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Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral,... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 118,866 items from Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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White Julienne Soup. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

White Julienne Soup. j.iik aiucic ror trim soup can be made out of the remains of cold rabbit or fowl ; should none of these be obtain able, a knuckle hono of veal, together with a ham bone, boiled for a few houis with the ordinary flavouring, will pro viae a quart or so or gelatinous' stock Cut white turnips and carrots Into thin slice'?, and cut these agafn in match-like strips ; treat a few spring onions in the same way, and throw all Into a pan of boiling water, together with a few very young peas When tender, drain off the water ? add the vegetables to your stock sprinkle In a mere pinch or two flnely mlnced parsley and green mint ; boil up once, and serve. '.???.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Watching for the Dead. Hunting Bodies at the Niagara Falls. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Watching for the iJead. Hunting Bodies at the Niagara Falto. Tiiere exists at Niagara K'aiis ana along the river from that point to Lake Ontario .an industry the like of which cannot probably be found in the civilised world. ? In his character of Rogue Rider .hood, Dickens lias portrayed a man who eked out an existence by robbing the dead bodies of unfortunates who had mot death in the muddy waters of the Thames, or had been thrown into the stream to conceal a greater crime, but to him and his kind the corpses had no interest, aside from any valuables they might have upon their persons. At the falls, however, dead bodies have a mar ketable value, and it is the business of Jinn tors for ' floaters,' as they are called, that constitutes so unique an in dustry. Yet the occupation is a perfectly legiti mate one. The bodies are not despoiled in any way by the mSn who pursue this occupation, and there is little doubt that they are as honest a set as can be found anywhere. They do not sell...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Self-poisoning by Chloroform. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Self-poisoniiiR by Chloroform Few practices are at once more per nicious and more common than ? auto intoxication by means of chloroform. Within a week two persons have done themselves to death by inhaling chloro form. Mr. P. 0. Banks, as a result of a poisoned wound inflicted by pricking his pain. It appears from the evidence of his wife that he inhaled chloroform to obtain relief. It is almost Incredible that this man had for eighteen months received regularly daily at his house 2oz. of chloroform for auto-intoxication. He poured a small quantity upon a paper, cone and Inhaled it. The wife awaken ed to find the unfortunate man comatose and stertorous, and from this state he never recovered. It seems to us per fectly monstrous that the victim should ever1 have had the chloroform supplied to him. The laity kuow so little of the perils! of inhaling anaesthetics that they . ought? at least to be protected from theinselves and others equally incom petent to administer the drug.- In 'th...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Great Firefly. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

The Circat Firefly. The great firefly (Blater noctilucus) is an Inhabitant of the savannahs of most of the warmer parts of America anC the West India is lands. It is snid to attain a length of an inch and a-half. In the gloom of night tbeso flies are extremely luminous and the effect is brilliant. The light chiefly proceeds from four parts— namely, from two glandular spots be hind the eyes and one under each wing. They have the power to cut off! the light at will, in which case the glandular spots become perfectly opaque. The light of this wonderful in sect' by Itself is such that if the creature belioid In the palm of the .hand . print or manuscript is as easily read as by a candle.. The ? aboriginal natives cage tliese creatures and make use of them,, it Is; alleged, as lanterns. : Ladles adorn themselves with this electric-light lu minary. It Is related of Don Domingo Conde -of Colombia thafche would appear on the evenine nrotnenade with .a large; firofly ornamenting the buckle o...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Home. Sleep. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

The Home. Sleep. .mere nre .jew tnings more coveted than the ability to sleep quietly and natu rally, and it is very rare indeed that one guts too much of this kind of repose. No doubt there are persons of sluggish habit, and people who are given to over indulgence at the table, which is produc tive of inaction and an almost continu ous sleepy condition : but these are exceptions rather than the rule. Tho majority of people sleep too little, and it is scarcely worth while, save in ex ceptional cases, to curtail the hours that Nature demands for this most ollicient means of restoration. Above all things should children and youngpor.son.s— those under 20 especially— be given all the op portunity consistent with their occupa tion and education for untroubled sleep. The fact that Nature deintiiuls a thing is most excellent reason for granting it. ' Forty winks' may do very well for some temperaments, but it ir* by no means to be recommended to persons who are in any degree weary or over...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Short Story. Billy's Ruse. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

i Short Story. r;V: , Billy's Ruse. Billy) Weldon lounged up to the Couuty Clerk's desk with a handful , ?/ of silver and a face full of mystery. \ The mystery dissolved to embarrass ment when, obedient to his loudly ' ' whispered request, the clerk handed him 'Say! You'll keep Mils dark for me — - ?— won't yon, please V' lie said entreat ingly, fingering the document as though It were a serpent. ' Of course— if you say so,' the func tionary returned, smiling. ' What's up, Billy V Got to run away with your girl V' ___ - - ? ''--? -C-tz-~**££&w 1 'Wislit I had— 'twould be ' - , easier ! Yes, a sight easier,' Billy re turned, ..mopping his forehead hard. ' You see, it's this way— pap's dead agin r- ' marryin'. I've done hired ter him fer the whole year, and I don't see how I'm ever goin' tor steal time tor slip round ami sit tliu .passon, then streak it ter the Wid^/ bViison's and wait till Sairy hac^'*'^flno her wedding frock.' Cv' ' Why not ^ait for Christmas ?' '?Tlint whs ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Sketcher. Marriage in Madagascar. The Ceremonies of a Somewhat Peculiar Character. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

The Sketclier. Marriage in Madagascar*. The Ceremonies of a Somewhat Peculiar Character. We have hoard a great deal about the war in Madagascar, but very little has boon said about its inhabitants, customs, and superstitions. Some of the latter are very strange. Its inhabitants, so far as the' women are concerned, offer an Interesting study, especially at the present moment, when the ' New Woman' is so very much in evidence as to call forth vituperation from the lU/^ll^Ub UlgiilUU ICO VI C.11U WUUlljli. The Hovas are no longer savages. They are subject to laws and regula tions, and obey an absolute authority which presides over their political ?destinies and determines their social condition. This power is vested in the queen, and though in reality she wields no visible power in the actual ruling of the country, yet her influence is so great on the minds of her subjects that . nothing, even the most unimpor tant action, happens in their lives in .which her name is not mingled, in wh...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How to Obtain Umbrellas Cheap. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

How to Obtain Umbrellas Cheap. Scene — Lost Property Office at the Vic toria Cross Terminus of the East Western Railway. '?, . Act I. . ; A fashionably-dressed lady enters. ' ' Lady : ' I left, an umbrella in the ladies' first-class waiting-room yesterday after noon. Have you got it here ?' Attendant : ' What sort'Of an umbrella Is it, ma'am ?' LlitUf . XL ilcLB n. 1M11B CUUJiy llrt.llUlC with a silver mount. Silk.'' Attendant (bringing forward a bundle of umbrellas) : Is it among: these ?' Lady (after scrutinising them care fullyi : ' No ; I'm afraid some one has appropriated it. Perhaps you will take my name and a description of the um brella, In case It should be found. (At tendant writes.) I suppose you get quite a number of umbrellas here ?' Attendant : ' Yes, ma'am : we does.' Lady (pointing to a lady's umbrella with an ivory handle, gold mount, and monogram ' P.M.') : '.' What a beauty this is !' Attendant : ' Yes : that was found this morning in the Continental express.' Lad...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
He Got Even. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

° He Got Even. .Salesman :' Yes, I suppose the news paper business is rather interesting ; but. then I should think there must be many objectionable experiences you have to go through — this Interviewing, for example.' Journalist : ' Rather ; but then, you know, we always get the beat of a fellow who cuts up rough. There was old Mor tarboard, for instance. I oalled at his true that he was In the habit of beating his wife.' Salesman : ' Thunder ! What did he say ?' Journalist : ' Didn't say a word ; he simply kicked me off the stoop. But I came out ahead, as usual. Next morn Ing old Mortarboard had the pleasure of reading this : ' A representative of the ' Auger' called upon ProfoBsor Mortar board laBt evening to ascertain the truth of the prevalent and apparently well authenticated rumours of the habit In dulged In by the professor of beating bis wife In a most brutal manner. Pro fessor Mortarboard was, for some reason best known to himself, very guarded In his language, and absolut...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Make the Children Happy. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Make the Children Happy. Women should do their utmost to se cure that the childhood of their boys and girls shall be as happy as outward cir cumstances render possible. Every mother should make a study in the ar'b of creating happiness In her children. That art cannot be learned from books ; it comes from the inspiration of a divine unselfishness. Poverty is no bar to its attainment. Happiness is at all times 'a pearl not of the Indian but of the empyrean ocean,' but the mother who tries so to love ' as to go to heaven every day,' will be sure to bring it thence and impart it to her little ones. — Archdeacon Farrar, in ' Woman's Work in the Home.'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How a Man Should Treat His Sister-in-law. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

How a Man Should Treat His Sisterin law. Men are often placed in some little difficulty as to how they should treat their wives' sisters, especially if they have never had any sisters of their own. Indeed, sisters-in-law expect a little dif ferent treatment, even from what sisters do ; a legal relationship cannot replace the early' associations of family life; and an intimacy founded In later years nover becomes quite the same. Sisters in-law expect a little more deference than sisters do, while they have the same brotherly affection. A man calls UIs sisters-in-law by their Christian names, and may even be supposed to kiss them when occasion demands, as lie would his sisters. They can render him many kindly attentions and services, and he, on his part, should always be willing. to do the same for them. If a man Is fond of his wife, ho generally feels kindlj' towards her family, ?' nnt\ wants to stand on agreeable terms with them. Some husbands have a disagree^ able way , of not liki...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Men Whom Women Never Forget. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Men Whom Women Neyer Forget. Somebody oiice drew a comparison be: tween a man's memory in love matters, and a woman's. . He showed that a wo-' man's was 'beyond doubt the longest, because, though a man sometimes forgot the very name of an early sweetheart, and even feels a little vagUe about a girl he had supposed himself to be in 1UVK WHIZ 111 lliuyn lukCL 111.C, ' tiuiuuu never lost from her tender memory one possible detail about every lover she had had, even when they were in round jackets. . 5fhis Is undoubtedly true. The man whom : a woman once loves has taken a place in her heart too firm and fixed for him ever to be dislodged, and, even when she has not returned his love, the fact that ho has loved her establishes a claim upon her gratitude that can never afterwards be wiped out. But it is not only the man who loves her, and whom she loves, that a. woman never forgets. There is a special type of man who se cures a place in her memory quite apart from that bestowed upon him b...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Others Said "Six." [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Tho Others Said ' Six.' Jjittle Willie, aged nine years, who attends a private school where prizes are given oh all sorts of subjects, but who had as yet never earned a prize, came home one afternoon and exhibited proudly one of these rewards of merit. ' Good !' said his mother, ' bat how did jruu gam it t ' I was the first in natural history,' replied little Willie. The proud mother was astonished at thiB mark of intelligence in her son, and on inquiring what the question was, Willie said lhat he had been aBked how many legs a horse had, and had replied 'five,' and so gained the prize. ' But a horse has not five legs, child I' said the mother. 'I know it, bub all the others said 'aix.'.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Side By Side. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

_ Side By Side. xiii3 quuuii true story trom aoroBB Ino Atlantic shows a tender remembrance of spouse number one under new matri monial conditions. Sallie and Hiram were married after a brief courtship. He was. seventy-five and she was seventy-Bix years old. As he apologetically said, he was ' tired of diggin' clams and shuokin' on em out, an ma km a chowder, an' then sottin' down alone to eat.' So he sold his houae and moved over to Sallie's. The first thing to be put in place was an old sun-bonnet, which he hung in the en try- way, saying to Sallio : 'I couldn't be oontented no way if I didn't see Betsy Ann's bunnit hangin' up there, Sallie.' ' Well,' says she, ' I shall go straight up to the garret for Joshua's old hat, which I was decent enough to put away when I knew you were coming here.' And so she did ; and JosIiuu'b old hat and BetBV Ann's 'bunnit ' hang sido by side at the present day, as tender a tribute, perhaps, as flowers placed on the earth above a resting-place.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Stood to Reason. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Stood to Reason. The great oriminal lawyer was defend ing a man indicted for laroeny. An old feud existed between the lawyer and the prosecuting attorney, and they neglected no opportunity to hit eaoh other. ' Gentlemen of the jury,' pleaded the lawyer, ' in determining this case let me caution you to bear this one faot in mind. my cnenc is a poor man. While we admit he was tempted to steal, it was only when he waB in the last extremity hungry, in fact. ' Think what any man might do who suddenly found himself alone in the world and penniless.' The prosecuting attorney, remember ing that the great oriminal lawyer was noted for his greed, saw his opportunity, and replied : 1 That is a very pretty picture you have just heard drawn, gentlemen of the jury ; but everyone knows that if the prisoner waB really without a penny, the counsel for the defence would never be defending. him.' * .

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Papa Knew What to Say. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Papa Knew What to Say. xnere waB suence tor a moment. Presently she spoke, and the tone of voice ahe used was tremulous and plead ing. 'Dick, dearest, do — do you overdrink?' Reluctantly he admitted that there lessly upon the wine while it wob red. 'Ah, dearest,' she continued, with anxiety depicted on her lovely face, ' what do you suppose papa would say if he should discover that his only daughter's future husband drank ?' ' He discovered it yesterday afternoon,' replied Dick, with the same reluctance. 'Oh! And what did he say?' she asked, breathlessly. ' He said,' made answer the young man — 'he said, 'Dick, my boy, mine's the same, with a dash of bitters I' There was silence for a moment ? perhaps two or three moments.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Clean and Dacent. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

Clean and Dacent. A short time ago, during the course of a conversation between two working men's wives at a country town not far from Sydney, one chanced to remark that her hue band always put on a clean shirt on Sunday morning. The other replied : ' Well, I nivver cares much about Sundays, but I always sues that he has a olean shirt on ivvery Saturday afthornoon, 'cos that's the time he giuner.illy gets drinkin'; an' iv he should tak' his coat oil to fight, I like him to look clean and dacent 1' Luck jb a good thing to have, bat it ie a poor thing to wait for,

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Poor Mother." [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

'Poor Mother.' The filial affection of the Chinese has passed into a proverb. A Chinaman of forty, who had a very passionate mother, frequently reoeived from her a sound thrashing, whioh he bore with great resignation. VtlO VA»J MO IDUDITDU U bJllUHUHlg |I1 EliO presence of a friend, and, when his irate parent had departed, he burst into tears, exclaiming : ' My poor mother did not thrash mo half so soundly to-day as sho used to do I Poor creature, her strength is declining fast, and I am exceedingly afraid that I shall soon lose her I'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
For Charity's Sake. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

For Charity's Sake. Plodding wearily through Hay, a lazy« out-of-work 'Murrumbidgeo whaler' at last approached a large house occupied by a wealthy old lady, who he had been told was of a very generous disposition. She, on hearing his tale of poverty, gave him a loaf ot bread, with the crsuuI remark ' that sho gave it not for his eako, nor for her own sake, 'but for charity's sake.' ' Then,' replied the 'whaler,' with a reproachful look in his face, ' for charity's aike put a lump of butter on, mum I1

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANARCHISM. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 9 November 1898

; '.' ANARCHISM. The ahaVahists threaten the life of ™ ' ' llie Italian Premier. * ' - - They also threaten to cause an ex ?^ ,.- iploaionia the bjildinp where. the inter national conference for the repression '\. - , ' o£ anarch ia'. a is held- ?

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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