ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
WHOLESALE DESTRUCTION OF BIRDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WHOLESALE DESTRUCTION OF BIRDS. The three keepers of the lighthouse at Cape   Griznez (France) have been fined £2 for poaching,   by spreading nets to catch the birds attracted by   the reflectors of the lantern. It was stated dur-   ing the hearing of the case that no fewer than   5914 birds were captured between October 10 and   14, the majority being larks, thrushes, and corn-   crakes.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHRISTMAS P.O.O.—£113,000. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

CHRISTMAS P.O.O.—£113,000.   The Christmas mails from New York to Europe last year was the largest ever known— by some 600 bags. The aggregate number of bags was 6,000, one shipment alone weighing 100 tons. Thirty seven thousand seven hundred pounds' worth of money orders were carried by the Lucania, which brought a solely English mail, while the German boats, which supply the whole of the Continent, carried P.O.O.'s to the value of £75,500.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
£10,000 FOR CAISTER WIDOWS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

£10,000 FOR CAISTER WIDOWS.   Over £10,000 has been raised for the relief of   the sufferers by the Caister lifeboat disaster, full   particulars of which have already appeared in   "The World's News," and the fund has been   closed.   Allowances of 12s a week are to be made to   the widows or widowed mothers of victims, and 2s   6d to the children until they attain the age of   16 years.   The three survivors of the disaster are to re-   ceive gratuities of £20 each.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUICIDE HALL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

SUICIDE HALL. A telegram from New York states that under the new moral wave that has swept over the metropolis, evidence of which was shown in the recent downfall of Tammany Hall, several of the   gambling dens of the lower quarter of the city have been closed. One of the most notorious, known as "Suicide Hall," conducted by John H. McGuirk, in the Bowery, has lost so much money since the election that it has been sold to a man who will model it into a German family resort. It acquired its name through the many suicides there of young girls in 1890.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SILKEN ARMOR. A POLISH INVENTOR'S SAFEGUARD AGAINST BULLET AND DAGGER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

SILKEN ARMOR. A POLISH INVENTOR'S SAFEGUARD AGAINST BULLET AND DAGGER. Ian Szczepanik, the now famous Polish inven- tor, formerly a poor schoolmaster in Galicia, has added, by the new dagger and bullet proof vest, one more to the list of his many inventions.   The idea is not a new one, but the texture of the vest is. Dowe, the German, eight years ago FIRING AT THE WAISTCOAT AT THREE PACES. used the finest steel plate; Szczepanik (pronounced Schepanik) employs yellow undyed silk!   It is almost incredible that sufficient resis- tance can be obtained by such a method, but sev- eral of the youthful Pole's other inventions— particularly his photographic and electric picture weaving machine—border on tbe miraculous. It is stated that a blow from a dagger or a sharp-pointed file—it was the latter class of weapon Luccheni used against the ill- fated Empress Eli- zabeth of Austria— is repelled harm- lessly. The same may be said of a bullet fired at five paces from...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PING-PONG NECK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

PING-PONG NECK.   —♦— Ingenious observers, with an eye to the pic- turesque, have found that ping-pong has (or may be expected to have) quite a number of curious consequences, mainly for the beholder. "The ping-pong squint" is the discovery of one visitor to the tournament at Westminster. While another—the "Westminster Gazette's" re- presentative—has discovered the deadly peril of the umpire, "the new ping-pong disease—per- petual motion of the eyes." Spectators, we are told, also get swollen necks by constantly turn- ing the head from side to side in following the flight of the ball. Is ping-pong neck to succeed bicycle back and golf elbow?

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
In the Public Gaze. SOMETHING ABOUT LORD ROSEBERY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

In the Public Gaze.       SOMETHING ABOUT LORD ROSEBERY.   Lord Rosebery, whose name (says the "Ex- press") is in everybody's mouth, has the in- definable quality of interestingness. In one sense he is all mankind's epitome, for there is scarcely a side of life which he has not touched, and touched effectively.   He has been everywhere but to South Africa, although at one time he contemplated a trip to the Cape and the Transvaal, and went so far as to make full inquiry as to the sort of organisa- tion required for a journey of the kind. One, now dead, who was perhaps as sound a judge of good conversation as any critic of the day, was accustomed to declare that in a word match between the King (then Prince of Wales), Lord Rosebery, and Lord Randolph Churchill, it was difficult to say whose was the keenest mind. The King was the nimblest, Lord Randolph the most audacious, and Lord Rosebery's the keen- est thrust and the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CLEVER HEIRESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A CLEVER HEIRESS. Lady Margaret Crichton-Stuart, to whom you referred recently, is (writes a Scotch corres- pondent to the "Express") one of the most in- teresting, original, and capable girls in society. She has magnetic charm and personality. In spite of a slight lameness, she is athletic, can drive two or four horses as well as any woman in England, rides superbly, and used to be a great cyclist. But the sea is her passion, and yachting a delight that never palls. She studied naviga- tion at Greenock, and holds a master mariner's certificate. Other hobbies in which she has ren- dered herself expert are architecture and land- scape gardening. She sometimes acts, but only to the smallest audiences, and she slums in Rothesay, where she is worshipped. Her manners are not in the least modern, and in the sweeping curtsies with which she greets elders there is not the re- motest trace of self-consciousness. Lady Margaret is among the great heiresses, and celebrated her 26th birthday on ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SPANISH PRINCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A SPANISH PRINCE. The Princess of the Asturias' little boy has re- ceived the names of Alfonso Leon Andre Christine Charles Francis Xavier. All those who were pre- sent at the baptismal ceremony were given boxes of sweetmeats made of white satin ornamented with the Royal Arms. The Queen-Regent presen- ted 20,00 francs to the Consumption Hospital at Valencia and 10,000 francs to the hospital at Madrid.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROYALTY ON THE MOVE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

ROYALTY ON THE MOVE. The King has decided not to move into Buck- ingham Palace until after next Easter, when the alterations will be complete in every detail. Dur- ing the Easter recess the private effects of the King and Queen will be transferred to the Palace, and those of the Prince and Princess to Marl- borough House, though their actual occupation will not begin until May.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE COUNTESS OF MINTO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

THE COUNTESS OF MINTO. Lady Minto is one of the most popular Vice-   Queens the Old Country has sent to Canada.   She strikes a happy medium between the Royal   state that of necessity surrounded a daughter   of Queen Victoria in the early eighties, and the   pronounced democracy of Lady Aberdeen, her   immediate predecessor.     As is only seemly, the wife of the Governor-   General bears the reputation of being the best   dressed woman in Canada. She took out a be-   wildering number of pretty things in 1898,   and dazzled Ottawa society from the commence-   ment. For the visit of the Duke and Duchess of   Cornwall and York she had a number of ex-   ceedingly handsome toilettes, and one long sable   coat is almost priceless.   Lady Minto has one accomplishment tha...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LIVING LANDSCAPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

A LIVING LANDSCAPE.   A living landscape is the latest novelty for table decoration. A dwarf Japanese tree is the salient feature, and the rest is made up of rocks and mounds and mossy dells, with sometimes a stream of water full of little goldfish. The landscapes are placed in an oblong Japanese dish, from 8in. to 12in. long. Some beautiful miniature land- scapes in this style have been made by Mrs. Er- nest Hart. She has scenes from tropical lands, an Indian jungle, and a dell in Japan, not to men- tion scenes from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales. Mrs. Hart uses the very finest mosses and ferns and cacti, so that her little trees appear to be placed in the middle of a fairy landscape.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE COMING CORONATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

THE COMING CORONATION.   A great many ladies are having their jewels   re-set in view of next season's festivities, and a   well-known French jeweller has been entrusted   with a lot of work by the Queen, Lady De Grey,   Lady Kilmorey, and Mrs. George Keppel, while   Lady Galway has had a quantity of stones made   up into a stomacher, which, it is said, will be   one of the finest in the Abbey on the Coronation   Day.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ORIGINAL WEDDING DRESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

AN ORIGINAL WEDDING DRESS.     Miss Bulkeley Johnson, who married Captain   White, Lord Annaly's brother, recently, deserves   the thanks of future brides for giving them a   lead in original wedding dresses. She wore a   regular Tudor gown with slashed sleeves, trimmed   with pearls and cleverly modified to blend in with   the fashions of the day. The most strikingly new   departure, however, was a little lace cap 'cutely   arranged over the tulle veil. The picturesque   effect more than justified this daring innovation.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROYAL STOCKHOLDERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

ROYAL STOCKHOLDERS.   There is probably no American railroad which   can boast of so many stockholders of royal blood   as can the Great Northern Railway. In the   offices of this road are the signatures of the   Duke of Connaught, the Prince of Wales, the   Princess Beatrice, the Duke of Fife, the Marquis   of Lorne, and of most of the other Dukes and   Duchesses, Princes and Princesses, Marquises and   Marchionesses, in whose veins runs the tradi-   tional blue blood. The only one who holds no   stock in this road is the head of the family—   King Edward VII. Another distinguished stock- holder is "Bobs," Field-Marshal Roberts. Most   of these people were induced to invest in Great   Northern stock through the efforts of Lord     Strathcona and Mount Royal.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE VATICAN AND THE UNITED STATES. THE CATHEDRAL AT WESTMINSTER. AN ADDRESS BY THE POPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

THE VATICAN AND THE UNITED STATES. THE CATHEDRAL AT WESTMINSTER. AN ADDRESS BY THE POPE. The correspondent of the "Pall Mall Gazette"   at Rome (under date December 23) says that the   circumstance of Cuba and the Philippines falling   under the jurisdiction of the United States has   been seized upon by the Vatican to push a pro-   ject dear to Pope Leo. When he came to the pontifical throne several countries had no re- presentatives accredited to the Vatican. The   new Pontiff set himself the task of changing this. One of the powers that has always proved ob- durate is the United States, but now with Cuba and the Philippines the Catholic interests are so immense it seems that the Washington Govern- ment is not willing to dismiss the matter. The Vatican, according to the same authority, has given Washington to understand that it will gradually withdraw the friars from the Philippines, substituting America...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

Preserve your property by using Paints and     absolutely Pure Leads, under chemical analysis, supplied by Jas. Sandy & Co., 320-Geerge-St.—Ad.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO SAVE EXPENSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

TO SAVE EXPENSE. The following story is from the "Indian Medical Gazette":—A Chinese boy was brought into the Pekin Hospital terribly injured by a heavy log falling upon him. The doctors, to save his life, cut off his leg. The mother came, apparently to help to nurse the lad. The patient, however, almost immediately afterwards died, and expert examination showed his own mother had given him arsenic. Her reason, it is supposed, was to prevent her son from the disgrace of reaching the next world in a maimed condition. This is a very strong point with the Chinese, who always pickle an amputated member to have it buried with them when they eventually die. In this instance, the family being poor, and a whole leg difficult to pickle, the simpler course was taken of poisoning the boy, so that he and his leg might go to- gether.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHEN WOMEN DISAGREE. LADY FRIENDS WHO WENT TO MONTE CARLO. AND AFTERWARDS QUARRELLED ABOUT MONEY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

WHEN WOMEN DISAGREE.   —♦— LADY FRIENDS WHO WENT TO   MONTE CARLO. AND AFTERWARDS QUARRELLED ABOUT MONEY. Miss Gertrude Champion, of 122 Holbein House,   Sloane-square, sued, in the King's Bench, Lon-   don, on December 19, Mrs. Annie Hill Brough, a   married woman, of 64 York-mansions, Battersea   Park, to recover £100, money lent in the year   1898, and £200 lent in 1901. The defence as to the   £100 was that the loan had been turned into a gift, and, as to the £200, that it was lent for the   purpose of a joint gamble at Monte Carlo, and   was not recoverable.   Mr. Simmons (who appeared for plaintiff), in   the course of his opening, read a number of let-   ters from the defendant to the plaintiff couched   in most grateful and affectionate language. In   one letter she asked plaintiff n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FRENCH PRESIDENT'S PAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 February 1902

    THE FRENCH PRESIDENT'S PAY.     It is often said that the French President re- ceives no more than £24,000 a year-for his ser- vices. That is, as a matter of fact the actual salary of the head or the Republic, but it is not generally known that M. Loubet is supplied gra- tuitously with a number of household necessaries which represent in value at least a couple of thousand a year. For fruit, vegetables, game, oil, logs for his fires, gas, and electricity he pays nothing, while in addition his household linen is washed free of charge.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x