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Title: Talbot Leader Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 9,305 items from Talbot Leader, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

" It the blood is diseased, the body is diseased." — Remember that the blood whether pure or impure, circulated through the organs of the human body Lungs, Heart, Stomach, Kidneys, Brain. If it laden with poisonous matter it spreads disease on its course. In cases of Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Skin and Blood Diseases, Pimples, and Sores of all kinds, the effects of Clarke's Blood Mixtures are marvellous. Thou- | sands of wonderful cures have been ; effected by it. Clarke's Blood Mixture is sold everywhere at 2s 9d per bottlle. i eware of worthless imitations and sub stitutes _

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ONLY JOKING. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

ONLY JOKING. The following incident occurrecf re-d cently on the down1 mail train between : Lahore and Amballa. There were Ave European passengers in a first-class ! reserved carriage. The guard of the j train was an Eurasian of pronouncedly dark complexion, but a smart and in telligent man at his work for all that. One of the first class passengers, who ; was a bounder, thought he would take a rise out of the guard, so, calling him to the carriage, said: "I say, guard,' I've got a hat here, a . real silk bow ler, complete in case which I recently purchased from an outfitter's of Bom bay. It cosli me 30 rupeesr and the only fault about it is tbat it is a trifle too small for me. Judging by the size of your head, it will probably fit you. Would you -mind, accepting it'/" The guard, gratified at the prospect of such a present, readily expressed acceptance. .The passenger, holding the hat over the panel of the carriage, said, "Here you are, guard; here's the hat,-case and all, but just...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Checkmated. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

Checkmated. - As-most .people Jcnow, when travel ling by tvaiii in America,' the pasieh-:] gep .at the depotiof .departure hands'; oyer, his luggage-to .the-officials, r'aifd on 'liayment of;''fee' receives a metal? check,* which-heloreturns in exchange for. his trunks .on .arrival at his des tination. The system has its advan tages,* hut-also its drawbacks prob afcly,tthe -fetaU oiie of loss of the checks, for the baggage "master will only hand over the luggage on receipt of the vouchers. A leading light of. English .Comic Opera, Miss C.P.,'was going from New York to Philadelphia to join a com pany. Like a prudent young lady, she packed away her dollar bills in her swanbill corsets, but her baggage checks she had left in her pocket. Pre sently she fell asleep and did not ful- j ly awake till, in a "semi-dozy" state. j she fancied she felt a slight pull at her dress. Opening her eyes she I found that a very gentlemanly looking man was sitting next to her. She put her hand in her poc...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

Doctor (with ear to patient's chest^i \ ;There's a: curious - swelling^ oyer;;;.the region of the heart, sir, which must be reduced at once. Patient (anxiously): That swelling is my pocket-book, doctor. "Please don't reduce it too much. Attend to the matter which is be fore thee, whether it is an opinion or an act or a word. . Honor is an old-'world thing, but it smells sweet to" those in-whose hand it is strong. urwnlt ^ui/re OjOxyxL tea, oO> cJuzafi \jxrw cam. ^it

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WINTER CARE. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

winter: care. The season is at hand that is the hardest on our ever faithful friend the horse. . ,The raw, damp,v windy or extreme cold weather, together with a little neglect, may cause the loss of a valu able horse. '■ .. When a horse comes in wet from work or drive, rub him welL and cover with a warm woollen blanket. Always change to a dry -blanket when the horse has cooled. Rub the legs well with a wisp of straw or a towel. Every horse is more or less warm when he comes in from a drive. Never strip off the harness or saddle and let the horse rush into a feed of oats or a trough- of water. Never give water or oats to a liorse until he has been in the stable some time, and has had some hay. This is a sane and safe practice and much loss can be avoided by en forcing it. Change the bit of the horse with the sensitive mouth. Take off the check, or let it out. Try a large rub ber-covered bit. If the- horse "drives on one line," look to his teeth at once; a sharp tooth is usually: the ...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WARTS ON TEATS. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

WARTS ON TEATS. Many people fail to get rid of warts because they think it can only be done with great difficulty, or by tearing the wart bodily away, but this is not the case. When cows are milked twice a day it does not seem to afford much opportunity to get rid of warts. To use any substance of a poisonous nature for the wart is dangerous in many ways. When the teats are chapped only, some kind of soothing ointment should be applied, and for this pur pose carbolised vaseline, and other preparations may be procured from the chemist. This will heal the teat up in a short time, and allow the milk ing to be carried on without any dis comfiture to the cow. In the case of warts, when small they can generally be got rid of by touching them with caustic soda. An other simple remedy, and one which in many cases has been found to be successful; rub the wart with vinegar, then while it is still wet dust it with dry carbonate of soda. If this is done after each milking, the warts will gradua...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VETCHES OR TARES. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

VETCHES OR TARES. Vetches or tares are of two distinct kinds—those sown in the autumn for spring or early summer use, and those sown in the spring which come in after the winter sowing is used up. There are few crops which yield such a large amount of succulent green food, though perhaps for special pur poses other crops are preferable, but for general use and under all condi tions tares cannot be beaten. The amount of seed required per acre is about three bushelp of tares and one bushel of oats or rye, the latter beini? sown to keep the tares off the ground somewhat and so prevent rotting in wet weather. In order to gain the . full benefits from growing this green crop the sow ings should be made at different inter vals, beginning as early as possible, when the land can be prepared, so that successive cuttings are obtained without allowing them to become ripe. Tares are more suitable for soiling purposes than grazing,as this latter plan is very wasteful, much of the food being tram...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. CULLING OUT POOR COWS. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

DAIRYING. CULLING OUT POOR COWS. I An English dairying authority says: The elimination of the worthless ani mals should be one of the chief ob jects of the cow keeper. I Milk records kept carefully and sys tematically furnish reliable informa tion which enables a cow keeper to de | tect these worthless animals; and it pays him to dispose of them at once. , There are some farmers, of course, j who may be tempted to rely wholly ! oil their own judgment as far as the 'milking capacities of any cow is con cerned; but guess-work of this kind can teach nothing what it costs to feed cows, nor whether such food is being economically fed in relation to the average quantity of milk produced. Milk, producers need to study this question of cost of food in relation to milk yield very carefully indeed. The fact is clear that a cow giving, say, S00 gallons per annum costs practic ally no more to feed than one which only gives 600 gallons; yet, compara tively speaking, there is a loss of £6' on the...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

II. The letter staggered Hugh, and his I perplexity increased the more, he thought upon it. Well done or ill-done, he felt it-his duty to let Leila know exactly ' ;what had happened, and to let her know immediately, If Bhe charged him with a breach of trust, i he knew he would not defend him self with success, for had he not pledged his word to her, and would a woman helieve him? Upon the oth er side was the wisdom of Geraldine. How shrewd she had been; how quick to do the right thing! He- began to see that all his heroics in the prison were so much vain-glorious nonsense, and would never have stood the test of reason. It would have been mad ness to have carried away the lad upon the yacht, and opinion would have condemned both man and wife. Geraldine had solved the riddle. Hr had yet to learn what pri"e of Leila's affections he must pay for her wit. Would Leila condemn him. He re membered her sweetness, her deBpair, the gentle sorrow she had made so brave an effort to hide from him...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XIII. The Price of Silence. I [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

- CHAPTER XIII-. The Price of Silence. I Hugh returned to the Carlton Ho tel at a quarter to five.. He was a little surprised not to find Geraldine there; but he imagined that she might have taken Desdy to the Hippodrome or to Maskelyne's—she who had such little taste for all theatrical shows herself. Had she done so, it would I have been a. new victory for this ama zing child, who seemed able to bring anybody to his feet, and had already conquered naif the staff at the Carlton —while he was an eternal source of wonder to the matchless Joseph. Hugh was well aware of Geraldine's real affection for him, but he began to think that never would he have her favor for Leila, -but for the untoward circumstances of these later days. There are some women -who can live a whole lifetime upon, a volcano of profound emotions, and. yet-never let the world see so much, as a wraith of smoke above the inscrutable mount. Geraldine..was just such a woman. There were circumstances whereun der she would ...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GENERAL CARE AND FEEDING. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

GENERAL CARE AND FEEDING. No branch of dairy farming ia more important than the feeding and treat ment of cows; yet none is more gen erally neglected. The direct influence of what the cow eats and drinks upon the milk she produces cannot be too strongly impressed upon the attention of the farmer. Of equal importance are the conditions under which food and drink are taken. If cows are chased by dogs or over-driven, or wor ried by boys on. their way to pasture, their milk will surely show the effects in a deterioration of quality. If their shelter in winter or shade in summer is insufficient, or the food is not suf ficiently nutritive, the penalty will in variably be paid in a smaller milk yield. These restrictions are inevi table. One of the greatest mistakes far mers make is in supposing that they may with impunity keep their cows on "short commons" during the win ter and that they will fatten up in the spring, and milk as well as ever. A cow reduced to meagreness by semi starvation...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BUSY BEE [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

■ THE BUSY BEE Winter is close upon us. In the coolest of our districts bees have al ready retired, and before the montn is out'the retirement will be general. During the warmer portions of the days, especially if the sun is bright, :the bees will still venture out, but they will not wander far from home ii last , month's advice has been at tended to, i.e., if they are supplied with sufficient honey to carry them ori' till spring; or the coming breeding season. If bees are forced to go for aging on bright winter days, the sud den atmospheric changes prevent the return of many, and a good supply of food in the hive is the only remedy. It also forms one of the best methods to keep up the warmth of the hive. On every occasion when the weather is bright and, drying, remove the wraps, etc., from the hives, and spread them out to dry. External dampness produces internal dampness, which is one of the most prolific causes of di sease. Just before sundown return the protections to the hives....

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCOURING CALVES. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

SCOURING CALVES. From experiments carried out in Germany it is claimed to have been discovered that sour milk given to calves from the first to the fifth day of their lives, forms an excellent pre- | ventive of scour. The constant losses I —sometimes of valuable pedigree j calves—are well known in most herds, | and are attributed to the curdling of the milk in the stomach. The bacteria in sour milk are supposed to act bene ficially. In Germany it is called yog hurt, produced by adding Bacillus bul garicus to milk. This generates lac tic acid in the stomach of the calves, which acts as a disinfectant, and pre vents the development of the hurt ful bacteria, and at the same time sti mulates the activity of the intestine, probably by producing a ferment that destroys the bacilli which give rise to scour.

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIAN DAIRYING. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

AUSTRALIAN DAIRYING. Within the past ten years the dairy cows of Australia have increased from one million to above two millions. The butter produced in a single year reach ed about 200,000,000 lbs. The annual export is valued at between £3,000,000 and £4,000,000. No rural industry in Australia is more progressive and none pays larger returns to the farmers. The mainstay of dairying is the ecport market, and ..easily the largest con sumers of Australian butter abroad are the people of the United Kingdom. It might be thought that the expense of carrying butter from Australia to London would be a serious handicap upon butter-making in the Common wealth. As a matter of fact, however, the Australian dairy farmer, in point of cost, is as close to London as the dairy farmers of Ireland or Scotland. The actual contract price of shipping butter from either Melbourne or Syd ney to London is ^ d. per lb.

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"My Mother's Eyes" [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

"My Mother's Eye6." A newspaper recently invited its' readers to state in a few words what they considered the most beautiful thing in the world. The first prize was awarded to the sender of the answer, "The eyes of , my mother." I "The dream of that which we )-now i to be impossible," suggested an ima ginative person, and this brought him second prize. But the most amusing thing was that which read— "The most beautiful thing in the world is to see a man carrying his mother-in-law across a dangerous riv er .without making any attempt to drop her in."

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DUTCHMAN AND DOG. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

DUTCHMAN AND DOG. A Dutchman, addressing his dog Snyder, said: "Schnyder, vy don't you vork some? You vas only a dog, but I visli I vas you. Ven you go mit your bed in you shust turn round dree dimes and lay ■lown; ven I go mit de bed in I haf to lock up de blace, and wind up de clock, I and put de cat out, and ondress my self, an& my frou vakes up and scold, len de baby she vakes up and cries, ..nd I hav to valk her mid de house round; den maybe ven I gets myself to bed in it is dime to get up again. Ven you get up you shust. stretch your neck a leedle and you vas up. I haf to light de vire, put on de kittle, scrap some mit my vife already and get my self breakfast. You play round all clay and has blenty fun. I haf to vork all day and hav blenty druble. Den ven you die you vas dead. Ven I die I hav to go to de bad place al» ready yet."

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

CLOSER SETTLEMENT FARM ALLOTMENTS \ppIication is invited for Farming Areas on the Undermentioned Estates— Estate. District. Nerrin Nerrin Streatham 12 Mt. Widderin Skipton & Pannoo Echuca 4 Marathon and Wiliow Grove Echuca 4 Cremona Yea 6 Eumeralla Hamilton 2 Allambee Yarragon 16 Moybu Wangarattm 2 Bona, Xista Warragul 8 No. of Allotments Available. 1 Suitable for wheat growing and sheep farming. Suitable for dairying and mixed farming. Kilmahy Park" Sale - 9 - i Dairying and Bolsdaie . Maffra - , 16 f Beet Growing. Allotments suitable for Agricultural Laborers', Workmen's and Clerke' H6me8 are "available as under:— Agricultural Laborers*—Allambee Estate, 2 allotments. tr Workmen's Homes, Pender's Grove Estate, allotments. 4 allotments; Bona Vista, 3 All Crown grants which may be Issued to the leasee at the c d of any half-year after the first twelve years have expired, on payment of the balance of the purchase money, will be subject to a condition that the owner for the tim...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PODDER CROPS FOR POOR SANDY SOILS. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

PQD&ER mOP8 FOR POOR SANDY SOILS. Among the plants -which can be ad vantageously .grown on poor, sandy soils is millet. There are two species, the yellow Lupinus lutens) and the blue. .The yellow lupin is the more succulent, and covered with more, and larger, leaves than the blue, is gener ally preferred to the latter, especiallj if grown for green food and not fox feed." The blue lupins are grown prin cipally for seed, which, like those oi all leguminous plants, constitute a very nutritious food, and in their com position and nutritive qualities, so fai as these have been ascertained, do not differ much from peas and lentils. The yellow is grown chiefly for the purpose of providing green fodder foi sheep and cattle. The field culture oi lupins is'caried on principally in those districts where the soils refuse tc srrow any nutritious grasses, and that, indeed, furnish only the scantiest sup ply of inferior green food. Sheep and cattle soon get accus tomed to lupins, and afte...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

THEY STAND AT THE TOP "JHUPMOBILE 16-32 H.P. LONG STROKE, HIGH POWER. SPECIALY ADAPTED to AUSTRALIAN CONDITIONS. £360 to £450. "SWIFT" 11-9, 13-9 and 15-9 H.P. SPEEDY, SMART, COSY, RELIABLE £450 to £595. 99 "STRAKER-SQUIRE (lS-20 H.P. (One Model Only.) The Finest Car at Last London Olympia. The result of years of Concentrated Energy. Price, £650 to £700. g WE ALSO STOCK ""AIRES," "ABBOTT," and "VALVELESS" CARS. Willys-Utility, Garford and Hupmobile Commercial Vehicles. - A card from you will bring Fullest Particulars per return. DENNYS LASCELLES LTD., FOR QUALITY AND ECONOMY GEELONG: GHERINGHAP STREET. MELBOURNE: 618-24 ELIZABETH STREET. 'Phone - 1582. 'Phone - 5306. A Bracing Tonic Fuller & Johnson Farm Pimp Engine. A small portable engine that can be used to work any hand-power machine. Place it where you want it, with out any special fixings, and it will work without any at tention and at the cost of one penny per hour. Hitch it. to -your pump, separator, winnower, churn,...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Leila and Her Lover. (All Rights Reserved.) IV. [Newspaper Article] — Talbot Leader — 2 May 1914

jlleila and Her Lover* By MAX PEMBERTON. Published b>\ Arrangement with Ward, j Lock and.; Co. Ltd., Loudon and Melb; r (All Rights Reserved.) ' : IV. Itjyas half-past'three when he ar rived at the prison—oddly enough the first time he had entered one in all his life.. All the great traditions of the house of Donald had to do with the activities of manhood, war, the chase, the camps and courts of kings. He had known Aberfeldy Castle for a home since he had been a little lad,, had found his childish kingdom on the wild moorland or by the rugged sea-! shore. He knew little of cities, less of the sordid phases of twentieth cen tury life. London had been for him a vast theatre wherein he had seen, the show from the boxes rather than from the stalls—while of the pit he had hut' the vaguest impressions. To such a man a prison stood at the nadir of life's purpose. He remember ed once seeing a poor woman in Aber feldy who had returned from Edin burgh gaol, and he recalled the fur tive ho...

Publication Title: Talbot Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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