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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Latest Harvester. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

The Latest Harvester.         HARVESTING WHEAT IN CALIFORNIA WITH A STEAM OUTFIT. The accompanying illustration, showing how they do things in America, is from Bulletin No. 20 Miscellaneous Series U. S. Department of Agriculture and Division of Statistics repro- duced in the latest "Scientific American." It deals with the wheat-growing and general agricultural conditions in the Pacific Coast region, and shows the rapid advances that are being mads in the direction of labor-saving machines. The continued harvester is the latest and most wonderful production. It is after the manner of the machinery used in the pork factories of Chicago, which are popularly supposed to receive the pigs at one end, and turn them out in strings of sausages at the other. It may truly be said of this latest harvester that it practically does all this in the wheat field—it cuts, it threshes, and it bags and dumps the grain thus ready for the market, ready ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOUSA'S BAND. THE ENGLISH TOUR. A PROFIT OF £24,000. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

SOUSA'S BAND. THE ENGLISH TOUR.   —♦—       A PROFIT OF £24,000. Sousa, the famous American conductor, who is likely to visit Australia with his band shortly, recently left Southhampton for New York, after a successful English tour. There was a large crowd to witness the de- parture of the American March King and his instrumentalists. Enthusiastic demonstrations took place, the band playing several of their conductor's compositions.   Interviewed on board by an "Express" re- presentative, Sousa remarked: "I and the members of my band have been delighted with our visit; both from an artistic and social standpoint we could not have been treated nicer. "We have made friends and have played to the same kind of audiences as in America. We found it was no use saying we were a great band; we had to play and demonstrate it. Afterwards people said lots of nice things about it." With regard to his visit to the King and Queen at ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Discovery and invention. M. SEVERO'S AIRSHIP. UNIQUE VESSEL TO CARRY THREE PASSENGERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Discovery and invention. M. SEVERO'S AIRSHIP. —♦— UNIQUE VESSEL TO CARRY THREE PASSENGEBS. M. Severo's airship is so nearly completed that her trial trip—a circular voyage round Paris is expected in a few days (says the "Westminster Gazette" of December 12). The balloon was ready some days ago. The "hull," or framework, of the vessel is quite original in design, with a bulk of six or seven times that of the Santos-Dumont cradle. The longitudinal section of M. Severo's cradle is a symmetrical geometric figure, consisting (says the London "Daily Telegraph's cor- respondent) of two adjacent squares, on the two outer vertical sides of which are built two rectangular triangles, one side of each triangle being in a line with the upper sides of the two squares. The sides of the triangles and of the squares mea- sure nine metres (about 28ft.) each. The total length of the system is, accordingly, 112ft. above, and 48ft. below, approximately. The bottom of the frame consists of two stout wood...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PENNY A CALL 'PHONES. SOME STARTLING CLAIMS FOR A FRENCH INVENTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PENNY A CALL 'PHONES. SOME STARTLING CLAIMS FOR A FRENCH INVENTION. The chairman of the Automatic Telephone Com- pany, London, made some startling claims at the meeting of the company recently. As soon as they could get into working order, he said they would mark a new era in the tele- phone world. He had had an opportunity of seeing the work- ing model of the telephone in Paris, where it was exhibited by Mr. Saligman Louis, the inventor. Mr. Louis, who was the Inspector-General of Telephones for the French Government, and had the whole of the telephone exchanges under his control, was to accept 40,000 fully paid shares for his invention, besides the position of consulting engineer to the company. The invention was soon to be offered to the G.P.O., the National Telephone Company, the L.C.C., and the majority of the municipal tele- phone companies at a rate which would complete- ly revolutionise those of the present time. It had not been fully decided upon, but it was expected that t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO HELP THE BLIND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

TO HELP THE BLIND.     —♦—         An invention which promises to be of great   service in the education of the blind has lately   been perfected by M. Dussaud. By the new pro-   cess the writer is enabled not merely to punch out the letter required and discover it in relief at the back after withdrawing the paper from the frame, but he is capable of punching each letter so that it rises in relief as he goes along. The student is therefore able to detect errors at once and correct them, and the time saved to professor and pupil by having an alphabet which may be read as it is written or written as it is read is enormous.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TWINKLING STARS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

TWINKLING STARS.   Since Aristotle there have been theories to account for the twinkling of the stars. A paper read before the Berlin Astronomical Society brings them up to date. Star scintillations are now attributed to irregular refraction in the earth's atmosphere, due to successive warmer and cooler air currents, or to this cause com- bined with regular atmospheric dispersion. Pro- fessor Exner, who read the paper, imitated the effects by means of a prism and a piece of window glass, the glass being moved to repre- sent the action of the wind.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PAPER STOCKINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PAPER STOCKINGS.   The latest with regard to paper is that we are to have stockings—real stockings—made of that   material which we are apt to think sacred to the uses of the library. It is said that paper can easily be made into a sort of strong twine; this is roughened to give it a woolly look, and it is then knitted as though it were the real thing. This curious hosiery (states the "Liverpool Post") is to be retailed at a price averaging three-halfpence a pair, which will go far to lighten the labors of the patient (or impa- tient) work and washer women; for who would darn stockings with new ones at hand at that unheard-of price?

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PHOTOGRAPHING A WINK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PHOTOGRAPHING A WINK. A German scientist has given another proof   of the painstaking nature of his race in obtain-   ing perfect accuracy and the most minute de-   tail of all things. This savant has measured   the time that is occupied by a wink. He used a   special photographic apparatus, and fixed a   piece of white paper on the edge of the eyelid   for a mark. He found that the lid descends   quickly, and rests a little at the bottom move-   ment. Then it rises more slowly than it fell.   The mean duration of the downward movement   was from .075 to .091 of a second. The time from   the instant the eye rested till it closed varied   from 0.15 to 0.17 of a second. In rising the lid   took 0.17 of a second. The wink was completed   in 0.4 of a second.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CASCADE OF ELECTRIC FURNACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

CASCADE OF ELECTRIC FURNACES. —♦— An article by Dr. Bermbach in the "Elek-   trochemische Zeitschrift" describes a cascade   arrangement of electric furnaces for use in the   manufacture of glass, which may have a most   important effect on that industry.   The great feature of the new method will be   that instead of a large tank holding a great   mass of molten glass, the electric furnace re-   quires but a single pot, into which a small   stream of glass is continually flowing, as water   runs from a pipe.   Little or no time is lost in starting, since the   great heat of the electric arc produces an im-   mediate fusion of the powdered materials, and   hence the operation may be started or stopped   at any time by the mere turning on or off the   electric current and the flo...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIGH ELECTRICAL PRESSURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

  HIGH ELECTRICAL PRESSURE.   At a time when electrical engineers are turn-   ing their attention more and more to the use   of high pressures in transmitting electricity to a distance, some remarks made by Dr. Perrine to the Society of American Engineers on the transmission of high voltages may prove even popularly interesting. The chief consideration in transmitting high voltages, such as 20,000 or 30,000 volts, is that the conductors along which the electric current travels should be per- fectly insulated; and when the voltage rises to still higher tension, such as 50,000 or 60,000 volts, this insulation becomes a matter of the greatest difficulty. Ordinary insulators will not do; special in- sulators of only the very best insulating ma- terial, such as glass or porcelain, have to be manufactured, and have to be of great size. A diameter of a foot in the insulator becomes necessary. Extraordinary precautions must be taken, too, ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABOUT HANGMEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

ABOUT HANGMEN. In last week's Issue of "The World's News" an   account was published of the death of Billington,   the British hangman, by our special correspondent   in London. The London "Express," dealing with   the same subject, says:—   "The hangman—writes Major Arthur Griffiths—   is no more than a contractor, and the responsi-   bility for his engagements rests with the sheriff,   who may take any person he chooses, but who will   obviously accept the services of someone with   experience. It is in this way the business has   come to be more or less monopolised by one indi-   vidual. As we have heard the same name con-   tinuously for a period of years, Calcraft, Mar-   wood, or Billington, an idea has grown up that   the office of hangman exists, which is not the case. "It might be b...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NAUTCH DANCER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

THE NAUTCH DANCER. She pirouettes and flutters in a sheen Of iridescent silks and dazzling light, A gorgeous fairy firefly of the night, Of Oriental loveliness the queen. Anon, through gauzes delicate and white, By sudden supple movements unforeseen, Her lithe round limbs evade their shifting screen, And half reveal their splendors to the sight. And as I mark her youthful grace, entranced, My pulses beat in rhythm with her feet; I think of all the beauties who have danced To win the world's applause, to them so sweet, And smile, beatified, to know that she Is all content to charm the heart of me. —The Rajah, in "Town Topics."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Marvellous Skating Feat. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A Marvellous Skating Feat. Walter Monroe, of Toronto, leaping over four barrels and a chair.   This sketch, which is reproduced from an article on "The Art of Figure Skating," in the January "Munsey," illustrates the most remarkable skating feat on record. Altogether outside the art of figure skating, Walter Monroe comes well within the realm of wonderful performers. "One of his favorite feats," says the writer, "and one unrivalled in the history of the sport, is his trick of jumping over four barrels standing in a row before him. Occa- sionally he varies this feat by seating a man on one or other of the barrels, and leaping over the barricade so formed. On glassy ice, with heavy racing skates screwed to the soles of one's boots, these things are less simple than might be imagined from the skater's sang froid. They do not enter, however, into legitimate skating. In Australia, where ice, except in chests, is not usually found, the nearest approach to this has been the tr...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHEN HE DOESN'T LIKE CIDER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WHEN HE DOESN'T LIKE CIDER.   "One of those bucolic poets has written on   the theme, 'When Cider Tastes the Best.'     haven't read it, but I know when cider tastes   the worst. It is when it is labelled 'Cham-   pagne,' and costs you 15s per quart."   —"Buffalo Express."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EVERYTHING WAS BRIGHT AND FAIR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

EVERYTHING WAS BRIGHT AND FAIR. —♦—   I had never seen the distance quite so purple. I had never seen the sky so softly blue; I had never seen the nearer hills so verdant, I had never got such pleasure from the view; To be sure, the air was fresh and clear and balmy, To be sure, the sun was shining over all; To be sure, the plains beneath were filled with plenty, 'Neath the shelter of the rugged mountain wall— But within my inner being was a reason That augmented nature's beauty quite a lot— I had had a first-class appetite for breakfast And had just devoured a good one, piping hot. —S. W. Gillilan in Los Angeles "Herald."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FISH THAT GROWLS AND SNARLS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A FISH THAT GROWLS AND   SNARLS.   —♦— Scientists are now studying with much interest a very remarkable fish in the Museum of Natural History in Paris. It is known as the "ceratodus," or "baramunda," and it is mainly remarkable because until a short time ago it was supposed to be extinct. It is provided with a double means of respira- tion; in other words, it breathes through the lungs like most of the bactrachians, and it can also breathe by means of branchiae, after the manner of an ordinary fish. For a long time na- turalists were doubtful whether animals provided with double sets of respiratory organs ought to be classed among fish, but since the discovery of the "ceratodus" this question has been set at rest, for now it is considered absolutely certain that animals of this type are genuine fish. This singular fish is found in Burnett, Dawson, and Mary Rivers, in Queensland, being known to the natives there as baramunda and to the colon- ists as the Bur...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Coming of Dalny. RUSSIA'S GREAT TERMINUS IN THE FAR EAST. AN ABSOLUTELY FREE PORT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Coming of Dalny. RUSSIA'S GREAT TERMINUS IN THE FAR EAST. —«— AN ABSOLUTELY FREE PORT. The new city of Dalny, the eastern terminus of the Siberian Railway, which Russia expects to become the most important of all the European settlements in the Far East, was opened to general commercial business early in December. Already the town has a population of 50,000, 23,000 of whom are workmen, the great majority Chinese, with many Russians, Japanese, and Koreans. Twelve million roubles have been expended on the town and its harbor works, under the direction of the chief engineer and manager, M. Waldemar Sakharof, and 23 millions more are to be spent on further improvements. Russia's policy is to make Dalny the principal seaport of the Far East by making it the most economical one. It will be an absolutely free port. No custom-house will be established, and the harbor system is modelled to a great extent on that of Japan with the lowest possible taxes in the form of tonnage, dock, or warehou...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MORE CHILDREN'S HUMOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

MORE CHILDREN'S HUMOR. In the new "Liberal Review," Dr. Macnamara, in an article entitled "The Witticisms of Chil- dren," gives a few examples of composition. He guarantees the following, but it is rather too consciously sarcastic for a boy of 11½:—   "What I expect to do in my holidays is the greater part of the time to mind the baby. Two years and a half old. Just old enough to run into a puddle or to fall downstairs. Oh! what a glorious occupation, my aunt or Sunday school teacher would say. But it is all very well for them; they ought to have a turn with him. I   am going to have a game at tying doors, tying   bundles of mud in paper, and then drop it on the   pavement. I shall buy a bundle of wood and tie   a piece of cord to it, and when someone goes to   pick it up, lo! it has vanished—not lost, but   gone before. I shall go butterfly-catching, and   catch some fish at Snob...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CAN'T BLOW OUT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

    CAN'T BLOW OUT.   —♦— Hotelkeepers who offer accommodations of the   kind preferred by casual visitors from the country   will learn with pleasure that a burner is about   to be put upon the market which the inexperi-   enced lodger may blow out if he wants to without   ill effects. Its parts are so arranged that to   afford a gas passage a certain amount of heat   must be applied to expand them.   While thus expanded they offer a gasway suffi-   cient for illumination. When the flame is ex-   tinguished the rapid cooling of the parts causes   them to contract, which closes the gasway in less   than one minute. What little gas escapes in the   interval of cooling, which is facilitated by the   shape of the parts and their thinness, is not   enough t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MUCH THINKING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

MUCH THINKING.   If I tho't she tho't the tho't I think,   I wouldn't be so fearful; But to think my tho't she may not think, Makes me most mighty keerful. I never tho't I'd think the tho't I think I'm ever thinking, But, think and think, and think I must, And wonder what she's thinking. I think she thinks I think I love her, And that helps me a little; She thinks I think she thinks she loves me, But she is non-committal. I think I'll think the tho't I've tho't, And then approach her boldly; If she thinks what I think she tho't, She will not treat me coldly. Oh, I've tho't and tho't and tho't and tho't What Jane thinks of the matter, Till my heart that once went pitty pat, Is going pitty patter. So I must learn the tho'ts Jane thinks, For think I can not longer Of tho'ts I wonder if she thinks— My love is growing stronger! ****** Oh, I tho't she tho't the tho't I tho't, And now, umph! I know it, oh! For I told Jane the tho't I tho't, And Jane said. "I think...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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