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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

"r " ,.,,, The Indian Advocate." 288 attempt is now made to decorate the every-day dwelling; it would be batsic, tabooed (or sacrilegious). The traditions preserve methods of house building that were imparted to mortals by the gods themselves. These methods, as is usual in such cases, are the simplest and of the most primitive na ture, but they are still scrupulously followed. Early mention of house building occurs in the creation myths: First-man and First-woman are discovered in the first or lowest underworld, living in a hut which was the pro totype of the hogan. There were curious beings located at the cardinal points in that first world, and these also lived in huts of the same style, but constructed of different materials. In the east was Tieholtsodi, who afterward appears as a water monster, but who then lived in the House of Clouds, and Icni (Thunder).'guarded his doorway. In the south was Teal (Frog) in a house of blue fog, and Tielin, who is afterward'a water monster, lay ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

289 The Indian Advocate. traditions hold that the houses were made entirely of the. sub stances mentioned and that no wood was used in their con struction, because at that time no wood or other vegetal ma terial had been produced. After mankind had ascended through the three under worlds by means of the magic reed to the present or fourth world, Qastceyalci, the God of Dawn, the benevolent nature god of the south and east, imparted to each group of man kind an appropriate architecture to the tribes of the plains, skin lodges; to the Pueblos, stone houses; and to the Navaho, huts of wood and earth and summer shelters. Curiously enough, nowhere in Navaho tradition is any mention or sug gestion made of the use by them of skin lodges. In building the Navaho hogan Qastceyalci was assisted by Qastceqogan, the God of Sunset, the complementary nature god of the north and west, who is not so uniformly benignant as the former. In the ceremonies which follow the erection of a hogan today the s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. 290 ter and 10 to 12 feet long are selected. Three of the five timbers must terminate in spreading forks, but this is not nec essary for the other two, which are intended for the doorway and are selected for their straightness. When suitable trees have been found, and sometimes they are a considerable distance from the site selected, they are cut down and trimmed, stripped of bark, and roughly dressed. They are then carried or dragged to the site of the hogan and there laid on the ground with their forked ends together, extreme care being taken to have the butt of one log point to the south, one to the west, and one to the north. The two straight timbers are then laid down with the small ends close to the forks of the north and south timbers and with their butt ends pointing to the east. They must be spread apart about the width of the doorway which they will form. When all the timbers have been laid out on the ground, the position of each one of the five butts ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

2gi The Indian Advocate. and each is handled by a number of men, usually four or five, who set the butt ends firmly in the ground on opposite sides at the points previously marked and lower the timbers to a slanting position until the forks lock together. While some of the men hold these timbers in place, others set the west timber on the western side of the circle, placing it in such a position and in such a manner that its fork, receives the other -two, and the whole structure is bound together at the top. The forked apex of the frame is 6 to 8 feet above the ground, in ordinary hogans, but on the high plateaus and. among the pine forests in the mountain districts hogans of this type, but intended for ceremonial purposes, are sometimes constructed with an interior height of 10 or n feet, and inclose an area 25 to 30 feet in diameter. In -the large- hogans mentioned a crowd of workers are engaged in the construction, and ropes and other mechanical aids are employed to lift the heav...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

? The Indian Advocate. 292 While the sides are being inclosed by some of the work ers a door-frame is constructed by others. This consists sim ply of two straight poles with forked tops driven into the ground at the base of and close inside of the doorway timbers. When in place these poles are about 4 feet high, set upright, with a straight stick resting in the forks. Another short stick is placed horizontally across the doorway timbers at a point about 3 feet below the apex, at the level of and parallel with the -cross-stick of the door-frame. The space between this cross-stick and the apex is left open to form an exit for the smoke. Sometimes when the hogan is unbearably smoky a rough chimney-like structure, consisting of a rude cribwork, is placed about this smoke hole. The doorway always has a flat roof formed of straight " limbs or split poles laid closely together, with one end resting I on the crosspiece which forms the base of the smoke hole and the other end on the crosspie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

293 The Indian Advocate. thrown on from base to apex to a thickness of about six inches, but enough is put on to make the hut perfectly wind and water proof. This operation finishes the house, and usually there are enough volunteers to complete the work in a day. It is customary to make a kind of recess on the western side of the hut by setting out the base of the poles next to the west timber some 8 to 15 inches beyond the line. This ar rangement is usually placed next to and on the south side' of the west timber, and all the poles for a distance of 3 or 4 feet are set out. The offset thus formed is called the; "mask re cess," and when a religious ceremony is performed in the hogan, the shaman or medicine man hangs a skin or cloth before it and deposits there his masks and fetiches. This re cess, of greater or less dimensions, is made in every large hogan, but in many of the smaller ones it is omitted. In the construction of a hogan all the proceedings are conducted on a definite, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

' TV.r" -"- XTr "J'W- . " - .The Indian Advocate. 294 i came itm ui 1 inr it Myths and Traditions of the Primi- SOME INDIAN LORE.; ,, Uua u t 1 :t tive Children of the Territory. -- The Indian Territory is rich in myths and traditions. Many of the Indians are simple and still so primitive that su perstition and signs are their rules of conduct. No one in the Territory is more familiar with Indian lore than Charles Gib son. Mr. Gibson related recently how, according to their be lief, the Took-a-par-chees came into possession of the famous 41 jewels" which are so conspicuous in the Green Corn dance. The story, as Mr. Gibson learned it, runs thus: 'Years and years ago the one that looks over the Musko gees appeared to the medicine man and spoke to him, saying: 'Your celebrations are incomplete; you need jewelry with your celebrations.' He told him that on a certain day and on a certain mountain peak he would meet the great medicine man and receive from him certain jewels, which would b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

295 The Indian Advocate. man's hands above his head. He reached up for the basket and it dropped gently into his hands. Just at that moment the mist cleared away and the sun was shining brightly over the mountains and valleys. The medicine man said to him self, 'Took-us-chee,' and rambled off down the mountain. He raised the top of the basket to take a peep, but the jewels were so bright that no man could behold them in the sun shine. He took them to the Ehokothlacco, or square house, in great triumph and placed them in the sacred vault, which place but few are allowed to enter. The Wind clan of the Took-a-par-chees, being the strongest clan, were made custo dians of the sacred jewels, which sacred office they have held to this day. These jewels are used at their annual Green Corn dances or celebrations once a year. Not only the Took-a-par-chees, but all Creek Indians look upon these relics as being very sacred, having been handed down to the medicine man of the Muskogees from the c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. - 296 , M , ; -' near where the Creeks used to have their council ground, jv;( , now known as Council Ground Hill, sojne twenty-five miles V northwest of Checotah. He killed a large buck and) had ; skinned it and packed it on his pony and was walking and leading his pony. It was winter and snow was on the ground. Just north of the Council Ground Hill he became fagged and , thirsty and went a few steps out of his way to a spring that oozed out of the hillside in times past. He tied his pony to a rock and began to refresh himself with the water, but it did f not taste very well. He noticed also that there was a little fog evaporating out of the spring. He wondered why the fog should come from the spring, as it was not a very cold day and the water was cold. He sat around the spring and won- dered at the thing some time. At last he took a notion to have a smoke of sumach and tobacco mixed. In those days ,, the Indians had no parlor matches, but used a flintrock and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

297 The Indian Advocate. v the blaze a few seconds and said: 'Good. I have sure enough set the world on fire. I must put the fire out, if possible.' He dismounted and unsaddled his pony and took his blanket and dropped it in a hole of water. He rushed up to the little spring and undertook to quench the blaze with his wet saddle blanket, but that seemed to have no effect. Then he spread ,the wet blanket all over the spring and smothered out the flames. He then undertook to take his quilt and saddle blanket out of the spring, but that would not work. It dis solved and settled downnn a black mass at the bottom of the little spring. The Indian felt defeated in the melee, but was proud to go home, feeling and believing that he could burn the world up when necessary. He gatherd up his venison and was home with his squaw soon afterward, and from that day on he taught the other Indians that he was able to set the world on fire at will, but he took great care never to light his pipe around t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. 298 .-.. ....w-.-ww..-w 1 11 INDIAN MISSIONS, lj & I 1 it j The following picturesque story comes to us without the author's signature, a fact to be regretted. We reproduce it for the reason that, apart from its literary excellence, it tells a typical story of the devotion, zeal and perseverance of the daughters of St. Ursula: During the burning heat of a recent week I fled away from the world's busy bustle. Taking the westward train in the early morning, I was swept past towers and steeples, grove and meadow, lying asleep in the moonlight. City after city, crowned by flashing lights, passed me; the sirocco-like air fanned me with a less scorching breath, and the awaking pulse of returning morn contended with my yesterday's feel ings that it was too hot to breathe. The third day of my "hegira" the low-laughing thunder echoing along the Black Hills of Dakota gave, with a generous freedom, the spirit raising breath of the north. Awaking next morning .an air ch...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

299 The Indian Advocate. expand, my life to broaden and my heart to be filled with a new life and joy. At Great Falls a party boarded the train, an interesting party, too, it was; and soon I found myself engaged in con versation with one of the gentlemen, a doctor by profession, going, as he told me, to St. Peter's Mission to be present at the closing exercises of the school and the religious reception of some young ladies; and immediately I jumped at the con clusion that these latter were friends of his, a false conclusion, as I afterwards learned. Being bound nowhere in particular, and extremely anxious to pass some days amid the elevating scenes and invigorating air of the mountains, I managed through a mutual acquaintance of the doctor and myself to get an invitation to accompany him to the Grand Indian Mission of which he spoke so eloquently. Most romantically situated is St. Peter's, the novitiate and mother house of the Ursuline nuns in the Rocky Mountains. It was evening ere...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. 300 1 ' soul of the savage. Next morning the unclouded ether bent over us in broad expanse, drinking in the tones of love and praise and pleading, which floated from the open casements of the chapel ere the day was one hour old. Inside the con vent was a-blossom with ferns and flowers, while an arch of the stern mountain growth before an oratory was hung an ex quisitely painted Sacred Heart, which seemed to attune the soul to the spirit of sacrifice with the inner life of those so generously devoting life and talents to the education of the Indian. The morning passed like a sweet dream, and in the afternoon we were invited to the study hall, transformed for the time being into an auditorium. There I was pleased to see representatives from other religious orders, Sisters of , Charity and a nun from the Order of the Visitation. After the address of welcome came "Coaina," dramatized; it was most perfectly performed by some 100 Indian girls. The scenery, together wi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

30i The Indian Advocate. fc months from their tepees, all received a praise which found echo in the mind 6f each auditor. After the entertainmeut I was honored by the Venerable Superioress with a few moments' interview, the motive power of all this work so sublime in its object, marvelous in its effects and so divine in its beauty of results and harmony of execution. From this Apostolic Ursuline, whose sanctity is truly magnetic, I learned to think of the Indian, not in the gross, nor in the abstract, but as an individual whose life goes with ours to make up the word "humanity." I heard, too, from my gentle hostess, that the little Indian girl's heart is often a most delicate instrument, attuned to that unison of melodious sanctity ascending daily from the lips of earth to the ear of heaven. And as I listened, charmed by the beauty of the thought and the sweetness of expression, I found my self thinking it must be a most unattunable soul indeed which could remain un-Christianized, u...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

The Indian Advocate. 302 the gate of traffic and profit. Had we a few Mother Kathe rines,God's work need riot languish, nor -this unfinished con vent laugh at our circumscribed finances." Again I found myself thinking, and this time I was selling my Spanish castles to case those windows and doors, to floor those planked halls and rooms and thus shut out the wild wind of a northern winter. Oh, had I but the means the will would not be lacking. The evening was spent among the hills and canyons of the mission, those same blessed hills where Father de Smet had planted the cross of salvation and broke the bread of life to the Blackfeet and FJatheads. The exhilarating morning breeze and the exquisite fragrance of the blossoming clover awoke me next morning, just as delicate touches of gold and roseate purple were fading before the vast ocean of light that attends a June day in the mountains. I felt almost sorry that I was awake when the thought came to me that this was my last day, for a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

PL ?, ,r.Tg$3&;.v?7Zr,$$,t..m, .STrTTirS!! 303 The Indian Advocate. i f I :: M THE INDIAN ADVOCATE SACKED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA ?- A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Maty, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St Michael and St. Benedict. , Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo Mcerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Tcrritor" ' ' TBRJffl OF SOUSCRIPTIONl v ' ,t, Single Copies , . 15c. Annual . ! $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c Foreign ; , $1.25. - - I'ubushed by the Mencdiuine ratners 01 , - 'tyt -5 f. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma " " v. l'niVILKGKSi " ' "Ti i. , Every Subscriber nnd Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good J, works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 1$? 2. A solemn High Mass is sung eery First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred &jf ...Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. - 3. A Conventual Mass is offered c cry First Saturday of the month...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

h The Indian Advocate. 304 For the third time within the present generation has the Chief Magistrate of this Republic been stricken down by the hand of an assassin. The story of this national tragedy has been fully related in the daily press, and we therefore refrain from going into details; but the Advocate, in common with all other civilized journals, wishes to express its sorrow for, and abhorrence aud detestation of, this dastardly crime, and it is our hope that the Federal and civil authorities throughout the nation will take such steps as will purge this land, not only of the active conspirators, but of every follower and sympathizer of the red flag of anarchy-. We do not see wherein the reconcentrado policy which the British are enforcing in South Africa differs in any essential particular from that which, when practiced by the Spaniards in Cuba, excited the horror of the civilized world. The plain truth is that a people who claim to be civilized are engaged in the ruthless s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

35 Thk Indian Advocate. ago, when they armed the ruthless savage to harry the border settlements of America, and have turned loose upon the Boers the hordes of the aboriginal races. The dealings of the British in South' Africa are comparable only with those of the savages who destroyed the Roman empire, or with their own acts toward another African people who were defending their own homes in the Soudan. Their motive is the lust of power and plunder and nothing else, and their acts are a dis grace to the civilization of the century. ' ' All civilized nations look upon an early and virtuous education of children as an object of the first magnitude, and as one of the most effectual means to stop the progress of impiety, to promote the honor and glory of God, to advance the happiness of every country, to preserve peace and order in society, and to prevent the ruin and destruction of number less souls. It is for this reason that no establishments are deemed more. necessary, more useful,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

09$ L Tun Indian Adnocati:. 306 readily drawn to good or evil, to virtue or to vice; like unto a young, tender plant, which is so flexible that it may be easily bent on every side; but as a plant, when it has once sprung up into a tree, is no longer pliable, but will sooner break than bend after some years' growth. So in like manner, when the growth of children's passion is not checked and prevented by seasonable remedies; when they are not formed' and modeled to virtue in due time; when vice is once suffered to take deep root in their hearts, they become generally inflexible and in corrigible, and continue to advance in their evil ways as they advance in age; or if they ever happen to reform their lives, it is not without great difficulty, and the powerful aid of an extraordinary grace from God, which they have no right to expect, after having devoted the first fruits and the bloom of their lives to the drudgery of sin and to the service of Satan. It is, therefore, a matter of the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

. - M M 307 The Indian Advocate. hope of benefiting their financial condition, while still others move to give their children a wider scope for development, or to find a home in Uncle Sam's free domain. Be the object what it may, it is a wise and prudent person who, in this case, "makes haste slowly" "Life is a burden bear it; Life is a duty dare it; Life is a thorn crown wear it." When the Church in her infancy was opposed by the in credulity and obstinacy of the Jews, she gloriously triumphed by the zeal and miracles of her Apostles; when she was at tacked by the infidelity of the Gentiles, she became victorious by the courage and constancy of her martyrs; when the here siarchs and sectaries attempted to corrupt and adulterate the purity of her faith, she refuted their erroneous tenets by the wisdom and erudition of her doctors and by the decisions of her general councils; but she had not been happy enough to subdue the vicious and disorderly conduct of numbers of her own refracto...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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