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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

' j? . ." i The Indian Advocate. .308 month to -implore the Divine mercy in favor of the Church, and to thank the Almighty for the protection He has hereto fore afforded them through the patronage and intercession of the Mother of God, implored with extraordinary fervor in the devotion of the Rosary. The Rosary is a practice of devotion in which the faithful are taught to honor our Divine Redeemer in the fifteen principal mysteries of His sacred life and of His Holy Mother. It is therefore an abridgment of the gospel, a history of the life, sufferings and triumphant victory of Jesus Christ, and an exposition of what He did in the flesh which He assumed for our salvation. It ought certainly to be the principal object of the devotion of every Christian always to bear in mind, those holy mysteries, to return to God a perpet ual homage of love, praise and thanksgiving for them, to im plore His mercy through them, to make them the subject of his assiduous meditation, regulate his life, e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

7'M,r 300 The Indian Advocate. ' -yj j---yf vl MISSIONS IN THE INDIAN TERRITORY. COALOAT13. In the spring of 1889 coal fields were discovered six miles north of Lehigh, and many miners, as is generally the case, flocked thither. A slope was soon in operation, and shortly after a mine was sunk one mile further. Curious enough, the slope was christened "Cottonwood," and the mine across Caney creek "Coal Gate." To-day, however, the camp is known as Coalgate. First mass was said here in Mr. John Devlin's boarding house, December 25, 1889, by the Prefect Apostolic, D. Ignatius Jean, O. S. B. Subsequently services were held in the same house every other Sunday. A church was built in 1890, and from that time on till this day divine service is held every Sunday of the year except the fifth. The church was solemnly blest May 31, 1890, by the late "Rt. Rey. Abbot, Thomas Duperon, O. S. B., the Administra tor of the Prefecture, assisted by Revs. PI. Diericks, and the Pastor. A charitable lady ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

Thf Indian Advocai. 310 te BOCJGY DEPOT. ThisviTjission was founded in 1885. It was visited three times a year by Fr. Adalbertr from Sacied Heart Mission. When the reverend s gentleman became pastor qf Lehigh he visited it monthlv. ' - i The Late Rt. Re. AJjb t Thomas Duperon, 0. S. II In 1891 the little flock of fervent conveits ertcted a neat little chapel in honoi of the Sricrd Ileait 0 Jesus. ut

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

r 311 The Indian Advocate. since then death made a sad havoc, and the survivors have moved away. At this writing both chapel and Catholics of Boggy are a thing of the heroic past. CA DDO. Caddo. has no church. Mass is said ' monthly in the hospitable home of Mr. M. O'Dea, a staunch Catholic gentleman of the "old 'sod" and a sturdy pioneer of the .wild West. SILO. Mass is said in Silo, eight miles from .Durant, at Mrs. Mudd's dwelling. v DURANT. t Durant is a thriving town of the kev. d.hii'i'olytk, o.'s. n. West. It is situated on the M., K. & T. R. R. It has a chapel, in which mass Ms said every third Sunday of the month. tishomix;o. ? This is the capital of the Chickasaw Nation. Mass4 ",is said here only when requested by the Catholics"iiving in. the place. v ',k - . i o o oJt It is said by the "whitewash" press that Miss Morrison, the Kansas murderess, expressed great abhorrence of the deed of Czolgosz. And yet that woman is guilty bf as henjouS a crime as that of the anarchi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. 312 --" i j MONKS IN SOUTH AFRICA. I : The "lazy monks" have recently been doing something among the Kaffirs and Zulus in South Africa, according to the following account from a writer in the Natal Mercury, as quoted by the Loudon Catholic Times.: "An estate of 12,000 acres was bought there (Marianhill, near Durban) by the Trappists eighteen years ago. The place was then practically a wilderness. The monks set to making bricks and quarrying stone for buildings erecting a monas tery, boarding schools for their Kaffir boys, workshops, stores, school rooms; offices, kitchens, millsj-telegraph and telephone offices, hospital and consulting rooms, bath rooms, museum, art and-science rooms for chemistry, hydraulics and astrono nfy, besides a college class room and library for their sub jectsprobationists of the Order; also houses for all sorts of machinery and farming implements, stables kand' byres for cattle, and barns, piggeries, fowl houses and poultry yards. The ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

313 The Indian Advocate. monks. The work at Marianhill is a perfect wonder, and is undoubtedly a blessing to South Africa." A "perfect wonder" it .may tie to those whose ideas of monks and their doings are obtained from certain Protestant sources, but no wonder at all to any well-informed person. a a oJt SPEAK AlKIND WORD.. '.,:' '." Few people realize how much happiness may'be promoted by a few kind words of "cheer spoken in moments oFrdespond ency by words of encouragement in- seasons,rof, difficulty-, by wordsof commendation when obstacles havfrbeen overcome by effort and perseverance. Words fitly spokeri often sink so deep into the mind and heart of the person"to whom they are addressed that they remain a-fixed, precious and oft-recurring memory a continuous sunshine lighting up years, perhaps, after the lips that have uttered them are sealed in death. A whole life has been changedexalted, expanded'and iHumined by a single-' expression of approval falling' timely upbri b. sen si...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. 314 A BREAKER BOY. The sacrifice which a wife and mother will make for the welfare of those dear to her is happily one of life's common ex periences. A story that comes from the eoal regions of Penn sylvania illustrates this fact, says Youth's Companion. A certain woman's husband had been sick a long time, the funds were exhausted, credit had been refused, and starvation threatened the household, in which there were three little chil dren. The wife, unable to get work in the neighborhood, de--termined to seek it at the nearest coal mine. She knew that no women were or would be employed there, but she put on a suit of her husband's clothes, walked to the mine and applied to the boss for work. She succeeded in getting a place among the breaker boys, and began her duties the next morning. Day after day, dressed like a man, she did a man's work, walking back and forth .between her home and the mines through the winter's cold and snow. She was compelled to endure the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

315 ?. PW 7-'-v ;- The Indian Advocate. IN MEMORIAL. The sad news of the demise of the late Isador Gross has reached us. This staunch friend and supporter of the Advocate died in Bay field, Mo., Aug. 27, 1901. About two years ago he was struck by paralysis, which finally resulted in dropsy, which caused his death. A native of la belle Alsace, Mr. Gross emigrated to this country in i860. During the civil war he served in the iGth Illinois Infantry. He sprang from a family which gave many of her sons and daughters to the church. The late Archbishop Gross was a close relative to the deceased. His nephew, Rev. G. Gerrer, O. S. B., is at present in Rome, to perfect himself in painting and music. Mr. Gross was a well educated, affable and kind gentleman; a friend of the poor and orphans and a benefactor to suffering mankind in general. He is survived by his faithful wife a'nd loving sister, Mrs. Carolina Gerrer, of El Reno, Okla., to whom the earnest sympathy of the Advocate is extended. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. - 316 H jfc'r J.iir I I LOCALS I I 44 4 :: It : - .. Rev. Fr. Blaise, pastor of Sacred Heart, visited in Purcell a few days 1 last month Rev. Fr. William, of Purcell, I. T., visited us Sept. 17, and departed the following day. ' " Rev. Fr., Vincent departed for Rome, on the 27th of August, where ' " he will remain for some time. ' Vi. ' Rev. Fr. Aloysius, who had been spending a few days in Lehigh, I. T., returned on the 18th of September. Rev. Fr. Ketcham, Director of the Catholic Indian Bureau, Wash ', ington, D. C, who has been visiting the Indian Mission Schools in Oklaho ma and Indian Territories, visited us on the 12th of September, and de parted for the east on" the 13th. ' On September. 15th, the Feast of the Holy Name of Mary, our little Church was thronged to its utmost capacity by our dear children and devout '' parishioners to witness the blessing and erection of the new stations of the . ' Cross. The ceremony was performed by the Rt. Rev. Felix DeGr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

m i VBBB3SBSBBB 317 The Indian Advocate. - Cotton picking is now in full progress in this section, and Paris & Sons, the enterprising ginners of Sacred Heart, are busily employed in re ducing it to lint. Work on our new Monastery building is progressing very satisfacto rily. Up to the present writing the weather has been very favorable for building operations. Rt. Rev. Mgr. J. Stephan died in Washington City on September 12. He was a great friend of the Indians, having devoted his energies in behalf of the poor wards of the nation for many years, as Director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. Two years ago he celebrated his golden jubi lee as a priest, and received from Rome the title of Monsignor. Rev. W. Ketcham, the acting Director of the Bureau, is expected to succeed Mgr. Stephan. St. Mary's Academy, a school for Indian girls, opened its doors for the reception of pupils on the 2d of September, under the direction and control of the Sisters of Mercy. Their former ac...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

y The Indian Advocate Vol. XIII. NOVEMBER, 1901. , No. II WE, US & CO. We, Us t nd Co. (they were partners, you know), ' Kept a wee shop many long years ago. "l Ajj.ii?,.. , Us was.a floor walker, We was a cJerk, , j; ,i, .vrji-'' T; Co. did the sweeping and all the hqrd work. , .'? We was obliging, good-natured, polite Certainly' treated the customers right; ' Us was' quite faithful, but-growled a great deal " & "v:i - "Speciallytif urchins attempted to steal. ; t ( '.iw-J- .- - -i.f . . ! ' v . . 2 . ii. All worked together with love and good cheer, o '' . Making a plain, honest living each year; ' , Love for each other continued to grow ' ' '"! Happy, so happy were We, Us and Co. ' . 5 ' Matters went well until one summer day We quit the fjrm and went far, "far away " i Went up to clerk with the angels so glad, Leaving poor Us. and Co. lonely and, sad. ' v, Everything changed in the dim little store; 1 Nothing was ever the same as before ' . " Us sat around, looking sober...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

319 The Indian Advocate. THE NAVAHO RESERVATION. II SWEAT H0USES I tt BY COSMOS MINDELEFF. I L Continued from the October Number. All over the reservation there are hundreus of little struc tures which are miniature models, as it were, of the hogans, but they lack the projecting doorway. These little huts, scarcely as high as a man's hip, look like children's play houses, but they occupy an important place, both in the elaborate religious, ceremonies and in the daily life of the Navaho. They are the sweat houses, called in the Navaho language cotce, a term probably derived from qacotsil, "sweat," and inciniltcet the manner in which fire is prepared for heating the stones placed in it when it is used. The structure is de signed to hold only one person at a time, and he must crawl in and squat on his heels with his knees drawn up to his chin. In the construction of these little huts a frame is made of three boughs with forked ends, and these have the same names as the corresponding ti...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

' "' The Indian Advocate. 320 he is rubbed dry by his friends. This ceremony has a very important place in the medicine man's therapeutics, for devils as well as diseases are thus cast out; but aside from their re ligious use, the cotce are often visited by the Indians for the cleansing and invigorating effect of the bath, with no thought of ceremonial. The Navaho, as a race or individually, are not remarkable for cleanliness, but they use the cotcc freely. During the Yebitcai dance or ceremony four cotce are set around the song house, about 40 yards distant from it, one at each cardinal point. The qacai, or chief medicine man, sweats the patient in them on four successive mornings, just at dawn, beginning at the east and using one each morning. The cotcc on the east is merely an uncovered frame, and after the patient enters it and hot stones have been rolled in it is covered with many blankets and a large buckskin is spread overvall. On this skin the qacali sprinkles iron ochers an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

32i The Indian Advocate. eter. A pinch of sand is sometimes placed under the point of the drill, the rapid . revolution of which produces a fine powder. This powder runs down the notch or groove, form ing a little pile on the ground. Smoke is produced in less than a minute, and finally, in perhaps two minutes, tiny sparks drop on the little pile of dry powder, which takes fire from them. By careful fostering by feeding with bits of bark and grass, and with much blowing, a blaze is produced. It is said that First-man made the first cotcc, After com- ,ing up the qadjinai, or magic reed, he was very dirty; his skin was discolored and he had a foul smell like a coyote. He washed with water, but that did not cleanse him. Then Qastcejini sent the firefly to instruct- him concerning the cotce and how to rotate a spindle of wood in a notched stjck.. v As First-man revolved the spindle, or drill, between his hands, the- firefly ignited the dust at its point with a spark ,of fire which Qastce...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

The Indian Advocate. 322 ceedingly hot and the twins were placed in them successively; but instead of being harmed they came out of the last one stronger and more vigorous than ever. Then the Sun ac knowledged them as his sons and gave the elder one the magic weapons with which he destroyed the evil genii who infested the Navaho land. This is the reason, the Navaho say, why it is well to have many cotcc and to use them fre quently. Their use gives rest and sweet sleep after hard work; it invigorates man for a long journey and refreshes him after its accomplishment. First-woman, after coming up the qadjinai, was also foul and ill-smelling, and after First-man she also used the cotce. Hence the Navaho women use the cotce like the men, but never together except under a certain condition medical in charac ter. The cotce is built usually in some secluded spot, and frequently large parties of men go together to spend the bet ter part ot the day in the enjoyment of the luxury of a sweat ba...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

323 Thi. Indian Advocate. tory to a pastoral people. But aside from the infrequency or absence of armed expeditions the life of the people remained much the same under the changed conditions. When the Atlantic and Pacific railroad entered the country some twenty years or more ago traders came with it, although there were a few in the country before, and numerous trading posts were established in the reservation and about its borders. The effect of this was to fix the pastoral habits of the people. Wool and pelts were exchanged for flour, sugar and coffee, and for calico prints and dyes, and gradually a demand for these articles was established. The men looked after their herds of horses and took very good care of the few cattle that drifted into the reservation; the women attended to their domestic duties and, with the aid of the children, took care of the sheep and goats, which, ac cording to long-established custom, belonged exclusively to them. Agriculture was practically unknown...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

The Indian Advocate. 324 under the new conditions, and, in fact, pronounced variations ' v. are already apparent. Up to ten years ago there was so little vv change that it might be said that there was none; since then the difference can be seen by everyone. Should the price of - wool rise in the near future the change that has been suggested I . , might be checked, but it has received such an impetus that the Navaho will always henceforth pay much more attention , to horticulture than they have in the past, and this means necessarily a modification in the present methods of house L building. The average Navaho farm, and almost every adult male now has a small garden patch, comprises less than half an acre, while two acres is considered a large area to be &T ' - worked by one family at one time. One result of this industrial development of the people is an increased permanency of dwellings. As the flocks of sheep and goats diminish and their care becomes less import- . - ant, gre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

325 The Indian Advocate. flii)m)iiiiiiniiiitt nimnuMMHiiiKttmt AMERICAN SAVAGES THAT T i T ARE FIRE WORSHIPERS, j --...--j -- , Some of the methods still pursued by savage races at the opening of the twentieth century for producing fire are very interesting. The Zuni Indians of North America use an agave stick with sand to help the friction. In the National Museum at Washington is a collection of objects illustrative of fire wor ship on the American continent. One article is a sort' of fire pump, utilized by the Onondagas at the feast of the White Dog, at which a white dog is sacrificed. This tool utilizes the mechanism of the pump drill for making the point of a stick revolve rapidly in another piece of wood, thus obtaining ignition. It resembles the apparatus in vogue "among the Australian blacks. The Hindus, by the way, have a similar sacred fire drill, by means of which they make fire nine times each day for nine days at a periodical festival. The Hupa Indians, of California, ar...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

Tin: Indian Advocate. 326 The ceremony always takes place at night, and the effect of it -is both weird and impressive. Just when the fire is raging at its hottest a whistle is heard from the outer darkness, and a dozen warriors, lithe and lean, dressed in narrow white breeGh cloth and moccasins, "daubed with white earth, so as to look like so many living statues, come bounding through the entrance of the corral that en closes the flaming heap. Yelping like wolves, they move to ward the fire, bearing aloft slender wands tipped with balls of eagle down. Running down the fire, always to the left, they begin thrusting their wands toward the fire to burn off the down from the tips. This done, another performance follows. It is heralded by a tremendous blowing of horns. Ten or more men run into the corral, each of them carrying two thick bundles of shredded cedar bark. Four times they run around the fire, waving the bundles, which are then lighted. Now begins a wild race around the fire,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 November 1901

327 Th. Indian Advocate. i ....-, AN INDIAN CEREMONY, 1 : Few, if any, of the writers on the habits, folklore and history of the American Indian have devoted any space to the red man's Turkish bath, an institution home-made, to be sure, but a recognized necessity in every camp and a feature of the daily life of the Indian. On the contrary, commentators have conveyed the impression that habits of cleanliness are foreign to the Indian, and that he has an inborn aversion to water except for culinary purposes. By the avidity and frequency with which the Indian in dulges in his home-made Turkish bath he proves the fallacy of this belief and shows that he, as well as his white brother, can live up to the precept, "Cleanliness is next to godliness," only in the practice the Indian puts cleanliness first. The term Turkish bath is unknown to the Indian. He calls that method of ablution a "medicine sweat." It is to him a rite both physical and spiritual, for he cleanses his per son and then "...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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