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Elephind.com contains 14,999 items from Great Southern Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Victorian Coal. OUTCROP NEAR FOSTER. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

Victorian Coal. -:n: — ■ OUTCROP NEAR FOSTER. Mi- S. H. Hunter, engineer for boring, Mines department, 1ms p re sell td to tlie Minister of Mines a report regarding an outcrop of coal near Foster discovered by Sir James Baker. The coal outcrop, it says, is is situated close to the north boun dary, and about 20 chains eastward of the north-west corner of allotment 228, section C, parish of Wonga Wonga, South. Where tested by a small tunnel the coal is somewhat , faulted, and is consequently soff i through crushing, but the quality of the coal appears to be excellent, and an analysis made some time ago by this department of a sample for warded by Mr Baker proved to be high in fixed carbon, and low in ash percentages. Mr Baker informed Mr Hunter that about SOft west of the outcrop he sunk a hand bore and proved nearly 5ft of coal. A Govern ment bore sunk in 1896 three-quarters of a mile away in a north-westerly direction proved five inches of coal at 474ft, and 1ft lOin at 750ft. It is...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

WEUKALG6C 0 !M 3 Dearly Drivm mat! Higbl and Day, Bui ttkmtm Conic CURED HER Here is a letter which nil women should read, especially those who are prone to neuralgic affections, nnd who pa** hours of acuity and ill-health through them. This letter tells those women more than can he specially written of the relief of Neuralgia l»y Clements Tonic, and it w s sent from 411 Clarendon Street, South Melbourne, t\fi'li CLEMENTS TONIC LTD., 41 For the benefit of those who suffer from Nemalgia I should like to tell them of my cure. lt It is a few years back I hail that complaint, and it lasted for the best part of five years. Many people said it had become chronic with me—that I would never gel rid of it—and I got to believe their opinion correct, for doctors' advice and prescriptions did not have the least effect. I used numerous other medicines and re medies, until I was despairing of ever getting better. This affected my general health. I became thin and weak, and put years on to my appe...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CULTIVATE SELF RELIANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

I CULTlVATJi SKLF KELIANC®. The love which a mother bears' lo ler children sometimes prevents he' rom submit ling them to any of thoB. woeessess which harden and givi itrenglli of character, physical ns wel 13 moral. Perhaps her own life ha.; seen drawn in rough places, and shi wishes (o shield her offspring from auj inch fate. She may not realise thai ner own strength of character has beer nainly derived from trial; or, perhaps ler own life lias been one of case and luxury, and she docs not know the <ood which conies from straggling with >bstacles a«d difficulties and overcom ng them. There is such a thing as making lif« far too hard for children, and there if llso such a tiling as making it far toe !asv. The intelligent mother will strive to do neither the one nor the other, bill •boose that middle course which is not jxtreme. The summer is one of Uu oest times to begin this process, and '.he main feature for both boys and sirls is a great dea1 oi out-door lift* They...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOTEL FOR "DOWN-AND-OUTS." [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

HOTEL FOR "DOWN-AND-OUTS." An hotel for "down-and-outs," which has just been opened in Chicago by Mr. Charles Dawes, a millionaire bank president, is filled every night, while many are turned away for lack of accommodation. Mr. Dawes erecto i the house at a cost of £20,000, in memory of his son Rufus, who was drowned. The hotel, the "Chronicle" says, provides a bath and a night's lodging for 2 ^d., while private rooms can be secured for 5d. The rules of the house are framed so as not to hurl the pride of any of the guests. Soup can be obtained for a penny, coffce at the same price, and other food in pro portion. The place is a godsend to Chicago's poor workers, many of whom are out of employment at pro sent. E.-ery night the place is storm ed by those who wish to get in out of the cold, a line of nearly 500 men awaiting entrance. The house ac commodates only 300, and the strug gles for priority of place in the lino are pitiful to behold.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Deserted from the Army. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

Deserted from the Army. A line of navvies, who were digging a trench on a country- road, delegated one of their number to fetch water to quench their thirst from a tap out side the nearest cottage. The man who performed (his task had been several times to the tap before lie saw any of the inmates of the cottage. On his fifth visit, however, lie saw a wo man bending over the tap filling a pail, and as the navvy came up she Lurned and looked at him. "So it's you, is it?" said the woman "Well, you see that constable coining up the road? He's your old comrade. Bill Jones, and my husband. Wliei he readies me I'll put liiin 011 vou; track. You've got a start of thro, hundred yards. Make the nio:;t ul it." The navvy did so. Dropping bis tins and seizing hit coat, lie sped down the long line ol his astonished mates, who were pres fiiitly further amazed t.> hoc 1.1m con stable, after a word with his wifi'. start in pursuit. Tile navvy was an old r.ww-i/ioart ol the woman's, whom he bud cn...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHICH END OF A POST SHOULD BE UP. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

-I WHICH END OF. A POST SHOULD BE UP. It is a common belief among farm ers that a post will last longer it set in the ground the reverse of the way K grew in the tree, in other words, with the butt end up. Accordingly, one sees many posts, especially end and gate posts, with the small end down. The supposition is that sap in a tree is always ascending, or at le.ist that it is easier for the sap to go up than down. Consequently, it is argued, turning a post upside down tends to prevent the rise of water, helps to keep the wood dry, and, therefore, renders it less liable to de cay. As a matter of fact, sap or water can flow in either direction with equal facility and the popular notion to the contrary is incorrect. Careful experiments on the relative durability of post timbers have been made by the Ohio Agricultural Experi ment Station (says the "Scientific American") and the above questio:. was considered. One fence in par ticular contained 15G black locust posts, of which 8G were se...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Korumburra Fire Brigade Following is the syllabus of the Korumburra fire brigade to Dec. 25, 1914:— [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

Korumburra Fire Brigade, Following, is tliii syllabus of U\u Kurumburru lire' brigiulc . to Dec. •25, 191 -t- ^r;. ;•/' !■.' I SU-l May 1—'Torchlight procession . , „ 8—Huiiril mcL'iiiiK . 15— 1 man, Marshall C3inpoLitinn ." .. "22—t miin, Marshall competition „ 2;l—iti'jjulation practice, liru practico Jnne o—Kiro practice 12—Uoar-l mcctiiiir l!t—Ambulauco class - „ 20—Koenlatimi practice July 3—Amlml lieu class .,: 10—Hoard meutiiiy 17—Amlmlai ce class „ 21—Plain and fancy dress bill 24—Opun iiil'I t ,, 3t—Heiiulniinn practice, plus -it • "" sfection A lift 7—Ambi.laucc i lass „ 14—Hoard im-tUng. .. 21—Ambulance class •• • 28—Uognlittimi. practice Sept. 4—Kllis tompmilioii „r II —Hoard mooting , „ IS—I5lli« co npoiition „ '25—llfKUlation praitice Oct. 2— Ladii's' night „ SI—Hoard meeting „ Hi—Disabled hose competition „ 23—Championship compotiuon „ 28—Championship competition „ 30—lteyulaLion practice _ . Nov. 4—Championship competition ., . U—Championship competition ,, 13—Board ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

WELSBACH THE WORLD'S BEST FOR COUNTRY LIGHTING. Air Gas Machines. The Welsbach Air Gas Ma chine is bo sim pie that a child can work it with impunity, Suitable for Lighting, Heat ing and Cook ing. We guar antee satisfac tion with all our Machines, and to prove this „ „ machine in for one month free of charge, and it not suit able, will remove same free of al! cost to you. Write for Catalogue. WELSBACH LIGHT COMPANY OF AUSTRALASIA LIMITED, ISO f,ONSTUT..K PT.. MKMlOUItNE.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FACTS CONCERNING YOURSELF [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

FACTS CONCERNING YOURSELF Each ear lias lour bones. Tho body has about, 500 muscles. Tho human skull contains thirty cones. Tho lower limbs contain thirty bonea each, r Every hair has two oil-glands at its base. The sense of touch is dullest on the back. The globe of the eye is moved by six muscles. The wrist contains four bones; the palm, five; the fingers, fourteen. The roots of the hair penetrate the Bkin about one-twelfth of an inch. Hair is very strong. A single hair will bear a weight of about fifteen hundred grains. The enamel of the lcel.li contains over 95 per cent, calcareous matter. Tho weight of the average man is 140 lbs.; of a woman, 115 lbs. The brain is supposed to contain over two hundred million colls, in which thought works out problems.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HENCE KOREA'S BACKWARDNESS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

HENCE KOREA'S BACKWARD NESS. Tn Korea both men and women <moke pipes having liny metal howls, and stems so long Hint generally assist ance must lie .summoned to light them. As they nre inveterate smokers, and tlioir pipes hold so little tobacco that they must be refilled and relighted every few minutes, the greater portion ;if their time is thus consumed. Jfc is, therefore, safe to say that one )f the prime causes of Korea's back wardness in . development is the na tional pipe. Another cause is found in the greed and shortsightedness of the Imperial "policy, in appropriating ^ individual wealth wherever found. Thus all am bition is destroyed, and no native will strive for more than a bare livelihood, knowii g that anything he may accu mulate over and above that will b« taken from him by the tax collector.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR YOUNG WIVES. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

FOR YOUNG WIVES. • Thnt it is always decidedly cheaper fri'the end'to buy only good carpets and good furniture. That, no matter how tiny tho in rcome, a small sum should be put aside regularly for the proverbial rainy day. .' That a simple dinner, well served, is decidedly more enjoyable than an ilabornte dinner poorly served. - That a practical knowledge of 'econ omy of good cookery' will be absolutely necessary for the young housewife, no matter how much 'help' she can afford to keep. That all bills for marketing should be paid weekly, or, better still, when the articles are bought. That, with care and economy, a small amount of money will do won ders. That it is important to be system atic in looking after the left overs. That all cold vegetables and scrap* of meat may be used in soups and sal ads and croquettes, and many appetis ing ways too numerous to mention. That, 'where there's a will there's e .way,' even if the means are limited.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Wise Precaution. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

A Wise Precaution. Two seamen—an Irishman and a Scotsman—liad been breaking leave and had been ordered to receive ten strokes or the "cat." They had pre viously held very good characters, and, taking this into consideration, the captain suid that if they wished to wear anything to protect their backs, a little they might do so. The Scotsman replied that he would like to have a strip of canvas on liis back, and this request was granted. "What would you like to have, Pat?" asked the captain, turning to the second seaman. "Shure, sir," was the reply, "if it's all the same to you, I'd like to have the Scotsman on my back!"

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Poor Congregation. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

A Poor Conareaation. Mr. Robert Fold, who has just pub lished a delightful book entitled "This tledown," tells ail amusing story of a clergyman who stood for some time one .Monday morning watching a man fishing for trout in a Scotch stream. "I'm a fisher, too," remarket!" the minister in the course of conversation, adding rather unctuously: "But a fisher of men." "Aye," was the dry retort of the angler, "I had a peep into your creel yesterday. Ye didna' seem to hae catched many!"

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Mark of Nationality. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

A Mark of Nationality. Sir David Gill, the famous astrono mer, was once emphasising'the extra ordinary care and minuteness with which astronomical observations were taken. One observation, he said, was rather similar in its extreme minuteness to attempting to see the hundredth part of the diameter of a threepenny-bit that was a mile nwav. "One can see that you're a Scots man," retorted one of his hearers. "Nobody else would bother about the hundredth part of a threepenny-bit a mile away!"

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Something to Help. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

Something to-Help. When the Kaiser announced to Prince von Buelow that he had deci ded to appoint him Chancellor of the Empire, he was surprised to see a shadow of disappointment cross the statesman's face. ' What's the matter?" he demanded. "Are you not satisfied?" "Pardon me, sire," replied the Prince, "I did not wish to appear un grateful, but 1 was thinking of my wife. I know that she detests the im mense Chancellor's pulnce, whore we shall have to live, and she will want the whole of the interior thoroughly cleaned and redecorated. I am afraid, therefore, that we shall have to pass tli>! next two or three months in tiie midst of cleaning operations." "Don't worry about that, my dear von Buelow," replied the Kaiser. "Present my best compliments to the Princess, and tell her that I shall have much pleasure in helping her to make the task of cleaning easier for her." The new-made Chancellor thanked him. and retired, certain that the Kaiser would place a regiment of cleaners at ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What It Meant. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

What It Meant. A good story is being told o£ a Parliamentary candidate who is "nur sing" a Sussex constituency in view of the next election. He was earnest ly expounding the emancipation of the laborer to an agricultural audience, and was approaching the heart of the subject, when lie noticed that the countrymen looked uneasily at one another. Could it be that'he had not made the necessity of the great deliv erance clear to their minds. He re traced the steps, and enforced some of the prelim'nary points over again. The uneasiness of the audience visi bly increased. • At last one stalwart cottager rose and made for the door. It was a sig nal for a general movement. The elec tors bore the candidate no ill-will— they simply filed out. He wiped Ills brown, and turned in despair to the chairman. "What does it mean?" he asked. "I called them to liberty, and they turn their backs on me!" "It means," said the chairman, "that they fully appreciate your prin ciples, but it is nearly ten o'clo...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In Trouble Again. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

In Trouble Again. Traveller (to an Irishman): Well, Milce, I see you have a small garden. "Yes, sorr!" "What are you going to set In it for next season?" "Nothing, sorr. I set it with pota toes last year, and not one of them came up." "That's strange. How do you ex plain it?" "Well, sorr, the man next door to me set his garden full of onions." "Well, had that anything to do "WlUi yuur puUituea uvt - svo-rrlitg "Yes, sorr. Be'dad, them onions was that strong that my potatoes couldn't see to' grow for their eyes water ing!"

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Persuasive Tongue. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

A Persuasive Tongue. " At school in Cornwall, Mr. Rudyard Kipling, never a brilliant scholar, was known as "Gigs" (i.e., "gig-lamps," meaning spectacles), ami was esteem ed because he won the confidence of an austere spinster who kept, the lo cal tuckshop, with the help of three cats. She hated the college youths, grudgingly took their cash, and stern ly denied them credit. But "Gigs" went round one day, and, while his companions were bursting vitii sub dued laughter, he blandly "talked cat" to the old lady, and succeeded in win ning her confidence to such an extent that his name—the only one—was placed 011 her books.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

Premier Coach Factory & Shoeing Forge R. Boston Coichbuilder and. General 'Blacksmith, Radovick-St.., KORUMBU'RA TELEPHONE' £TO 11. Vehicles of every desci*ii)iiuii built to order REPAIRS PROMl'TITY EXECUTED. TIRING DONE DAILY. — Painting A Trinimiug done at shortest notice Newand Second-hand Buggies cheaper than" Melbourne SHOEING DONE BY -A. First-class Shoeing Smith Strong^ Comfortable and Reliable Motor Cm Sox S&le, SUBSCRIBE TO THE - G-re at ■ AdYOcate. IEST-A-IBIjISIEIEI} 1889. TELEPHONF 3STO. 16. Published Every Thursday Morning'. ; v Circulated entensively throughout the Shires of Pnowoug and Jeetho, Phillip : Island and Woolamii, Woorayl (p«rt) . and Oranhourne (put). The Oldest Paper in South Gippslarid. Subscription—j; Jj £ *££££2. - Advertising > Correspondence Charges Always Moderate Invited. A LITERARY SUPPLEMENT of an exceptionally high order of merit. is issued each week with the G.S. ADVOCATE A thrilling Serial of absorbing iuterest is one of ihe ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. CREAM GRADING. TESTING FOR ITS ACIDITY. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 14 May 1914

DAIRYING. CREAM GRADING. TESTING FOR ITS ACIDITY. The question of the hour in dairy ng circles is the grading of crcnrn, She payment for cream on its quality, 4n.d the ascertaining of the degree ol icicity in the cream received at the out" or factory. In order to show the grades and the method pursued in th« Imtcd States wo reprint the following itemB from the " Chicago Dairy l'r< iuoe ": — First Grade Cream —First grad< ;re:im is that which does not havo an i excessive amount of acid. It should test not loss than 30 per cent, butter fat, and should havo a sweet, cloati 8avour. The acidity or sourness ol the cream can he determined by th« alkaline tablet cream test, and th« odours and other flavours by the sens* of taste and smell of the station ope rator. Second Grade Cream.—This is 6oui cream that has no undesirable fiavoui or odours, or which tests less than 3t per cent, luitter-fnt. Butter-fat in this grade of cream is worth lesB than in No, 1 cream. Unsale...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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