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Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Po... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 14,950 items from Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Sentinel. SATURDAY, APRIL 23rd, 1887. WEARING MOURNING. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

SATURDAY, APRIL -23rd, 1837. WEARING. MOURNING. Of all those who have endeaivoureri to effect, a reform in the custom of wearing mourning on .thie deathl oif relaties or friends, no one has been inire eariest or emphiaftic ithan was the IrtelJt eiry :WardBeecher U'oUpoi his decease last month his views in this respect were. fully carried out by his farilvy. On the .occasion of the readin?riof the. burial service it was noticed that'iltone of them were diessed in black, ? Not a bit of crape was to be seen. : It would be well if the example thlis set were generally followed. The less there,.is of. outward sign of woe and of the nmiserable tr'ip ping of ceremoni, dol,,iefulness, the greater is the prab~bility of a sincere. inward grief AnId, because the truth of this .pro1 ositionI cnuineit he 'denied.; the necessity of wearing black' whici the worl imposes an all' mourners,; is simply cruel, -It behoves the leader' of society to discard the black. Persons, of the middling ~ndlpoorer c...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Knew It All. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

ZKnew It All. You could not start a conversation, or any common-place narration, or any theme 'neath the solar course on which a mortal might converse, or anything in: the universe, but he'd explored exhaustively and 'knew the subject, root and branich; . You could not scare up any topics from the freezing poles to the sweltering tropics, from the Ho-ang-Ho to the " wondering Po " or the land of the sturdy E. kimo, but he would ope his thorax wide and pour his oral avalanche; You could not make a short digression into any science or professuon, any occult lore of the days of yore, but he had known it all before and would wind his lung at tachment up and- pout his verbal watery slush; You couldn't discuss the slightest question, or make a modest dim suggustion, but he'd catch your eye and fill your ears and talk a robust man to tears on any theme in the hemispheres, and deluge all the country round with foaming cataracts of gush I

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHICKEN CHOLERA REMEDIES. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

CHICKEN CHOLERA REMED[ES. The following area.' few simple remedies for cholera, which is one of the most fatal diseases poultry-men have to contend with: For cholera mix with- the -regular. feed enough chloride of lime to turn it a little yellow. Remove all drinking water and give wine and a mash feed mixed with the same ; three days is generally enough. Combine two ounces each of resin, alum, sulphur, and redi pepper; aid totwo quarts of scalded meal for every twenty-five fowls. One-half pound of ; sulphate or iron, one ounce` sulphuric acid, two gallons water. One teaspoonful of this mixture to-one pint of drinking water. It reddens up their combs and makes them generally healthy. Where sumac berries can be pbtained take as much water as will-cover them and let stand a day or two and put whfere they can drink freely of it. For one dozen full-grown fowls take of flower sulphur two tablespoonfuls, of salt peter one tablespoonful, of cayenne pepper one heaping tablespoonful and- gall...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Lines to Autumn. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

Lines to Autumn. Beautiful is golden Autumn, On its mellow tints I doat; But its fading hues remind me. That I want an overcoat. Very lovely are the sunsets, Turning all the fields to gold; But, alas I the coals are rising As the nights grows chill and cold. Leaves are falling in the forest OrS ngw, yellow, brown, and red; They remind me I most purchase Some now blankets for the bed.

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CALVES AND SKIM-MILK. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

CALVES AND SKIM-MILK. Prof. E. W. Steward says in the CoJuntry Gentleman that there is not much difficulty, in teaching calves to take skim-milk. He would moisten ground feed with a little sweet skim-milk. The calves will eat the ground feed after mincing a little, and get the taste of the milk. Next time make it a little more moist with milk. Proceed in this way for a few times, and they will learn to take the feed with a good deal of milk. He has never known this plan to fail. He has taught colts and horses in thin flesh to take skim-milk in this way, and found the milk very effective in restoring condition. It would be better that the niilk should be warmed. R. H. Gage, of Wisconsin, bought ten calves, grade Shorthorns, from one to three days old, and put them on to a skim milk diet .with& little oil meal and hay as soon'as they desired it. In six mon hs thesei calves weighed 3,500 pounds. Figuring hay and oil meal at regular prices, the skim milk brought .in £20. That is...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Settling Down. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

Settling Down. Little Nellie--" There, now, we're married, and I want you to go right out and order some-some coal and some wood, and some sugar, and some-some-oh, yes I some wed ding cake. I forgot about that." Little Willie-" Yes, mother-I mean, my dear-I'll go right off, but you must kiss me first." Little Nellie-"Kiss you." Little Willie--" Of course." Little Nellie-" Why, you greatbigsimple ton you; married folks don't kiss." In Vienna a law is in force that any per soni being out after ten p.m. :can be fined 10 krentzers bythlie fortunate who admits them to their dwelling. T:i 'tieets' are deserted, 'and hisbands are never detained at their clubs.. What a system of robbery can go on between "the little things that tell," the little brothers of lovers I The girl's little B. detains the young man, and his own little B. waits up to admit him after 10 o'clock; of course, the little B.s divide the spoil after wards. Thus good feeling is promoted be tween two families through a love...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Star of the Evening. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

The Star of the Evening. A policeman found two dead-beats making night hideous, and he landed them in the lockup with the utmost celerity. " Ain't your name U-Uranus ?" asked one of them. " What put that in your head?" demanded the policeman. "I thought so from-er (hic) way Uranus in." The only response was the dull sickening thud of the policeman's baton.

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A New Colonial Novel. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

A. New Colonial Novel. Mr. Robt. P. Whitworth, the well and favorably known Australian author, is "Once more into the breach, dear friends," this time with his already wonderfully success ful book " Hine-Ra, or the Maori Scout." It. is not too much to say that in this work Mr. Whitworth has surpassed most of his previ ous efforts, and that he has given us a story which, whether for faithful portraiture of Maori scenery, and Maori habits and cus toms, for interest of incident, for skill in con struction, or. for effectiveness of diction, will compare favorably with the works of the best authors. Moreover, as is unfortunately not always the case, it does not contain a line that may not be read aloud in any family. The sentiment is pure, and the characters natural and, vigorously portrayed. The author's familiar features appear in an ad mirable portrait, by Mr. H. J. Woodhouse, which gentleman has also illustrated the book by five full-page illustrations. "Hine Ra" is a marvel of cheap...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In the Engine House. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

In the Engine House. Yes squire, thai yonder's my mate lyin' there, With the mud on his face, an' th' blood in his hair. He don't look pleasant like now, may be, But Bill was es han'some a man es you'd see. I could sit down by him an' cry like a kid Look a here, stranger, dye know what he did, Away below there in number four level, . Where the ground looks'firm, but's as false es th' devil? Big Dick an' Sid White were caught in a fall 'Bout ton or so from the roof, that was all. Their mates wouldn't rescue, p'r'aps they were wise; The twelve inch caps reg'lar snapped 'fore their eyes. A good many of 'em were game enough, mind, But ev'ry man had wife and young' uns to find. 'Twas our four o'clock shift, !I was. off in the town, But in less 'n four they say, Bill was down. He went by 'em all straight up the T drive, An' they heard him call back-" Here they are, both alive !' Then his pick an' his shovel was going like steam; For more 'n a minute Bill worked like a team. Then he came s...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Agricultural, &c. BRIEF NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

BRIEF NOTES. As soon as the ears have been taken from the sweet corn, the stalks should be cut :up and fed to cattle in as green condition as possible. Instead of crying "hard times " every one should study economy, and the farmer should endeavor to raise as near as possible every thiig consumed on the place by man or beast, and by so doing lessen .the amount of cash that has to be paid out. It is not an uncommon error to suppose. that animals that eat but little a'e the most ,profitable., So long as an animal is capable of digesting and assimulating it, the greater the: amount of food it consumes the more profitable are the returns ; for the proportion of the food that goes to supply the waste of. tissue and run the animal machinery is less when a large than when a small amount is eaten, Much of the manner of feeding animals may be known to the butcher by examining their insides after killing. Those which have most fat on the intestines have been fattened after a protracted period"...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Infant Prodigies. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

Infant. Prodigies. The hearts of many parents have been sad dened by having their children obstinately .refuse to "show off" their mental attain ments in the presence of visitors. It is always a parental delusion that this display of Johnny's or Sally's accomplishments can not be but a source of infinite joy to all be holders,: whereas the victimised visitor is simply enduring in enforced silence the tor ture inflicted upon him. Jenkins, a friend of mine, has a son three years old, supposed by the Jenkins to be an infant prodigy, a future Premier, and all that. The friends of the Jenkins family have different sentiments, which I will not here expose because of my regard for Jenkins. I called at Jenkins' house the other evening,. when the pheno menon of the family was fairly oyerflowing with smartness. He came into the room with a whoop and a yell combined with: a hop-step-and-jump movement that• plunged him headlong into my lap, where he lay burrowing his head into my stomach and sc...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
For a Sign. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

For a Sign. A flashily-dressed young man was stand ing just inside the front door of a Yankee carriage on the train to St. Kilda, pretend ing to look out of the window at the scenery. Occasionally he walked to the rear end of the qar. He did a great deal of at titudinising, apparently for the benefit of the ladies. He seemed to think his shape perfection, and enough to travel on in any case the train stopped. His manly form was so conspicuous that pretty soon a pas senger went to him and said : " Sir, you excite my admiration. I am an artist-a sculptor-and I should like your services as a model." " Aw, thanks, sir. ' Are you making an Apollo ?" returned the young man, with a look of triumph toward the lady passengers. " Oh, no," said the artist, " wooden dum mies for ready-made clothing shops."

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Mean Man. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

A Mean Man. Old Billy W. was. one of the richest men who ever lived in Australia, and one of the meanest men who ever drew breath. One day he got:intoq .,a tram.car,, carrying in his hand a'large basket of superb white grapes. Old Billy W. sat in one corner of the car, and a poor mother with a sickly child in her lap sat in the corner opposite. The child looked at the grapes wistfully, as the car rolled on street after street. At last the old man, in a tone of raping curiosity, asked the child where she was going. " To town, sir, to see Auntie." " Do you like grapes ?" ." Yes, sir," and the pale little face bright ened np as the child half rose from her mother's lap. The old man lifted up his basket of lusci ous fruit, and, plucking. one grape from' a gigantic bunch, gave it to the child. The rest of the passengers said nothing, but the way they looked at the old man would have split a stone post.

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Flattering Prospects. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

Flattering Prospects. A farmer once called atthe office of a con temporary. "'How are crops looking out in your neighborhood ?" asked the editor. " Poor, very poor." " What's the matter with the wheat?'" "Oh, first it was dry weather and then it was too wet, and the other day a hailstorm hit it. I don't count on more'n a quarter of a crop." "Well, that is bad--I am very sorry to hear it." The farmer went out and the editor grasped a pencil and wrote: "We received a pleasant call from farmer Snoozenberry on Wednesday afternoon, who dropped in to renew his subscription. Mr. S. brought very flattering reports of the crops and was. particularly enthusiastic about the wheat, which he says is actually booming. He remarked that he would not be afraid to guarantee every man in his district at least thirty bushels to the acre. We would challenge any other section of the colony to make as good a showing as this. He was very earnest in what he said on the subject and communicated his enthu sia...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Memoranda on the Months. MATRIMONIAL, MERCENARY, AND OTHERWISE. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

Memoranda on the Months. MATRIMONIAL, MERCENARY, AND OTHERWISE. January is a good month for young people to get married in. Any day will do-say the first. I don't think a young man can do better than get married in January, unless -which is better still, perhaps-he remains single. February is a good marrying month. Many girls like to be married on their birth day. Girls born on the 29th, however, don't care so much for this if they happen to have picked up their young man on the 2nd of March in leap-year. March.-Hares are mad this month-and heirs, if anything, harder to catch. How ever, try I , April.-This is a warm month. There is not much probability of a girl getting chaps in April. May.-" Let us a-Maying go." See all you can-but, if possible, take mamma with you. Girls who have never had mothers it doesn't matter about. June is generally damp, with occasionally a south wind. Girls like to marry this inonth, or anything else of the masculine gender. July.--If you have not landed ...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Madman's Story. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

The Madman's Story. I-was not always thus, a madman con fined within this. massive and iron-barred prison, with no company but that of other madmen and my own sad thoughts. But stay; Iam wrong, for I have other company ; would you know what it is ? Come close ; let me whisper in your ear. It is hope. Hope of freedom. Freedom, ha ha I freedom I And when once I have, gained it, he shall die. No power on earth can save him from my just vengence. My stroke shall be swift as the lurid lightning and certain as death. Once-how long ago it seems-I had health and happiness, and all that makes life worth living-including fried steak and onions for breakfast-and, more than all, I had a strong, clear, brain. I was a poet, and he, the destroyed of all my peace 'and joy he was an editor. I was the only child of my father, and he *a widower. For many "moons" we lived alone together in peace and quietness on our lordly estate near the great 'city of Mel. bourne, and raised garden stuff for the Vic ...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
For the Ladies [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

It is now much the custom in London, after a large wedding, for the guests to make up par ties to go to clubs where ladies are admitted, or .'ome .ell-knowrxesta3Lrn.an. d afteward_ 'finish the evening at some place of amusement. The Queen has presented Signor Tosti with i beautiful miniature-piano in silver, which opens with a spring and shows numerous re ceptacles for cigars and cigarettes. It is probable that grey of a very delicate shade will be much worn this season, as it was most popular at the last drawing-room. In a recent issue we remarked upon the beauty of a costume of this hue embroidered in steel, that was worn at a recent marriage. The tint can scarcely fail of pleasing those who see it. The newest style for a wedding-dress is to have it of a soft cloth made specially for such occasions, and which is said to be most becom ing to the wearer. Star-shaped bouquets are now coming into voguein London ; some of those at a large wed ding which took place lately having the ce...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Horrid Bores. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

Horrid Bores. You meet him on the pavement, You meet him on the cars, You meet him in the daytime, And you meet him 'neath the stars. He's seen within the hotel, And he's even seen at church; And on the stools of offices You'll often see him perch. Who is this man ubiquitous That follows us around? 'Tis the man that chews the toothpick; Let us put him under ground. And after him we'll send the chap Who k'nows not social life, Who trims his nails in public With a handy pocket-knife.

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How I Bought My Piano. [Newspaper Article] — Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser — 23 April 1887

How I Bought IMy Piano. My name is Jiggers. It is not my fault that my name is Jiggers. I never awoke to the fact that itwas a curious name until-but I anticipate. I have no ear for music-it is a failing in my family-but I have a suffici ent knowledge of time and tune to be per. fectly aware that a screech Mrs. Jiggers indulges in at certain fixed intervals is not ,the "Last Rose of 'Summer," although the words she howls forth are piecisely- those written by one Thomas Moore,'an Irishman. But Mrs. Jiggers has, in spite of our lack of harmony, 1in more senses than one, insisted that the home is not complete without a piano. In the far away time, ere the evil days came out, my grandfather's harpsichord was strummed on by the junior branches of our family, till a rough and bloated man (which history recorded not his name, but he was that fiend in human shape known as a broker) interfered with their innocent joys, and from that day until now, with the exception of a few malignant tin wh...

Publication Title: Queenscliff Sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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