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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

of (he draft horse. An arm wide at its junction with the shoulder render ed so by full development of muscles on the rear and anterior portions of the arm should always be sought, for the opposite formation is always at tended by want of precision, power and activity in the movement of the fore legs. In selecting a horse for any other purpose than a draft a very wide breast should be avoided, for in most cases a horse with this formation will paddle when he trots. Live Stock Influence Production. The Farmer of St. Paul calls atten tion to the fact that there is a close relation between live stock and the value of farm lands and of farm pro fluction. A comparison of the statis 1 tics of different groups of states, as given by the last national census, shows that in a group in which the average value of live stock per acre on the farms was $2.04 per acre, the value of all farm property, including land, was $12.48 per acre, whereas in the states in which the average value of live stock...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

16 'HHHBflflUßßßfli BS9B I I S THE guiding star B BliJlwß ' tllat steers the |hUk9 Dairy Interest in the BgsEgM right direction to prop ii^H 1 er and correct methods HB^ IBHIB ■ m A in Dairy Practiceand cJ^mt ■ iir Prl ft I*l II iiiiiT IHI Ilia public opinion has de~ 8 BBS k VIpAIII HI liHT KISBBHB cided that the Sharpies If I) PI ■■ 1 MKLIIbm' 1 -ill VM Tubular Separator is Hi IB H II BJ ft*** ft 1» BL BiEfflßii the correct separator JH jSv *» Sfl 10 "^"^ niiiiiiHHmyrtf Hr M v IMMttSiSgalMi irom every possible 4*mr / in"ifll^B Tr ~nwTni Sill I KiS SH p°int of view- X^ / iniiiiiliTfTFfJilrM yI H 111 IB I Ik PIBBBBBISI CORRECT because V^jgrf^JTl lAh I 111 Jj I k B |l| Wk wSHSiUtBSm tne crank turns twenty ■^ffffifl^^^fil jH dI I ■iB iv its H9 1 jhj lal I jM Per cent easier an t^ie i>^^^^^^j^^^^gaJLß_ | Btjj'm-f^^"M^^Bß^^^^^W^^fc^^Bt^^M^B^^S^^B^HH^hßßß^^Bß^Bßß^B^B^B^^^^^^a^^^^^fe^^ft^Aw crank of an other sep ||^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^a^^^i^^«ag^H^|^^Kßf|^^^|^^^^^ arator made. - CORRECT beca...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

THE RANCH VOL. XXII. NO. 21. * PROFIT AND LOSS IN FRUIT SHIPPING * ACCORDING to President Bryan, of the Washington State College, at Pullman, there is nothing that retards the development of the fruit industry more than the lack of ade quate organization, both at local points and in the markets in the east and west. The individual fruit grower cannot possibly know the varying con ditions of the different markets, and when he sends a shipment to what he considers a good market he is at the mercy of the dealers. With an orga nization of the growers in each sec tion of country a man could be kept at the markets, whose duty it would be to look after the interests solely of the organization that appointed him and sent him there, advising the mem bers of the demands of the market, what prices prevailed, when to ship 1, etc. More perfect organization than is to be found at present would lead not only to the fruit being in better condition, but would also lead to its shipment to the proper ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

2 Logged-Off Lands in the West End. This is a subject but little under stood by the vast army of people in the east who look westward with a longing to locate somewhere on Puget Sound. To them the term "logged-off lands" is one to conjure with, and few of them can have a proper idea of what these lands are until they come out themselves and investigate. Throughout the length and breadth of the section of the state lying west of the Cascade range there may be found section upon section of the most fertile land to be found anywhere, which only needs the clearing of stumps to be put under the plow and yield heavy and profitable crops. Log ged-off lands are both hilly and valley lands which have been denuded of their merchantable timber by the log ging companies. When once this tim ber is removed the lands are in many cases placed on the market at low PRACTICALLY A HOMESTEAD if/Vipe^r" I OUR PROPOSITION ;W\ u> On Western Washington Farming v / i Land Tracts Amounts to Free Land. \J^ ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Colman Building, Seattle. MILLER FREEMAN, Editor and Proprietor Associate editors F. WALDEN, H. L. BL.ANCHARD MRS. S. G. WEBSTER. XHued the First and Fifteenth of Month Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to so licit subscriptions. Good commissions and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES There are some lessons to be de rived from the Lewis and Clark fair that are worthy of a place here. It was a wonderful eye opener to the thousands who came from the east. It is hard to understand any country from a mere description but this is especially so of the Pacific coast. The reason for this is owing to the fact that this great stretch of country, reaching from Southern California to a point well up into British Columbia, is so dissimilar to the far east or the middle west to be found in the Missis sippi valley. The writer has tried in the years gone by to make inquiring friends understand this country, but is so impressed with his failure that he no longer attempts anything of the kind, but says to one and all: "Come and see." The cheap rates, coupled with the attractions of the fair, brought out thousands, and they have seen. It is true that what we can usually see from a railroad train in passing through the country is a poor portrayal of what the co...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

ties above named. We had no Jona thans in cold storage and consequent ly can not report on that variety, but it is claimed for it that it behaves very well when kept in this way. One thing we noticed that is worth remem bering, and that is that some apples re tain their flavor better when kept a long time than others do. The Spitz deteriorates badly and after mid-sum mer is almost tasteless. The Arkan sas Black, Rome Beauty, Ben Davis and Winesap did not greatly lose flavor even to the middle of October. * * ♦ As predicted in the last issue apples are very high. J. B. Powles & Co., of Seattle, are selling some of our Jona thans at $2.25 per box. That will net us close to $2.00 at home. Last year we sold our Jonathans at $1.00 per box. Those who have good orchards in the northwest will occasionally find themselves with a big crop and prices high, as we did in 1901, and then the business will pay immensely. * * * W. W. Clark, of Billings, Mont., who was referred to in the last iss...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

ft HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. Q. WEBSTER Semi communication* for this depart mt'iil to Mr*. S. G. Webster, 259 Colman block, Seattle, or direct to The Ranch. All question! will be carefully answered. Contributions for publication welcome. The Ranch would like from its wo man readers a few article! on "How to Spend Christmas on The Farm." These are to be published in our issue for Dcjpember first, and should be not longer than 250 words each. A Good Bank Account. The best bank account any one caii have is having one's word absolutely reliable. A young man was talking to me once about starting out in life — and how serious the prospect looked without any capital. "Why, my clear young man," I said, "every man can't start with a fortune! Just make your word good. When you say you will do a thing, do it. When you agree to meet a person at a certain hour —be there. If other people break their word, that's their affair —keep your part of the bargain." The first man who gives you a job will recogniz...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

PROTECTING THE YOUNG TREES. Sunscald. rabbits and borers are the greatest enemies of orchard trees the first few years after planting. I" some sections of (he west rabbits are only troublesome at times of heavy snow fall. In other districts they attack the bark of young trees at all seasons of the year when a scarcity of other green stuff exists—a condition which is not so apparent this year with so much succulent verdure everywhere. Borers more frequently attack trees of feeble growth or those with bark injured by sunscald. Wrapping with heavy paper is the most economical protection from rabbits and it is equal ly effective in warding off sunshine and borers. A good grade of hard ware wrapping paper can be pur chased, cut to convenient size for the young trees and the whole cost of pa per and wrapping will not exceed one cent a tree. For trees averaging one inch caliper the strips of paper should be six by twenty-four inches. The spiral form of wrapping is usually practiced. The lo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

8 THE DAIRY Septic Tank for Creamery Sewage. (Prof. Farrington.) Tin> drainage from a creamery may be divided into two parts: Ist, the well water, which is pumped tor the purpose of cooling cream and is not contaminated by any filth, and 2nd. the drainage from the factory during the time the mil* utensils, churns, vats, etc.. are being cleaned. This drainage will contain considerable milk and grease, and if it is allowed to accumulate, in any place, decomposi tion soon sets in. and it usually be comes a nuisance. On account of the fact that most creameries have these two kinds of sewage, the polluted and non-polluted, it seems desirable that a factory should have the drain pipe or the creamery so constructed that the drainage may be conducted in two different directions. An easily manipu lated gate can be placed in the drain where it leaves the creamery so that the well water that has been used for cooling simply, may be carried off in one direction and the drainage con taining m...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

the other hand, through the energetic efforts of creameries and sellers of cream separators, a great many farm ers are now selling two or three times as much butter or butter fat as former ly. Calves get less whole milk and cows are better cared for. Until re cently the increase in available butter fat per cow brought about a total in crease in butter production which par alleled the growth in demand. Within a year or two this does not appear to be longer the case. The great increase in city population and the increased use per person of whole milk, of cream and of ice cream have materially re tarded the rate of increase in the pro duction of butter. Milk condensaries have also had some effect in this di rection and driven a number of cream eries out of business. Natural condi tions on the Pacific coast are such that the population of the cities will con tinue to increase more rapidly than that of the farming districts. A few years ago it appeared probable that the time was almost a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

10 POULTRY ——— ll L. BLANCHARD ■ Communications for this department ar« solicited. Personal experiences de tailed and questions prove of great ben efit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Had lock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Se attle. The Fowls for Puget Sound. (H. L. Blanchard.) O. R. M., a Seattle reader, writes me as follows: " "Will you kindly tell me what kind of chickens you con sider the best adapted to the Puget Sound climate? Also state next best kind." The above enquiry is made more frequently than any other, concerning the poultry business, and it is not so easily answered as it would at first appear. As all know, the numerous varieties and breeds of poultry repre sent nearly all, if not all, of the shades and colors known, which is a very fortunate thing, since we may agree upon all other points, and still it takes the variety of colors to go round and satisfy all. But eliminating the ques tion of color altogether and judging from our own experience and the pub lished recor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

What Copper Investment Means We call the attention of our readers to the advertisement of the Seattle- Boston Copper Company, appearing for the first time in this issue. The men at the head of this company are well known in our city, Charles E. Crane having been for years the mana ger and principal owner of the Dia mond Ice & Storage Company and the Mutual Light and Heat Company. Dr. Churchill is a physician of seventeen years' practice in Seattle and a very successful business man. P. A. Sut phen and M. B. Crane are of the well known firm of M. B. Crane & Co., Inc. With these gentlemen is associated A. M. Brooks, manager of the Pacific Coast Biscuit Company. None of these gentlemen would allow their names to be connected with any proposition which was not guilt-edge and would bear every investigation. They have incorporated this company for the pur pose of developing copper properties in King and adjoining counties, which are deserving of their assistance, and they propose ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

12 THE FIELD Importance of Draining Wet Land. (H. L. Blanchard.) The business of farming is very closely allied with the subjects of ir rigation and drainage. Tne up-to-date farmer necessarily becomes a student of both. In proportion as he under stands both subjects and the relation they bear to each other, will he gath er from his farming operations both pleasure and profit. There are two kinds of irrigation and drainage— natural and artificial. Irrigation con sists in supplying the required moist ure to the soil for the nourishment oi plants. This is done by the natural rainfall, or by conveying the water upon the land commonly through ditches made for the purpose. Under either method at times there becomes an excess of such moisture for the welfare of plants, which it not removed from the soil proves disas trous to plant lite or causes a teeble growth of same. The best and most profitable farming demands that suit able provision be made for the escape or the removal from tne soil...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

mercial fertilizers mix the different elements in just the right proportion for different crops, taking into consid eration the section of the country in which the fertilizer is to be used, as the nature of the soil differs in dif ferent sections. Barnyard manures and the plowing under of leguminous crops are excellent methods for en riching the soil, but in many cases the proportion of the three elements in the manure is not right for the par ticular soils to which they are applied. Legumes have a very large proportion of nitrogen, and if the soil happens to need the other elements more the ap plication of too much nitrogen through the plowing under of legumes has a tendency to do it harm, i^ocal con ditions and the composition of the soil, and taking into account the par ticular crop to be planted, should gov ern in all cases where the selection of a fertilizer is to be made. Advantages of Fall Planting. The experience of recent years has caused me to change my opinion to some ext...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

14 LIVE STOCK "Evident Effects' of Inbreeding. Every rancher who has had experi ence with raising stock year after year knows that inbreeding causes the quality of the herd to deteriorate. For this reason all progressive breed ers dispose of the head of their herd after using him for a certain length of time, and procure another to take his place. There are numerous un toward results attributed to the prac tice of inbreeding that are evidently due quite as much to the effects of en vironment as to those of consanguin ity. One breeder has asserted that "it is quite within the range of prob ability that unrelated animals, kept for years under precisely similar con ditions, would develop similar weak nesses," and it is clear that these sim ilar weaknesses would be intensified in the progeny of such animals irre spective of the parents. This matter of deterioration of qual ity of which we are speaking relates to animals, but the same thing is to be found in all classes of seeds, too. Th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

breeders made this complaint, but it is believed the fair commissioners will decide to give the cup to Mr. Splawn. In caring for the flock I prefer green pasture for them as many months in the year as possible. Blue grass makes the best permanent pasture. Dwarf Essex rape can be sown as soon as the ground will work in the spring, and if sown alone five or six pounds of seed will be required per acre. Six or eight weeks after sowing it will be ready for pasture, which will last until freez ing weather. A smaller amount of rape can be sown with oats, and after the oats crop is removed I have an ex cellent fall pasture. Sheep like rape, but I would not advise any one to keep them on rape alone. They should have plenty of pure water at all times of the year. Wide-bottomed troughs are more sat isfactory for sheep feeding than the V-shaped trough, because the feed can not be eaten so rapidly. The troughs should stand about one foot from the ground, with strong legs spread out ward at the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 November 1905

16 Don't "Sag Down" 4sH^ i\ N THE Dairying Proposition, for you must remember that your gain by using a TUBULAR SEPA fi||i I I RATOR is at least ten per cent, over the gravity creamers under the best possible conditions of cold %J£^L water or ice. If unfavorable conditions, such as lack of ice, etc., your gain by using a Tubular Sep /^f}^^\\\h arator will be twenty per cent, over the old method. l\Ml(mWlwJ\ ® n tne <lues*^on °f Quality of cream or butter, we guarantee that everyone will notice a great im- lfe» provement in quality, equivalent to three to five cents per pound by the use of the Tubular Separator, *, !^s^^^^ while a careless man will, by the aid of a TUBULAR, secure a butter worth from fifty per cent, to a l^th^MP/ hundred per cent, more than he would without. Hfffi# A The skim milk being fresh and warm is much better for stock food. It will be worth from twenty-five t |Sc|} Aju^ll cents to forty-five cents per hundred pounds for stock—and save much calf-sickness. S...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1905

■-• • • • VOL. XXII. NO. 22. NOW HE STARTED 11. L VAN DEMAN In September, 1866, when in my twentieth year, I decided to follow fruit growing as a life work. As there were no agricultural colleges in this country then, where theoretical and practical instruction was afforded to young men desiring them, I concluded to hire myself to work on some well managed fruit farm, before going into business for myself. In October I at tended a fair near my father's home In southern Ohio and in seeking for in formation about fruits at the fruit hall I there had the good fortune to meet Dr. John A. Warder, who came to see the fruits of that region. This meet- ing had a lasting influence on my whole life thereafter. I took the liberty to tell him of my recent decision and he at once display ed an interest and deep sympathy, such as is usually characteristic of great men. A few days afterward I wrote to him for advice as to where I might find a place to work and learn how to grow fruits. He directed...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1905

2 cnn be begun as soon as the land is Cleared, so one can form a correct idea of the various conditions to be considered. One ought not to bfl blinded with the fallacy that a single ditch that may convey the surface 1 water across bis farm will be suffi cient. Such does not constitute drain age in its true sense —Gnly in a super ficial sense. Brery farm has conditions peculiar ly its own regarding this matter of drainage. In deciding as to how best to proceed in order to drain a Riven acre one must first decide as to the source of the excessive moisture. Sometimes it will be found to be the surface water that naturally finds its way into a depression which receives the natural surface drainage from over quite a large area immediately around. When the subsoil of such depression happens to be a tenacious clay, the water failing to find an out PRACTICALLY A HOMESTEAD, Illlj^p,—» - I OUR PROPOSITION SKw^i^viX On Western Washington Farming v( 1 ■ Laild TraCtS Amounts tO Free Land. F^^^^^...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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