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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

February 1995 USDA closings will create hardship to Virginia farmers (Continued from Page 1) State agency directors were then given a suggested list of closings to consider. Black said that representatives of the three USDA agencies met and discussed the list. "We wanted to match service agencies and clients as best we could within the confines of the number of offices required by the USDA," Black explained. "Given the numbers we were given, we tried to come up with closings we could live with." And he feels the final list is something farmers can live with. Espy, when he announced the closing list Dec. 7, said it was time for the USDA to move beyond a government structure that dates to the 1930s when transportation systems were much more primitive. "We can no longer justify the presence of offices in certain places where the farm population no longer exists," Espy said. But Virginia farmers who live in "places where the farm population no longer exists" say that just isn't so. Four...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

6 QUINAULT EVERBEARING STRAWBERRIES Gteal Hw Uafueht PICK BERRIES UP TO 2" IN * DIAMETER FROM JUNE .. TILL FROST #- f <9 |f£<s $ (9 $ €>>1 10 for $1.95 25 for $ 3.95 VI- * GCo <5 (0- !? 50 for $6.95 100f0r511.95 |V.f» ®s % ,J PLANT THIS YEAR — HARVEST THIS YEAR Vpl fit 1 h' /t' • /• ' £ y W Here's a great-lasting, heavy-bearing new everbearing Straw- Wjfo '»? ,r >-V7'(n oitf ■& berry that grows so big we hesitate to tell you...we're afraid yJo 1 0 7j* you won't believe us. But they hove been found as big as tea /'fa 1 ; |l cups This amazing berry was developed by Washington State Iff., x \n' University. It is well on its way to being the greatest performer i.jVA ever. Quinault hos been tested in 13 states ond Canada with excellent performance record for siie. taste and plant growth. IT WAS FOUND TO BE THE MOST DISEASE FREE EVERBEARING WE HAVE TESTED Because it is so new the Quinault is still being tested. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

February 1995 VFB Safety Program helping fire departments for third year By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—The Virginia Farm Bureau Safety Program began helping rural fire departments fight fires two years ago. That's when the organization started a cost-sharing program with fire departments to help purchase and install dry hydrants where water supplies aren't readily accessible. Over the past two years, the Farm Bureau has helped pay for a total of 46 dry hydrants. "And interest, demand and responses have grown," said Tommy Hicks, assistant safety coordinator for the VFB. So, in 1995 during the program's third year, the Safety Program plans to select and help pay for and install another 42 dry hydrants. Applications were sent in January to 800 volunteer fire departments throughout rural Virginia, Hicks said. Once the applications are reviewed, he and Safety Coordinator Bruce Stone will select three sites in each of the Farm Bureau's 14 board districts. Dry hydrants, w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

8 Unique timber industry calls for special estate plans By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG —Estate planning is different for timber owners because their business is so unique. And that's why it's so important they make a plan, according to Dr. Harry L. Haney Jr., Garland Gray Professor of Forestry in the College of Forestry and Wildlife Resources at Virginia Tech. Estate planning is figuring out how to use your wealth most effectively during your lifetime and how to transfer your wealth to heirs when you die. "Planning helps avoid the high cost of dying unprepared that comes from having unexpected heirs, unexpected values, an unnecessary burden of death taxes and administrative costs, undue loss of income and asset shrinkage due to liquidation," Haney said. "This can be a particularly challenging activity for a farm family whose timber holdings are a significant part of their assets." That's because there are many problems peculiar to the timber growing business. For ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

February 1995 GATT clears way for fewer world trade barriers WASHINGTON—President Clinton signed the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade agreement Dec. 8, clearing the way for lower trade barriers and tariffs to American farmers beginning Jan. 1. Tm hopeful the agreement will reduce trade barriers and lead to more markets for American farm products, which will then lead to better prices," commented Dean Kleckner, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation, who was invited to witness the event. Virginia peanut growers were among those who stood against the treaty to the end, fearing it would leave them vulnerable to cheaper quality, cut-rate foreign peanut imports. "Well have to hope for the best now," said C. Wayne Ashworth, president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "If GAIT succeeds in cutting off the flood of peanut paste imports coming into this country under the North American Free Trade Agreement, it will go a long way toward easing our producer's concerns." In...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

10 Tj? Llamas ~ useful, fun, profitable ~ Llama Association of the r % I Llamas as sentries . , . _ Alpacas and Llamas Mld-AtlantlC States produce fine fiber I /iT j/fy Don't miss these llama events o-v sponsored by UA»M#A#S... \ Llamas can perform I ■fcSh J . . . C Lura Y' VA 22835 Llamas & Alpacas I JJJjB/ ° I September 25 & 26, 1994 There are a number of other llama events flrjjjV II ii rarfc Virgina State Fair Grounds to be held in Virginia and its surrounding Richmond, Virginia states in the next year. LAMAS members «v |M \ Contact: Dale Graham will be happy to let you know when they tfj/i \ (703)937-4475 are and where they will take place. I Llamas for parades Llamas for packing and hiking Llamas are for sharing | The following farms would welcome your visits or inquiries and have llamas or alpacas for sale ALPACAS NORTHERN VIRGINIA Bennington Alpacas Cedar Knoll Hacienda de Paz Stone Llamas Haas and Cristi Kyler Donnie & Carol Townsend Len ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

February 1995 New women's committee district chairmen will tell agriculture's story HI had to credit one thing for making the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee successful, it would have to be its volunteers. The ladies who freely give their time and efforts to telling agriculture's story to Virginians make the state committee, as well as all the individual county women's committees, as successful as they are. This year we say good-bye to two hardworking State Women's Committee district chairmen; and hello to two new chairmen, who will be taking over their duties. New chairmen urge communication among state, local young farmers As we sit in front of our computer screen, both of us are unsure where to begin. So, we will start by introducing ourselves. Our names are Craig and Michelle Giese, and we have been appointed your State Young Farmers' Committee chairmen for 1995. We live in Lively, which is in Lancaster County. From 1991-1993 we served as chairmen of the Northu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

12 IMPORTANT Health Care News Virginia Farm Bureau Announces Two New Health Care Insurance Products from Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield That May Provide You the Coverage You Need and SAVE YOU MONEY Individual Choice SM HMO Program For the individual who is concerned about quality and cost and wants comprehensive coverage for himself and his loved ones. - No annual medical deductible Fixed, low co-payments for doctor visits - Unlimited lifetime maximum benefits Individual Choice, from Health Keepers, Inc. f provides extensive medical services - when you're well...and when you're not!* * Service in your area may be provided by Peninsula Healthcare, Inc. or Health Keepers, Inc. Individual Choice™ may not be available in your area. Please call for availability. Virginia Advantage SM Program Covers hospitalization and surgery, physicians' services and office visits, emergency and preventive care and other medical services*. You also get: - Money-saving prescription drug card - Vision care...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

February 1995 Viewing Virginia Forestry association names new vice president RICHMOND—PauI R. Howe has been named executive vice president of the Virginia Forestry Association, which has 1,500 members. Howe served as the Southeastern Technical Division forester of the American Pulpwood Association in Columbia, S.C., for the past five years, working with wood using companies and logging contractors on issues pertaining to safe and efficient harvesting, transportation and utilization of forest products. Farm Bureau member named president of international association DOS WELL—Louis Brooking Jr., owner of Brookmade Sod Farms and a 26year Farm Bureau member, was named president of the Turfgrass Producers International, formerly the American Sod Producers Association. As president of the 900-member nonprofit trade association with members in 35 countries, Brooking will be responsible for the group's overall operations. Prior to becoming president, he served TPI as vice president and secre...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

February 1995 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) May 19-21, Knoxville, Tenn. Thousands attended last year! Selling, seminars, animal demonstrations. Heartsong Triple D Farm, 1292 Lakemoore, Jefferson City, Tenn. 37760, 615-475-3777. WANTED—host farms for young European farmers on your farm/agribusiness. Info.: BFE, 86-71 106 th St., Queens, N.Y. 11418. SAUSAGE MAKERS GREAT!—German recipes. Frankfurters, summer sausage, bologna, venison sausage, pork sausage. $1, Hamiltons, Box 652-2, New Ulm, Minn. 56073. WANTED—Gibson, Fender, Martin, Gretsch, Moserite, Danelectro, or any other American-made name brand guitars, bass guitars, banjos, mandolins, amplifiers, made before 1976. Paying top dollar cash. Call 703-382-4027 collect, or write to: Karry East, 2490 Glade Drive, Christiansburg, Va. 24073. EIGHT WINE REClPES—raisin, apple rhubarb, blackberry, grape, dandelion, turnip. $3, Recipes, Box 159, Hiltons, Va. 24258-0159. PLASTIC POTS—I-gallon, slightly used, good condition, $.0...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1995

T, ■ •. ; . mam : :« ■ hHOl^Hnk : - U ImICIIIIIIM ■ JJi I ■ ■ M| I ■ I B ■ ■ I I ■ I I ■ H ■ ■ v m m m I I I B I HI mw m B V ■ B ' 1 M - ' ;,.„I Vol. 54, No. 1 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS February 1995 Waiting and hoping on a winter's day This small herd of beef cattle cast a collective gaze over an ice-covered farm pond in Goochland County on a cold January afternoon. The bovines' curiosity probably stemmed from hope that the photographer would deliver a nice, round bale of fresh hay. Winter means farmers are busy not only with outdoor projects like keeping livestock fed, but with indoor duties such as taxes and important farm meetings. ► A full range of life insurance programs ► Some of Virginia's most competitive iTTV auto & home insurance rates Complete farmowners protection I M ij f J 4 v ► A wide range of health insurance plans B||^SSSSBBSB3 Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company Virginia Farm Bu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

Vol. 54, No. 2 Cotton becoming fashionable cash commodity for Virginia By KATHY DIXON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—FIuffy, white bolls of cotton have become a cushy cash commodity for Virginia farmers. Cotton has experienced a rebirth in the state —one that is quickly creating cottony profits for former corn producers. "Cotton went out for a lot of reasons, and it has come back for a lot of different reasons," said Johnny Parker, a cotton agronomist at Commonwealth Gin in Windsor. He previously worked as an extension agent in Virginia and North Carolina, and as a cotton consultant in North Carolina. Cotton was once king in the Southeast, but a combination of the destructive boll weevil and a decrease in demand for cotton caused cotton acreage to decline. By the 19605, cotton acreage in Southeast Virginia "went to just about nothing," Parker said. "The last time I grew cotton, I picked it by hand," said Marvin Everett of Southampton County, who represents District 13 on the Virgi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

2 Women, young farmers represent FB's present, future In recent weeks, I've had the privilege of attending state conferences for two of the most energetic, most important groups within Farm Bureau. I'm referring to the Virginia Farm Bureau Women's and Young Farmers' committees. Both are great assets to an already great organization. Fm not just whistling Dixie. Women and young farmers play a vital role on our farms, within the industry and in Farm Bureau Most county organizations are blessed with women and young farmer committees that motivate and activate other members, raise money for worthy causes and promote the industry to the general public. Women across Virginia have been doing this for years, but with little credit. As American Farm Bureau President Dean Kleckner recently noted, "Our farm women have been partners from the beginning. They've helped plow and plant, farrow and butcher." I want to commend both groups for an outstanding year in 1994. The Farm Bureau women counted...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

March 1995 Ag Activities March 7-9: Farm Management Computer Workshop, Chesapeake. Sponsored by Virginia Cooperative Extension. Contact Richard Rhodes at 804-547-6348. March 8: Virginia Council of Farmer Cooperatives annual meeting, Graves Mountain Lodge, Syria. Keynote speaker: Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services J. Carlton Courier 111. Contact Bob Bryan, 804-281-1452. ' lis7=i K March 11-12: 37th Annual Highland Maple Festival, Highland County. Includes tours of maple camps, craft show and entertainment. For more information, call the Highland County Chamber of Commerce at 703-468-2550. March 14-15: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Congressional Meetings, Washington. Contact Alex Hamilton, VFBF public affairs director, 804-784-1361. March 17-19: Ninth Annual Virginia Sustainable Agriculture Conference, Camp Blue Ridge, Montebello. Contact Robins Buck at 804-786-1917. March 18-19: 37th Annual Highland Maple Festival, Highland County. Includes tours of maple camps, craf...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

4 Buyanew Dodge Truck and pick up a ton ofcash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU" MEMBERS. As if our Magnum engine series, overall the most powerful line of truck engines on the planet, wasn't incentive enough for Farm Bureau members to buy a Dodge, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1995 5.9 L Magnum gas and Cummins diesel Ram regular cab pickups, plus select 1995 mid-size Dakota pickups. The offer includes all full-size 1995 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge offer* All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover, it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. i *•••• \^. r H »9i ww^lIM *This cash hack offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31/95, and may not be used in combination with any other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or certain other special ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

March 1995 Va. farmers harvest record yields RlCHMOND—Virginia farmers harvested record-high yields in 1994 for soybeans, flue-cured tobacco and cotton, according to final estimates released by the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. These yields are in sharp contrast to the reduced yields recorded dining the drought-ridden 1993 crop season. Soybean yields averaged a record high of 33 bushels per acre, up 11 bushels from 1993. The previous record was 32 bushels per acre, which was recorded in 1990. The flue-cured tobacco yield was a record 2,420 pounds per acre. This output was 385 pounds above the previous year and compares with the prior record of 2,280 pounds per acre in 1984. Ornamental plants brighten dull winter landscapes Snow provides a novel backdrop for landscape plants. It accentuates the brilliant splashes of color contributed by persistent berries and vibrant stems. It spotlights the shapely silhouettes of some shrubs, trees and ornamental grasses. Noting where li...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

6 Buy Before April 1 Multi-Angle M/B Long Bar/Short Bar ■ Excellent drawbar pull with long bar/short bar lugs for improved traction ■ Designed for improved stability and road handling, plus reduced vibration ■ Strong angle-braced lugs have self-cleaning design ■ High-strength polyester cord body, and heavy duty rim shield protects tire from damage Discounters $ee Details Below Ist tire 2nd tire Ist tire 2nd tire 11.2—24 4 ply $154 $138.60 16.9—30 6 ply $344 $309.60 12.4—24 4 ply 182 163.80 18.4—30 6 ply 379 341.10 12.4—28 4 ply 170 153.00 18.4—34 6 ply 384 345.60 13.6—28 4 ply 189 170.10 18.4—34 8 ply 445 400.50 14.9—28 6 ply 271 243.90 18.4—38 6 ply 429 386.10 15.5—38 6 ply 288 259.20 18.4—38 8 ply 481 432.90 16.9—28 6 ply 321 288.90 20.8—38 8 ply 654 588.60 Radial M/B n Long Bar/Short Bar ■ Revolutionary 3-lug per pitch design improves traction and ride ■ Computer designed "natural" shape casing improves tire body life ■ Radial construction provides better traction, lower fuel and...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

March 1995 Grain sorghum's advantage over corn is drought resistance By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF County Communications Specialist WILLIAMSBURG —Farmers who plant grain sorghum instead of corn will see a greater profit on their return, said Dr. Dan Brann, Virginia Cooperative Extension grain specialist Brann, who spoke to grain farmers at the 16th Annual Corn-Soybean Conference in Williamsburg Feb. 6-8, stressed that grain sorghum's greatest advantage over corn is its drought tolerance. "On test plots at the Tidewater Experiment Station, we got 138 bushels of grain sorghum versus 90 bushels of corn on non-irrigated soil," Brann said. He added that other test plots in Virginia had similar results —sorghum did significantly better than com in arid soils, and grew equally well in irrigated soils. "And grain sorghum seeds are less expensive than com seeds," Brann added. He also noted that grain sorghum could save feed money for Virginia livestock producers. To grow and store grain sorghum has...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1995

8 Young farmers reminded they are Farm Bureau's future (Continued from Page 1) very often. They play a vital role. "But so can you... now and in the future." Another conference speaker told the young farmers basically the same thing. "The world is run by those who show up," said William Perry Pendley, president and chief legal officer of the Mountain States Legal Foundation in Denver, Co. The foundation is a non-profit, public interest law center dedicated to individual liberty, the right to own and use property, limited government and the free enterprise system. He urged the young farmers to get involved in fighting environmental policy. "It isn't just something happening in other places," Pendley said. "It's about things that are happening in every community today." As proof of the young farmers' leadership skills, many of them received awards during the conference. Six committees receive outstanding performance awards Outstanding Young Farmer Committee awards were given to six co...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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