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Elephind.com contains 185,322 items from Prairie Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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VETERINM DEPARTMENT [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

VETERINM DEPARTMENT To CORE A SNAKE BITE-. An exchange paper says that the bark of yellow poplar ; bruised , made into a poultice and applied to the wound —at the same time- trial the wound is bathed with , a strong decoction of the same , and the patient given a half pint to drinlt every half nour , will • f & ct a cure * Charcoal made into a paste with hog s lard andehanged often , is also pronounced sovereign . To which we add indigo , treated in the same manner . FARMERS , LOOK WELL TO YOUR STOCK . This is the season for the horn distemper to show itself perhaps more than any other season of the year . The symptoms are , general lassitude , dryness of the nose , drooping of the eyes , coldness of the horns , & c . The Remedy . Take one gill of ground mustard , one spoonful of Cayenne pepper , i pint of good vinegar , j gill of spirits turpentine , £ gill of salt , one gill of-whiskey or other spirits ; mix the above , nnd pour one gill of the mixture into...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SOWING CLOVER SEED . e [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

SOWING CLOVER SEED . e I The following mode of sowing clover seed was invented by Mr . Bradley , of Maryland . Make a box , eight or ten feet long , three or four inches in breadth , and divide it into partitions of six inches each in length . In the bottom of each partition is an opening of three inches square , in which is inserted a piece of tin oo stiff paper , perforated with a number of holes of sufficient size for the seed to pass through . The seed being put in each partition , and the box hung b y a strap which passes over the neck , is carried before the man using it , whrT walks over the field and shakes it as needed . Its advantages am ; that it sows tho seed far more evenly than can be done by the hand , and enables a given quantity of seed to go much farther . A thin piece of board may be hooked to the bottom of the box t to prevent the seed shaking out till the sowing begins . , )

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
HOW TO KILL WEEDS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

HOW TO KILL WEEDS . Vegetable physiologists know that the point of junctionbetween trie roots and fop of a plant sustains very important relations to the life of it . It is called the neck—from the fact that injury , inflicted there , is apt to be as fatal tr > the plant as a-similar injury is to an animal . Hence iw destroying weeds , more may be done in a little lime , by aiming to cut them off at this vital point , than with far greater exertion expended in di gging Intern * up . Let any one try the experiment of exterminating weeds by the two methods of setting his hoe light , and skimming them off just below the surface of the ground ; and of labpriously digging deep , so as to cdt them off far down the roots , and he will come to a conclusion in the matter . Mr . Ellsworth , Commissioner of Patents , estimates trie value of the eggs annually consumed in the United States at eight millions of dollars , rating them at six cents per doa 1000 are used daily at the Astor...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
A RAT TRAP [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

A RAT TRAP We mentioned last month that these animals were becoming troublesome in some of the counties about here . A farmer has since told us that in removing a manure heap , he killed sixty of them . A nuisance of such magnitude , it is worth a trial to abate . A tub of water , as related in another column , will sometimes be found successful , but will oftener fail ; for a rat is not an animal to get drowned needlessly , while his comrades are suffering the same thing before his eyes ; though when nearly starved , as in the case alluded to , he will run some risks . His great caution and cunning are objections to most of the other modes in common , use for taking him , such as steel , box , and wire traps—which only get now and then one of the greener subjects . Above is the representation of a mode which we believe more perfect than any in existence . The plan is given in Loudon ; though we have simplified the cut . The advantages of this mode are , that it is always ready—obvi...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
FELTING WOOL . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

FELTING WOOL . No small amount of speculation has been expended , first and last , on the philosophy of felting . The secret was finally hit upon by a French chemist , M . Monge , which was carried to successful demonstration b y Mr . Youart . Two fibres , one of Merino and one of South Down wool , were placed in the focus of a powerful microscope , and examined as transparent objects . The fibres assumed a ribband-like form * o ! a pearly gray color , with faint lines across them , and with serrated edges . These serration numbered as many as 2 , 400 in the space of an inch , and all projected from the root to the point . The fibres as thus viewed are represented in the cut by the figures 2 , which is the Merino , and 4 , the South Down . Two others of the . same kinds of wool were then subjected to . the microscope as opaque objects . Lines of division across them , corresponding in number and distance with the serrations viewed in the other fibres , were visible . The truth of M ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
BAD FARMING . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

BAD FARMING . [ For OK Praitie Farmer . BY JOHN WRIGHT . MESSRS . EDITORS : YOU complain much about bad farming , and there are good grounds for complaint ; but there are some good reasons in the case . You cannot do as good writing with a bad pen as . tt good otie . This is the case with the farmer . He carries on his business with the worst tools of all branches of fairTiu esS that make use of tools . What is the cause of thir ? Why , sirs , it takes thiee workmen to put the plow in operation . Many plans and patterns have been sought out , but , none complete—and to make short words—there never will be a complete plow—until one and tho same man becomes completely master of all three branches in the case—trie -blacksmith , the carpenter and the plowman . Good farmers have always labored under this difficulty . But there are other tillers of tho soil , who if they have never so good a plow , cant hitch their team so as to pull it fair and make good work . They are no more than land...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
¦ fcoMMENTS—POOR STOCK-SHEEP . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

¦ fcoMMENTS—POOR STOCK-SHEEP . f For the Prairie Farnw . ., * i • ; i HI LEWIS ELLSWORTH . .,.-,- ,., MESSRS . E / DITOBS ; , The March number of the . Prairie Fanner came , to . hand this day . , 1 . am ... very , happy , to again ) see ) som e of our old friends who have , long been . absent from ! the columns of the Farmer , ; to wit , E . W . Brewr ster , Solon Robinson , A .-Churchill , andT . im . Hardup , { now Mr . Hardu p . ) I . an / . very , g lad to see .. that Mr . H . ; has overcome some of the ™ diffic , ulties he formerly labored under ; instead of seeking instruction he now Ventures to give it . As to bis remarks on , the preventive of smut in wheat ,, my experience gives sanction to the truth . FrbnUhe manner the correspondent of , E . W . Brewster wields his pen ,. I should say he is of the ) rig ht stuff for an Ulinpis . farrner ; we want , more with us that are men of . research .. , Many of us on the subject of agriculture ,- are like some of the plow- * ing he...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
BLOOD HORSE . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

BLOOD HORSE . \ For the Frame Farmer . BY O . A . ROSE . MESSRS-. EDITORS : I am by profession a physician , but having been reared in < the centre of Virginia , where great attention has ever been paid to tKe blood horse even before the revolution . I was induced three years ago , in view of the condition of our stock of horses , ( which is your condition at present ) to procure a thorough bred horse , with short legs and a good belly . One of his colts obtained the premium at our last fair . In the two last numbers you seem to feel the want of stock and to urge your readers lo be up and doing , and as I profess , to . know something of the blood horse , and really love the noble animal , I shouldbe glad 10 disabuse the public mind relative to their inferiority , as work animals ... As to the working properties of the blood- horse , we know that a certain quantum of weight is needful for heavy draft , and that is obtained by breeding the coarse mare to the Wood ! horse ....

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE BIG RAT-TRAP . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

THE BIG RAT-TRAP . • [ For the Prairie Farmer . JJ . r WM . BUNI . AP . MESSRS . EDITORS : Seeing some inquires of some for the best way of destroying rats , I will g ive my experience in that matter . About 40 years a « o when I was a young man and lived in Cherry Valley , New York , the rats ^ got so plenty about the close of our harvest that they were like to destroy the whole country . My fathers barn seemed to be alive with the rascals . We soon commenced getting out our grain as fast as we could with horses—thrashing machines were not in fashion then—wo filled the boxes in our granary full and the rats would seem to destroy bushels in anight . Accordingly I set a hogshead in the entry way of the granary and rilled it of oats and covered all the bins over with pieces of board as well as-1 could , ami placed short boards for the rats to run on to that hogshead . They soon found that very convenient for them , and in i or 3 nights ( hey seemed to eat out near 2 bushels , linen to...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
0 RCIIAR 1 ) S-LYE FOR WHEAT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

0 RCIIAR 1 ) S-LYE FOR WHEAT . [ For the Prairie Farmer MESSRS . EDITORS : I have been a farmer from a child and am now nearly sixty years old , and len of my last years have been spent in Illinois , La Salle county ,, bull get much instruction from your paper . Through this we get each other s experience ; and as it is a new country , We have to Work much by experiments until we get more acquainted with the soil and climate . I find the treatment of the diseases of animals and the cure for the same is of great use to the farmer . One man says the recipe for the cure of colic in horses , vol . iii . number 1 , p . 14 , saved him one valuable horse ; a woman says the recipf ! for coloring blue with pusley is worth to her the price of One years paper . Thus in many things too numerous to mention , we gain knowledge through the Prairie Farmer . Thus we see it is important that practical and experienced farmers as well as others should g ive their aid to make it interesting and profitab...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ORCHARD AND GARDEN . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

ORCHARD AND GARDEN . [ For the Prairie Farmer : WILD BLACK RASPBERRY . STRAWBERRIES ; Br W , C . GftlSENLEAF . MESSRS . EDITORS : It is the prevailing opinion , I ¦ beJ lieve , that the black raspberry plants which grow wild iri every grove , and along old fences , are all precisely alike , and that if you wish to transplant them to your garden , you may dig them wherever you can find them , and that the fruit of all will be equally abundant and excellent . Experience , however , has convinced me that this opinion is unfounded , and that there is a very great , variety in the individual plants , some of which , with the most careful cultivation , will never produe e good fruit , o r will not pro- 5 duce it in sufficient abundance to repay the cost of cultivation , while others will producelarge and delicious fruit , by handfuls . But your leaders shall have the facts on which this opinion of mine is built . Within the . last six years I have dug up and transferred , from 1 the timbe...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
STRAWBERRIES . HORSERADISH . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

STRAWBERRIES . HORSERADISH . [ For the Prairie Farmei BT JOHN MORIUS . MESSRS . EDITORS : I have frequentl y been asked how I cultivate strawberries , so as to obtain a sufficient supply , with so little expense as to make it quit cost . Now I find if farmers generally cannot get along with these small fixins without much trouble , they depend on Madam Natures garden , which is rather uncertain . I will give you my method ; and also answer the inquiries of one of your correspondents , which should have been answered a year ago . ^ I select a piece of ground , say 10 or 35 rods for a family of seven persons ; am not particular as to the state of , cultivation ,-if the grass is killed out ; break the surface to the depth of two inches or more , and set in the plants 18 inches apart each way . As to the time , I prefer about the first or middle of April , but it will answer well after they are in blossom ; they should be kept clean until they begin to run , freely , after which they wi...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
BLACK TARTARIAN CHERRY . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

BLACK TARTARIAN CHERRY . This is one of the most excellent of all our cherries ; of which some catalogues number near three hundred varieties . The fruit is most luscious in flavor , and grows to a very large size , being often an inch in diameter . The tree is a great bearer , and from this results the danger of the fruit being too much crowded , when it is liable to rot . The fruit ripens in July . The cultivation of cho | ce cherries , though generally deemed a simple and easy matter , has not succeeded in this State quite as well as anticipated , considering that a rich , dry , sandy , or gravelly soil , such as most of this and the adjoining States furnish , is the best for this fruit . It niay be , that our warm stimulating atmosphere , and rich soil , too oyerteeming with heat and energy , may have been the chief difficulty . If so , a slower culture is to be recommended . Slitting down the bark with a knife has been found in some cases successful ; thereby giving scope for t...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES . EXPERIMENTAL FARM IN ST . CLAIR COUNTY . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES . EXPERIMENTAL FARM IN ST . CLAIR COUNTY . [ For the Prairie Farmer . BY DR . A . W . CASAD . MESSRS . EDITORS : Our extraordinary warm . jlry and pleasant winter has afforded us the opportunity to plow our corn and oats ground , and much of it having been done prior to 22 d February , the farmers concluded to celebrate the day in honor of him who lives in our hearts , and for the first time weigh each others thoughts on the subject of our profession in general , and the propriety of forming a society for our improvement in particular . Discussion resulted in the pretty general conviction of ( lo say the least , ) the inutility , if not the folly , of forming a society which should contain the elements of its own dissolution ; namely , the system of appropriating the funds in premiums for beasts , crops , & c . & c . thus generally taking from the poor and giving to the rich , alias paying a rich man to raise a good crop of corn to feed...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE STRAWBERRY . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

THE STRAWBERRY . This fruit is easy of cultivation ; -and if successfully treated , enough njaybe grown on a few square rods to supply a family : and of far better quality than those gathered from the fields . But the question is , how can they be cultivated successfully ? for though there is no groat secret about it , some have failed in the trial . In the first , place , the right kind of plants must be hail . Those which have borne several years must bo cast out , and their places supplied by young vines . . Those wliich blossom and do not bear , or those which do not bear , whether they blossom or not , arc to be discarded . Thebaic plants , of whatever kind , are to be thrown out , with a few exceptions—say one male to fifty females . In some kinds it is difficult to distinguish between them , while in others it ia easy , as in the Hudson , shown by a cut oti the 84 th page of our third volume . But the safe rule is , to destroy tho barren plants ; and great care is needed to s...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
MATTERS IN MISSISSIPPI . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

MATTERS IN MISSISSIPPI . [ For the Prairie Farmer ni SOLON KOBIKSOK . M ESSRS . EDITORS : To you who know of my wanderings , it may not seem very surprising that I dale from this place , but lo some of your ? eaders it may not be amiss to assure them in advance , that I am that same old coon whose communications have so often been dated from Lake C . H . Indiana . And how shall I make this communication interesting to my friends up near the north pole ? Why first I will tell you what farmers are doing in this latitude now in this month of February . First then , many are busy planting corn ! Planting corn ! I think I hear some of you say , while chopping a hole in the ice to water your learn preparatory to doing a day s work sledding up wood . Planting corn ! wh y where is the fellow , at the equator ? Let s have the map . Ah ! true ; Mississippi docs run pretty well down south , but not quite to the equator . But next , where is Log Hall , where they are planting corn while we are ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
BUTTER AND CHEESE . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

BUTTER AND CHEESE . [ For the Prairie Farmei MESSRS . E DITORS : If it be not intrusive I will remark on the subject of butter and cheese made while cattle . run at large on the native prairie , that I fear your remarks in the February . number are calculated lo mislead the public and possibly discourage some who otherwise might engage in what I am satisfied is one of the most profitable branches of husbandry followed here . It is possible that the nutritive qualities of the prairie grass so disposes cows to fatten as that the amount of butter or cheese in a season , niay be something less than when fed on tho tame grasses—possibly 10 or 15 per cent , but not certainly—very few tests have been made which can be called satisfactory . Few dairymen here undertake to make the most of their dairy , but all more or less grow stock at the same time—the Jailer as yet being an object nearly or quite equal to the former where , as . in the north , few farms are supplied . But as lo quality I ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
TIME TO CUT TIMOTHY . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

TIME TO CUT TIMOTHY . . i i : a «^» osn »» i——* . [ For Ifa Prairie Farmer . 11 T D . I » KIMBALL . MESSRS , ECITOES : 1 observed-sometime since in your paper some observations by Mr . Reeves upon the proper time of cutting timothy which agreed , precisely with my own observations . Sometime after I noticed an article from Mr . Grant , which by the way had many good ideas in it ; but Mr . Grant : winds up by sweeping away by one brush the idea of letting timojhy , stand till the ; seed is formed . He says the time to cut is , when it is just in the blow ; that it will not hurt the root andAif it did he would cut it then ; and would not feed his horses on hay stalks at any rate . . Men sometimes reason closely on some subjects and take others for granted without allowing observation or reason any part in the matter ; , and I am inclined , to think that Mr . Grant haslet his prejudice against hay stalks , shut out the light of experience .. It is a fact that limothyor any other grass ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
REVIEW OF THE APRIL NUMBER , [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

REVIEW OF THE APRIL NUMBER , [ For Ihe Prairie Farmer , BY J . tl . THOMPSON . MESSRS . EDITORS . The April number satisfies us that you are willing lo give us a fair trial , so here we go again , if you think there is no prospect of our interfering with the rights of your Woodburn reviewer , of the State of Macoupin . Wc are happy to see this spirited criticism on Judge Robinsons travels through the Slate of Macoupin , a county fully equal to Lake co ., Indiana , and Woodbum a town-equal to Crown Point , Judge—eh ? Charity begins at liome . But we said enough in our last to convince our readers that wc thought the Judge had so much Lake county sand in his eyes that it was playing the Dickens with hirp , aptl as il is not our intention to fight the battle oypr agajn , we leavo ihe Judge in the hands of oqr faithful ally—reviewer . We hope the Judge will continue liis Trolloppiana sketches wherever he gpes and thps render the \ Ypo , dburns , the Bunker Hills , & c . as n...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
GOPHERS . ONE WAY TO SETTLE THE I ) IF *> CIJJTY . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 May 1845

GOPHERS . ONE WAY TO SETTLE THE I ) IF *> CIJJTY . f For the Prairie Farmer , BY II . T . COU . IKS . MESSRS . E DITORS : If your correspondent in Iowa has or can obtain that particular friend of the rat more commonly known as the steel trap , ! will lell him how lo lake in the gopher ; but before doing so let mo coincide with him in the opinion that ihe gopher is a pest , whether you find him on the plains of Arkansas , or in the meadow , orchard , or garden . Tho little scamp is especially industrious in destroying the roots and consequently the superstructure of app le trees ; and if he cannot root 10 pieces and destroy the looks of a clover field more effectually than any hog in the country , then i never saw a hen-coop . The way I destroy them is as follows : Go in the morning soon after sunrise , or in the evening soon before sunset , lo the place where they are at work , and if you find them working , so much the better ; but as you more usually find only the ncwl ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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