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Elephind.com contains 1,746 items from Grange Advance, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 5 July 1876

**^iSOTll¥ir*S131S*j^ From ratgncU's Majfen^nc. j& My? story! My life* Oh\ it Has been uneventful too simple in its in cidents. I could tell you th*e sorrows of others, but my own—well, well! as you will. You shall hear, %het wound, has never healed, and if I put my hand above it, the place still throbs, even as it will beat and ache'till kindly nature says to me, "Sleep, poor weary one, and rest." And then peacefully, trust ingly, and with a simple hope of for giveness, may I sleep that long sleep which they say so flippantly has no waking, but which has a waking, as every lesson which we learn in life persists'in teaching us. You will smile, perhaps, when I tell you that I was once what people called pretty—that this pale-hued face was once plumpy and rosy, these sad eyes bright, and this gray scant hair golden brown, long, and flowing. But why sjftpultr I think you would smile Do I n§t know that you must have seen the, gfty*young plant putting out its tender leaves |n spring,...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 5 July 1876

E W A I W FOR A*T ANSWER. From CashfU's Magazine. My story? My life? Oh, it has been uneventful too simple in its in cidents. I could tell you the sorrows of others, but my own—well, well! as you will. You shall hear. The wound has never healed, and if 1 put my hand above it, the place still throbs, even as it will beat and ache till kindly nature says to me, "Sleep, poor weary one, and rest." And then peacefully, trust ingly, and with a simple hope of for giveness, may I sleep that long sleep which they say so flippantly has no waking, but which has a waking, as every lesson which we learn in life persists in teaching us. You will smile, perhaps, when I tell you that I was once what people called pretty—that this pale-huerl face was once plumpy and rosy, these sad eyes bright, and this gray scant hair golden brown, long, and flowing. But why should I think you would smile Do I not know that you must have seen the gay young plant putting out its tender leaves in spring, growing gree...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 5 July 1876

Baflroad Time Tablt. The trains on the C. M. and St. Taul railroad depart from the Red Wing depot an follows: GOING BAST: Freight at 2:40 a. m. Passten'r 12.10 p. m. at 8:25a.m. 9:27p.m. 1 [GOING WEST Freight at 12:20 a, m. Pnsseng'r 4:15 a. m* at 5-15 pi in. 3:40 p. m. Chicago and North-Western Eail way. Time of departure of Passenger Trains from Winona, in effect January^ 1876: Leave for Chicago and the East,' 4:50 p. in. Leave for Chicago and the West, 12:20 p. us. The Fourth of July Celebration. The Fourth of July celebration yes terday was a grand affair in most re spects, though not carried out success fully in all its details. The programme 'was not prepared and published in time to be fully understood by the people, and there were not enough active young men and enterprising go-aheadative ladies on any of the committees to man age as ought to have been managed. The truth might as well be told now as hereafter, and while it cannot be denied that everything was not as everybod...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

VOL. III. Terms of Subscription, Single Copy, per year $2 00 Fire Copies to one address 8 75 Ten 15 00 fL^* Subscriptions must be paid in advance in all cases. ADVERTISING RATES. 1 column, 1 year, $140,1 month. $25 85. 50, 35, 25, 16, 16 10 6 4 3 Si 1-16 1 inch Special notices in editorial columns, 15 cents per line, for first insertion, and after, wards, in special notice column, at 5c per line. tt The date following the name iu the ad dress is the time of the commencement of the subscription not paid for. Letter of Acceptance. Mr. Hayes letter of acceptance is published in the Dispatch of Mon day, and will probably appear in this week's ADVANCE. It is an ably prepared document, giving a clear expression of the views of the writ er, and, at the same time, is modest and unassuming. It bears the finger-marks of Mr. Hayes alone, and furnishes a satisfactory contra diction to the reports which have been industriously circulated, that it was to be written or dictated by politicians. The...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

SONG OF 1876. BY BAYARD TAYLOR. Waken, voice of the Land's Devotion! Spirit of freedom, awaken all! Ring, ye shores, to the Song of OcejtiL Rivers, answer, and mountains, call! The golden day has come: &t<--*« Let every tongue be dumb 5 That sounded its malice ormurmured its fears She hath won her story She wears her glory1 "^, We crown her the Land of a Hundred Y$arsl Out of darkness and toil and danger Into the light of Victory's day— Help to the weak and Home to the,Stranger, Freedom to all, she hath hehHug£way! Now Europe's orphans res^v" Upon her mother-breast. 3?l The voices of nations are heard in That shall last upon her ^W,T#1 New love and honor, A ®F And crownherthe Queen of a hundredYears North and South, we are met as brothers the ©he East and West, we are wedded as one! Right of each shall secure our mother's— Child of each is her faithlul son We give thee heart and hand, Our glorious native land. For battle has tried thee, and time endears We will write thy stor...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

SOXG OF 1876. BY BAYARD TAYLOR. Waken, voice oi the Land's Devotion! Spirit oi freedom, awaken all! Ring, ye shores, to the Song of Ocean. Rivers, answer, and mountains, call! The golden day has come: Let every tongue be dumb That sounded its malice or murmured its tears She hath won her story She wears her glory We crown her the Land of a Hundred Years! Out of darkness and toil and danger Into the light of Victory's a Help to the weak and Home to the stranger, Freedom to all, she hath held her way! Now Europe's orphans rest Upon her mo'her-breast. The voices of nations are heard in the cheers That shall last upon her New love and honor, And crown her the Queen of a hundred Years! North and South, we are met as brothers East and West, we are wedded as one! Right ot each shall secure our mother's— Child of each is her faithlnl son We give thee heart and hand, Our glorious native land, For battle has tried thee, and time endears We will write thy story, And keep thy glory As pure as o...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

jNOfODY! Left there nobody's1 daughter, Child of disgrace and shame,— Nobody ever taught her A mother's sweet, saving name. Nobody ever caring Whether she stood or fell, And men (are they men ensnaring With the arts and the gold of hell! Stitching with ceaseless labor, To earn her pitiful bread Begging a crust of a neighbor, And getting a curse instead! All through the long, hot summer, All through the cold, dark time. With fingers that numb and number wow white as the frost's white rime. Nobody ever conceiving The throb of that warm, young life, Nobody ever believing The strain of that terrible strife! Nobody kind words pouring In that orphan heart's sad ear. But all of us ignoring What lies at oar doors, so near! O sister! down in the alley Pale, with the downcast eye, Dark and drear is the valley, But the stars shine forth on high. Nobody here may love thee, Or care it thou stand or fall. But the great, good God above thee, He watches and cares for all. I A A E A N E From "Ueber ...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

NOBODY! Left there nobody's daughter, Child of disgrace and shame,— Nobody ever taught her A mother's sweet, saving name. Nobody ever caring Whether she stood or fell, And men (are they men ensnaring With the arts and the gold of hell! Stitching with ceaseless labor, To earn her pitiful bread Begging a crust ot a neighbor, And getting a cursp instead All through the long, hot summer, All through the cold, dark time, With fingers that numb and number Grow white as the frost's white rime. Nobody ever conceiving The throb of that warm, young life, Nobody ever believing The strain of that terrible strife! Nobody kind words pouring In that 01 plian heart's sad ear. But all ot tm ignoring What lies at oar doors, so near' O sister! down in the alley Pale, with the downcast eye, Dark and drear is the valley, But the stars shine forth on high. Nobody here may love thee, Or rare il thou stand or fall. But the great, good God above thee, He watches and cares for all. A A E A N E From "ITcber L...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

TBS GfiANOB ADVANCE. WEDNESDAY. JULY 12,1876. H. II. YOUNG, Publisher Editor. Political Nominations. REPUBLICAN.. For President:—YL. B. HAYES, of Ohio. For Vice resident :—Wx. A. WHEE LER, of New York. DEMOCRATIC. For President:--SAMUEL J. TIL DEN, of New York. For Vice Preafctetf:—THOMAS A. HENDRICKS, of Indiana. INDEPENDENT. For President:— PETER COOPER, of New York. For Vice President NEWTON K. BOOTH, of California. REFORM. For President: GREEN CLAY SMITH, of Kentucky. For Vice President:—GIDEON T. STEWART, of Pennsylvania. A Grave Mistake. The true representative and embodi ment of this issue is Samuel J. Tilden, of New York, he who made himself a national reputation in his successful struggle with the villianous Tweed ring of his State. composed equally of Democrats and Republicans, Mr. Tilden having become the chairman of the State Central Com mittee, bis hostility to the scoundrels at once assumed shape, and summoning to his aid the force of public and party opinion, he secur...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

The Original Jewish and Chris tian Sabbath. Sabbatarians of every ordgr, and even most of those who claim Sunday as the Christian Sabbath, either assume or allow, without any evidence, that Satur day answers to the original Sabbath of Genesis ii.2, 3. They infer, because the Jews in the Mosaic law were re quired to keep ''the seventh day" which was given for their Sabbath, that it corresponded to the weekly seventh fay" which was given to Adam. But this is an inference, not only without evidence, but against it. For the Jews unto whom were committed the ora cles of God," have, by their adjustment of the calender of the Bible, testified that the first week of Genesis began on Monday, and ended on Sunday. Whatever the prejudices of the more ignorant of the Jews may be in favor of Saturday, as answering to the orig inal Sabbath, the fact is, their most learned rabbins have clearly taught that the first Sabbath answered to our Sun day. This will be evident to any one who will examine th...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

The Grange Advance t£. YOUNG, EDITOR A & O REDWING. MINNESOTA TIMELY TOPICS. Lieutenant Cameron, the African traveler, enjoyed a luxury permitted to few men. On his last trip he didn't see a newspaper for three years. The leading English medical jour nals say that in spite of the certificates of nineteen physicians, the indications are that the late Sultan was murdered. The roughs of San Francisco having inaugurated war on the Chinese by, cutting off their pig-tails, have proved themselves no more nor less than queue klux. "Fifteen cents per day is what some of the Black Hills miners make." Ana that too, in digging gold. Why, they could do better than that at home dig ging potatoes. The New Sultan of Turkey would like to ex-Sultan over the overthrow of the Turkish Empire at any ra£e he' is talking of abdicating before the downfall takes place. Mr. Abagail Warren, of Cincinnati, and eighty years of age, predicted sev en years ago that governor Hayes would be a candidate for presi...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

The Grange Advance tl. YOUNG, EDITOR AND PROP'S. REDWING. MINNESOTA TIMELY TOPICS. Lieutenant Cameron, the African traveler, enjoyed a luxury permitted to few men On his last trip he didn't see a newspaper for three years. The leading English medical jour nals say that in spite of the certificates of nineteen physicians, the indications arc that the late Sultan was murdered. The roughs of San Francisco having inaugurated war on the Chinese by cutting off their pig-tails, have proved themselves no more nor less than queue klux. "Fifteen cents per day is what some of the Black Hills miners a Ana that too, in digging gold. Why they could do better than that at home dig ging potatoes. The New Sultan of Turkey would like to ex-Sultan over the overthrow of the Turkish Empire at any rate he is talking of abdicating before the downfall takes place. Mr. Abagail Warren, of Cincinnati, and eighty years of age, predicted sev en yeais ago that governor Hayes would be a candidate for president in...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

HIS MESSENGER. Hajorie with the waiting lace, Majorie with the pale-brown hair. She sits and sews in the silent place, She counts the steps on the outer stair. Two, three, four—they pass her door, The patient face droops low again Still it is as it was before— Oh! will he come indeed no more, And are her prayers all prayers in vain Through the warm and the winter night, Majorie with the wistful eyes. She keeps her lonely lamp alight Until the stars are dim in the skies. Through the gray and the shining day Her palid fingers, swift and slim, Set their stitches, nor one astray, Though her heart it is tar away Over the summer seas with him. Over the distant summer seas Majorie's yearning fancies Uy She feels the kiss ol the island breeze, She sees the blue of the tropic sky. Does she know, as they come and go, Those waves that lap the island shore, That under their ceaseless ebb and flow Golden locksfloatto and fro— Tangled locks she will comb no more? Many a hopeless hope she keeps, M...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 12 July 1876

4 -i-R Eailroad Time Table. The trains on the C. M. and St. Paul railroad depart from the Red Wing depot as follows: GOING BAST: Freight at 2:40 a. m. Passsen'r 12:10 p. m. at 8:25 a.m. 9:27 p. in. [GOING WEST: Freight at 12:20 a. in, Passeng'r 4:15 a. in. at 515 p.m. 3:40p.m. and North-Western Sail way. Chicag: Time of departure of Passenger Trains from Winona, in effect January, 1876: Leave tor Chicago and the East, 4:50 p. m. Leave for Chicago and the West, 12:20 p. m. WHALE OIL at Poole's Drug Store. READ Fieldby & Ellingson's adver tisement in another column. MEALS furnished at all hours at Turn ers' Opera Hall Restaurant. Come in and get a good dinner. tf DIED, in this city, on the 6th inst., at the residence of his mother Mr. ¥m. Lawrence, aged 20 years. MESSRS. WM. HA YUAN, senior and junior, arrived home on Saturday from their visit to the Centennial exposition. FISHING parties to Pierce county, Wis., are the order of the day now. There are two out from Red Wing this we...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 19 July 1876

VOL. III. Centennial Letter. For the ADVANCE. BRISTOL, Pa., July 12th, 1876. From this quiet town of 4,000 in habitants, there are several ways to reach its greater but younger neigh bor, Philadelphia. The oldest in habitants can remember when the covered wagon served for a car and the sloop for a steamboat but now several fine steamers plough the waters of the Delaware, while by the Pennsylvania Railroad one can go direct to the Centennial in less than an hour. The scenery along the Delaware is very fine, and as from the steam er one sees beautiful country-seats, and little, thickly-shaded villages which have sprung up, not as most western towns do, for business in terests, but that people weary of the dust and bustle of city life may get away from business and-its wea risome accompaniments he can scarcely realize| that but two cen turies ago the Indians occupied these lands and all westward to the Pacific. Looking out upon the blue water and the green woods and thinking of the mig...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 19 July 1876

OX THE RHINE. Oh I those days so fall of dreaming, When we floated down the river And the sunlight in its streaming, Kissed your nair with gleam and quiver. Whnn you trailed your snowy fingers, Thro' the waves with girlish pleasure And the songs of distant singers, Came to us in rhythmic measure. Oh! those nights of starry splendor— When the vesper bell's sweet tolling From the village, sweet and tender, Came across the Rhine's blue rolling. When our light barge idly drifted, Wafted by the wind's caresses And the fair moon brightly silted All its glory on your tresses. Oh 1 my lily-throatd maiden With your yellow hair down falling— And your drooping eyes love-laden. All my fiery soul enthralling. How those days of love's first glory Come again before my vision!— Of the river old in story, Where we felt a joy elysian. Ah! those days are gone forever— Dust and ashes allyour sweetness And those hours npon the river But a dream of full completeness. Yet the world lacks all its sadness. ...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 19 July 1876

ON THE RHINE. Oh! those days so full of dreaming, When wefloateddown the river And the sunlight in its streaming, Kissed your liair with gleam and quiver. When you trailed your snowy fingers, Thro' the waves with girlish pleasure And the songs of distant singers, Came to us in rhythmic measure. Oh those nights of starry splendor— When the vesper bell's\sweet tolling From the village, sweet and tender, Came across the Rhine's blue rolling. When our light barge idly drifted, Wafted by the wind's caresses And the fair moon brightly silted All its glory on your tresses. Oh my lily-throatd maiden With your yellow hair down falling— And your drooping eyes love-laden All my fiery soul enthralling. How those days of love's first glory Come again'belore my vision!— 01 the river old in story, Where we lelt a joy elysiau. Ah those days are gone forever— Dust and ashes alt your sweetness And those hours upon the river But a dream ol full completeness. Yet the world lacks all its sadness, When m...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 19 July 1876

mum HAT^ES? XiETTF^ A. Howard, Hon. Joseph H. Rainey and others, Committee of the Republican Na tional Convention: GENTLEMEN -In reply to your official communication of June 17th, by which I am informed of my nomination for the office of President of tty United States by the national republican con vention at Cincinnati, I accept the nomination with gratitude, hoping that, under Providence, I shall be able, if elected, to execute the duties of the high office as a trust for the benefit of all the people. I do not deem it ne cessary to enter upon any extended examination of the declaration of principles made by the convention. The resolutions are in accord with my views, and I heartily concur in the principles they announce. In several of the resolutions, however, questions are considered which are of such im portance that I deem it proper to brief ly express my convictions in regard to them. CIVIL SERVICE REFORM. The fifth resolution adopted by the convention is of paramount interes...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 19 July 1876

A E S JLiETTFB Ketorni, tioumptioii, Pacification, Free Schools oiul but One Term. COLCMBUS, 0., July 8. To the Hon. Edward McPherson, Hon. Wm. A. Howard, Hon. Joseph H. Rainey and others, Committee ot the Republican Na tional Convention: Grvn.iMi N—In reply to your official communication of June 17th, by which I am informed of my nomination for the office of President of the United States by the national republican con vention at Cincinnati. 1 accept the nomination with gratitude, hoping that, under Providence, I shall be able, if elected, to execute the duties of the hisjh office as a trust for the benefit of all the people. I do not deem it ne cessary to inter upon any extended examination of the declaration of principles made by the convention. The resolutions are in accord with my views, and 1 heartily concur in the prim iples they announce. In several of the resolutions, however, questions are considered which are of such im portance that deem it proper to brief ly express my ...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Grange advance. — 19 July 1876

THE 3BANGE ADVANOS. WEDNESDAY. JULY 19,1876. H. H. YOUNG, Publisher & Editor. What is Government for It has been a subject of consider- able discussion for several days past, as to what is the duty of a city gov- ernment. A hole is left open in the sidewalk of a principal street, and a citizen tumbles into it after dark, and receives .severe injury. Who is responsible One party main- tains that the owner of the property is responsible, and that the injured man must look to him for redress. Another tells us that the contractor having the work in charge is the party accountable. So, too, in the matter of cattle running at large. When the police are notified that the ordinance forbidding the run- ning at large of cattle, horses, etc., is being violated, instead of taking it upon themselves to enforce obed- ience to the law, they inform the complaining citizen that he may have the cattle driven to the pound and impounded, or go before a mag- istrate and make complaint, that it is no...

Publication Title: Grange Advance, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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