ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Mountain Laurel Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,606 results
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 THE VIEW FROM THE CONCORD TREE EDITORS NOTE: This month we are delighted to once again feature more of John Yeatts wonderful stories. He has been devoting his time in recent months to his new book of mountain recollections which will be published next spring. We'll let you know as soon as it's available. We called it the Concord Tree, but it was actually a big pippin apple tree that reached nearly 50 feet into the clean air at the edge of my father's orchard in Old Mayberry. So entwined were its branches with 2 healthy Concord grape vines that it gave the appearance of a living arbor whose sole purpose was to support the vines and six or eight Yeatts children and their guests who climbed and clamored among its branches, gorging themselves on the sweet and succulent fruit that ripened late in August and lasted until the school bell in October called us back to the little grey school house that stood near the present Mayberry Presbyterian Church. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

THE OLD JOE MEADOWS STORE BY: OLYER TURNER ©1986 '> * ' I W '* % *"'< * f I know of very few still living that traded at this store as children so many years ago. I carried eggs, butter, dried apples and dried blackberries there to sell to Mr. Joe Meadows from the time I was about five years old. I bought dress goods and many other things there until I moved. I don't remember what year he passed on, but it has been many, many years ago. The store was still standing the last time I passed, but it was going down. It is on road 605 [in Franklin County, Virginia], near the bridge. The store had a big loft where Mr. Meadows poured the dried fruits and oh, what a big pile he had. Many people sold their dried fruit there. Mr. Meadows weighed the fruit and paid by the pound. He had sheets spread out to put the fruit on. Many times I sat by the fireplace in the back and talked to Mr. Meadows on a cold day when Granny would send me to the store with some eggs or walnut k...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 TOBACCO TIME IN JOHN HAYES HOLLOW Today I was reminded of tobacco priming time in the John Hayes Hollow, and what a dreaded time that was. Even though that was many years ago, I can see that small tobacco field on the hillside, the leaves next to the ground turning a bright yellow. That's how we knew it was priming time. All those ieaves turning yellow had to be pulled off the stalk and piled in neat little bunches on the mule drawn sleads, hauled to the tobacco curing barn, strung on sticks and hung in the barn for curing. And this had to be done in one day. Why in the one day? Daddy explained that if we didn't get all the tobacco in the barn at the same time it would not cure properly and if it didn't cure right the buyers down in WinstonSalem wouldn't want his tobacco. I asked,"Why wouldn't it cure right?" Daddy said, "If we put part in and let it hang there over night without starting the fire it would get all wilty and some stick together, ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

THE MAYBERRY MUSIC MAN Like the legendary music man of River City, lowa, he came singing his way into the hearts and minds of the people of Mayberry early in 1922. At first he was just a "new hand" at Mr. Simon's tanyard. His wife Matilda, daughter Mary and baby grandson Norman quickly endeared themselves to the travelers along the MayberryBankstown road with their friendly smiles and conversation. They were city folks from Roanoke. Then the close neighbors began hearing Marshall Coleman singing as he toiled at his job of turning animal hides into leather. Several people commented that the "new hand" really had a voice, and the word was spread.. Before long Mr. Coleman was invited to lead the singing at Mayberry school house when the two Brethern preachers came from Floyd once each month to hold Sunday services. There wasn't an organ or a piano. But Mr. Coleman carried a pitch pipe in his vest pocket and he knew how to get the folks singing in tune and in unison and harmony. Then, s...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 When I was very young, I would visit my grandma Clifton that lived at Vesta, Virginia. She was a sweet and kind person. She never seemed to have much strength, but she puttered around and cooked some good old fashioned food. She had an old iron pot that hung in the chimney. Sometimes she would boil beans and sometimes it would be a piece of meat of some kind. She could make the best chicken dumplings right in that old iron pot. Grandma and Grandpa lived in an old log house that had a cook room and a bedroom downstairs and a bedroom upstairs. A few yards out, they had another house they called the big house. There were some rooms and a parlor. There were also some rooms up stairs. The big house stayed closed up unless they had company. When Mom and us children visited there, we were company and had to sleep in the big house. I was always afraid there would be spiders or mice in the house because of it being closed up all the time, but the beds a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

I spoke my first public recitation in the Parsons church at Christmas time. My piece was entitled "The Four Seasons," or "Don't you think that Winter is Pleasanter than All?" Enoch said that when he first recited (at a church in Illinois), he seemed to go heels over head - over and over. It was difficult in my ease. I just whirled around and around, as if at the center of a superspeed merry-go-around. The audience seemed to fade away for a while as I was speaking, and then returned just as I finished. After that, until I was about fifteen, I never missed a year reciting at Christmas, sometimes by myself, other times in plays or dialogues. The ministers' children were supposed to be shining examples to all the others in this respect, and although I showed no oratorical brillance in my appearance before the public, I knew that I had to try harder to uphold my family's reputation. Following the Christmas program, candy, contributed by the Sunday school, and presents from our parents we...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 The Mail Box Dear Mrs. Thigpen, I just received my September Issue of The Mountain Laurel, and, as usual, enjoyed every word of it. I was born on Fine Creek in Floyd County! As a child I went to the Salem Church, which we knew as Head of The River, thats featured in "Backroads." Enclosed is my check for $20.00 for "The Laurel Foundation." Also, a check for $2.75 for a copy of The Laurel Library, Collection # 11. In your Backroads article you mention a book by Dr. Amos D. Wood entitled "Floyd County A History of its People and Places." I have heard of this book before but have been unable to get a copy. Could you furnish me with information on how I can obtain a copy? I love your little publication and have every copy. Keep up the good work and God bless you all. Mrs. F. Augustson Virginia Beach, Va. 23455 Dear Editor, I am sending in a subscription for my son's birthday, to The Mountain Laurel. He loves the Blue Ridge and comes up there when he...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

| GENEALOGY I am doing research on the Napier family of Buncombe Co., NC. I need to know the name of Fredrick Napiers father and Mother. Fredrick had a brother Patrick who was a doctor. He had a son Charlie Napier who migrated to Smith (Harlan, Co.) KY. Charlie married Sarah Elizabeth Jones. They remained in KY. Until their death. Patrick Napier remained in North Carolina. Anyone who could help me or him wishes to exchange information will be welcome. Sarah Jeppson 3624 Miller Dr. Greensboro, NC 27405 Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only *B.OO Send A Gift! TELL US THE OCCASION (MERRY CHRISTMAS, 2 Y ear (24 Issues) Onlv *14.00 HAPPY THANKSGIVING, THINKING OF YOU, J HAPPY BIRTHDAY, GET WELL SOON, HAPPY RETIREMENT, ETC. AND WE WILL SEND THE O Yf I O/C T \ 1 n n AA appropiate card.) o Y car (oo Issues) Only 10.00 Send Your Check Or Money Order To (CANADA AND ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES ADD SIO.OO PER YEAR Mountain Laurel TO COVER AD...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 Here in the Blue Ridge, there are so manv wonderful people. I always have a difficult time deciding who to visit next. One rainy afternoon I headed out near the Parkway to see a very special couple, Thomas and Delia Belcher. These lovely people are a great asset to our community and I count it a privilege to know them. Their home is a neat white frame house nestled at the foot of Slate Mountain, with a yard tended by loving hands. I climbed the front steps and knocked on the door. A sweet lady with fluffy white hair answered my knock and invited me in. Delia Belcher gave me a comfortable chair and already I felt at home. She said, "Thomas will be back in a few minutes." So we chatted until Thomas returned and then he began to tell me a little about himself. "Well, I don't know if there's much to tell or not. I was born in Floyd County at the Dean Potter Place on February 19, 1918. My parents were Benjamin Harrison Belcher and Mamie Conner Belch...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

THOMAS & DELLA BELCHER (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14) and two boys." "I bet you have done a lot of sewing with five girls." "Yes, I sure did and couldn't have dressed them so well if I hadn't made their clothes. I made dresses for the girls and shirts for the boys. My children were sent to school as neat and clean as could be. The printed feed sacks made pretty dresses back in those days and I've sewed plenty of them." "I bet you did. Those feed sacks made lovely dresses, sheets and things. Once my mom made me a sun dress from one. It was pretty. I sure would love to have a print feed bag skirt to wear now. they had some of the prettiest prints." "Delia, tell me about your quilts. I know you do beautiful work." "I've been quilting since I was a young girl and lost track of how many I've made. It would be in the hundreds. I gave all the children and grandchildren quilts when they got married. Guess I'll start on great-grandchildren next. I have a lot of quilts in my family with...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 EARLY CHILDHOOD MEMORIES The old adage, "Spare the rod and spoil the child," was religiously adhered to by my mother and father when I was a growing youngster. That advice apparently is correct because I was never spoiled. Nevertheless, all those doses of "hickory tea" never cured the orneriness and stubborness in me. I must give my mother credit, however, for trying substitutes and using whipping for punishment as a last resort. Her favorite deterrent for mischief was scaring the daylights out of me. "If you don't behave, the Bogey Man will get you or , the Old Scratch will get you, was mv mother's favorite admonitions. The only way she could get me to wear a hat when outside was to tell me, "The crows will snatch your hair out to line their nests if you don't keep your hat on." Uncle Sol, my favorite story teller, unintentionally gave my mother two more weapons to help keep me in submission when he told me the stories about Davey Lane's confr...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

BONE STRANGER BY: THOMAS A. SIMPKINS We used to laugh at him when I was a kid and he was still an old man. He'd go riding by, that gaunt figure slumped on the back of that half starved old horse. We used to call him the "Bone Stranger on Silver the Wonder Horse". (It was a wonder he was still alive.) We felt sorry for the horse. He called the horse King and was very proud. We threw apples in the chug holes in the road beside the house so that when Silver stopped to eat them the Bone Stranger, half asleep, would almost fall off on his head. He came each day, every day, to check his mail box. He never seemed aware that the mail didn't run on Sundays or holidays, and no one bothered to tell him, not that he would have understood what those days meant anymore. He never got any mail, as I could tell, except his once a month Social Security check, once a season Sears and Roebuck catalogue, or his once a year card from his favorite son at Christmas. He buried the check, looked at the women...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PACK IS MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 EDITORS NOTE: The following story is continued from "THE SUNSHINE TALES " which appeared last month. I must tell you more about the "bank lot." The "bank" was a coal mine. People there referred to a coal mine as a "coal bank" because when they mined the coal. They had little cars and little mules to pull them and the men went in with a pick and a shovel and loaded the cars and the mules pulled the coal out. Well, Grandpa Syers (Aunt Belle's childrens' grandpa) had a coal mine down in the bank lot that had long since been worked out. The old works was there - the entrance, old rotting props, cob webs, spiders, and anything else that lived in the woods and we loved to play there. The trees were tall, some of them. Some were saplings - we could climb them. Some had good grapevines hanging down so that we could get one and make a swing. Then there was always the entrace to he mine to dare one to go into. We didn't go very far back there was always ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

THE BANK LOT (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18) sister and recieved my high school diploma. The first year of school for a child started when he or she was six years old. They started in a "primmer" class or "chart class." I did not like this class. I was bored. You had to learn the alphabet, sounds, and read such simple nonsense, so I thought, like "Nat is a boy., see Nat run...Nat saw a rat." Of course, words were associated with similar sounds and simple words but we already had known what these words were. It was for a purpose and it was educational. Regardless of how many students read it all at one time, we were taught to wait until Nellie Miller and all the others who were slow readers, to catch up. Then the teachers turned the page. We were taught to read and spell aloud; also to add or subtract at the blackboard and the teacher held up a gadget with what I thought was strings of beads on wires and talked about it for awhile, then began moving them around and adding to and taking away...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEiMHER, 1986 THE LAUREL FOUNDATION The initial goal of the "Foundation", as stated in our September issue, is to raise enough money to buy broadcast quality video equiptment in order for Jim Waters, nationally known photojournalist, to begin traveling full time throughout the Blue Ridge and capturing on film the memories of older mountain residents. These mountains are a special place and there are folks here who remember the grist mills of yesterday and plowing with oxen. Their memories are a national treasure too precious to lose. We wish to express our sincere appreciation to everyone who is sharing the dream and especially to the following persons who have contributed to The Laurel Foundation: CALEB AND HENRY (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22) while but you fellows will be back to arguing before you know it. Of course he'll have to stay here a few more days so we can keep an eye on him. He'll miss out on a home cooked Thanksgiving dinner this afternoon but he's ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

CALEB AND HENRY By the time they got to the hospital Caleb seemed to be sleeping and Henry had nearly worried himself into a nervous tither that something was going to happen to his old friend Caleb. Finally Doc Pritchard emerged from the emergency room and Henry was right there waiting for him. "How is he going to be Doc? Is he going to be all right? "Now, now, Henry no use getting yourself worried into the hospital with Caleb. Be patient. It's a serious matter and Caleb has really had a rough time but his chances are good. He's a good strong man so don't you worry. We'll know more by in the morning, so why don't you just go home and get a good night's rest." The waiting room was filled with Caleb and Henry's children, grandchildren and friends. Everybody was anxiously overhearing Henry's conversation with the doctor. Henry said, "If you don't mind Doc, I'll just stay here and wait on him. He has sit with me through some pretty rough times and I don't think it would be doing him ri...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1986 mm\ MOUNT AIRY, N.C. 740 AM NORTHWEST NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUNTWEST VIRGINIA'S MOST POWERFUL AM STATION [3038] (919) 786-6111 GREETINGS FROM LINVILLE! P 546] '■ss7 A t - 100% NATURAL "LET THE OLD HAMPTON DELIVER GOODNESS T 'pjgSSg DOOR! " vOhEto SEE OUR CATALOG - WE CA STONE GROUND FLOVR & MEAL, TO JAMS - JELLIES - HONEY- REL AND MUCH , M tMAIL SI.OO TO: I (REFUNDABLE WITH FIRST PURCHASE) HAMPTON GR P.O. BOX pJj&P^ LINVILLE, NC 28646 C>OUT 704-733-5213 CALEB AND HENRY keep a eye on Caleb." AH night long Henry sat patiently beside of Caleb's bed, keeping a watchful eye over his old friend, his mind quietly retracing their footsteps over the last three quarters of a century. A passersby peaking in the door might have been surprised to occasionally hear a chuckle as Henry remembered an amusing episode from years past. He recalled a time when Caleb and him had sneaked a bunch of his Pa's black powder. They weren't ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

BACKROADS (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24) Blue Ridge Parkway in Meadows of Dan. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. Bring along your camera and allow at least 2 leisurely hours to complete the entire drive of 35.4 miles. 00.0 (00.0) We will begin this month's tour at the intersection of US Highway 58 and the Blue Ridge Parkway in Meadows of Dan, Virginia. Traveling west on US 58, toward Hillsville, Virginia, we will begin our mileage readings as pass beneath the Parkway overpass. 02.4 (02.4) We are now entering Floyd County and leaving Patrick County, Virginia. 04.0 (01.6) We are now entering Carroll County and leaving Floyd County, Virginia. 06.2 (02.2) We are now entering the community of Laurel Fork, Virginia. 07.1 (00.9) On our left is the Laurel Fork Elementary School. 07.6 (00.5) Here we will turn right onto paved state road 651. This turn is just past E.M. Nester's General Store. 08.5 (0.9) Ahead is a picturesque view. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

fh V m w ®Ld Jw4 If TlJjMjm HEART or THE BLUE RIDGE f\ounid?n w * I '' A Copyright 1986 Laurel Publications Inc. NOVEMBER aurel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life PAGE 24 » A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. This month our BACKROAD tour will travel through one of the most beautiful sections of Carroll County, Virginia. It is an area of beautiful trout streams and picturesque old farms. Don't make the mistake so many folks make and assume that sight-seeing in the mountains ends with October because often November yields some of our most breathtaking views. It is true that many of the leaves are gone by now but often the most spectacular views are hidden by the foliage and after the leaves fall a whole new world of mountain scenery comes aliv...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1986

THE BLUE RIDGE DIGEST NOVEMBER 1986 NOTICE TO MOUNTAIN TRAVELERS At the end of each Blue Ridge Digest listing and on most advertisements throughout THE MOUNTAIN LAUREL are [numbers in brackets]. If you would like to know more about the services or attractions offered by these organizations or businesses you may request additional information by using the form on page 21 of this month's issue. Simply place a check mark, on the form, beside the business [number] you want to know more about or if you are ordering for an organization such as a AAA club or church group indicate how many copies of the brochures your organization wishes to receive. With so many beautiful places to see, interesting things to do and attractions to visit throughout the Blue Ridge we hope this service will enable you to plan your trip in order to enjoy our mountains to the fullest. If you are planning to travel the Blue Ridge Parkway there are four information packets that you will not want to be without. They...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x