. Pon dering on the use of the dexter half of the brain-possibly in all unconscious celebra tion, and whatsoever maybe genuine of the mysteriss of planchette and spirit-rapping, I came to the conclusion (shared, no doubt, by many other better-qualified inquirers) that we dream with this lobe, and that the fantastic, unmoral spirit-like character of dreams is, in some way, traceable to that fact. The practical inference then Btruck me : To bring back sleep when lost, we must quiet the conscious, thinking, sin ister side of our brains, and bring into ac tivity only the dream side, the dexter lobe. To do this the only plan I could devise was to compel n.yjelf to put aside every waking thought, even soothing an...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Wholesome Stimulants—The Medical Record. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Wholesome Stimulants-The Medical Record. Milk heated too much above 100 degrees Fahrenheit loses for a time a degree of its sweetness and density. No one who, fatigued by over-exertion of body or mind, has ever experienced the reviving influence of a tumbler of this beverage, heated as hot as it can be sipped, will willingly forego a resort to it because of its being rendered somewhat less acceptable to the palate. The promptness with which its cordial influence is folt is indeed surprising. Some portions of it seem to be digested and appropriated al most immediately, and many who now fancy that they need alcoholic stimulants when ex hausted by fatigue will find in this simple draught an equivalent that will be abun dantly satisfying and far more enduring in its effects. ' There is many an ignorant, over-worked woman who fancies she could not keep up without her beer ; she mis takes its momentary exhilaration for strength and applies the whip instead of nourish ment to her poor, exh...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Furious Woman of Wichita. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

The Furious Woman of Wichita. A "Wichita, Kan., woman took the law into her own hands the other day, and cffectiially raided a rum-shop in that town. She had given the liquor-seller due warning' that if he sold her husband any more liquor she would break up his place. She was as good as her word. As her husband did not return home at night, she armed herself with an axe, broke open the door of the liquor-shop which she found locked, smashed in an inner door and drove the bar-keeper from the house. In one of the room Mra.Elmer found her husband drunk. This infuriated her still more, and she broke the glass in the bar-room, all the windows and the furni ture. When she had completely wrecked the place she gave the drunken husband a few cufis, marched him home and adminis tered a first-class flogging with a horse whip.

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Effects of Hasheesh. [Newspaper Article] — Windsor and Richmond Gazette — 9 February 1889

Effects of Hasheesh I A. M. Field has recently recounted his j experience under the influence of hasheesh. He smoked the hasheesh until he folt a profound sense of well-being and then put the pipe aside. After a few minutes he seemed to become two persons; he was cons cious of his real self reclining on a lounge and of why he was there; his double was in a vast building made of marble, splendidly brilliant and beautiful beyond all description. He felt an extreme gratification and believed himself in heaven, Thia double personality suddenly vanished, but reappeared in a few minutes. His real self was undergoing rhythmical spasms throughout his body; the double was a marvellous instrument, pro ducing sounds of exquisite sweetness and perfect rhythm. Then sleep ensued and all ended. Upon another occasion sleep and waking came so rapidly that they seemed to be confused. His double seemed to be a sea, bright and tossing' as the wind blew: then a continent. Again he smoked a double dose, ...

Publication Title: Windsor And Richmond Gazette
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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