ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
5,371 results
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

What Copper Investment Means We call the attention of our readers to the advertisement of the Seattle- Boston Copper Company, appearing for the first time in this issue. The men at the head of this company are well known in our city, Charles E. Crane having been for years the mana ger and principal owner of the Dia mond Ice & Storage Company and the Mutual Light and Heat Company. Dr. Churchill is a physician of seventeen years' practice in Seattle and a very successful business man. F. A. Sut phen and M. B. Crane are of the well known firm of M. B. Crane & Co., Inc. With these gentlemen is associated A. M. Brooks, manager of the Pacific Coast Biscuit Company. None of these gentlemen would allow their names to be connected with any proposition which was not guilt-edge and would bear every investigation. They have incorporated this company for the pur pose of developing copper properties in King and adjoining counties, which are deserving of their assistance, and they propose ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

12 THE FIELD Where Drainage Made Big Change. (H. L Blanchard.) Thf writer'! mange] wmtseli ex hibited ity bin at the Jefferson county fair last week won first prize in a hot competition. Mr. Leekenby, in charge of the seed department for the Chas. H. hilly Co., Seattle, being the judge. The roots exhibited were selected 'from our two-acre mangel patch. We thought wo would give a little history of these two acres for the lesson it teaches. \W always considered the two acres in question to be the equal of any, if not the best two acres on the farm, our judgment being based upon their lo cation and the general character of the soil. As a matter of fact we had seldom harvested from this land more than a half crop. We had planted on it every farm crop that we grow. Po tatoes always blighted; mangels the same— two to five pounds being the largest roots grown; clover would die out; timothy would give way to the natural grass, while oats would do fairly well—the best of anything. In view of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

THE POWER OF FAIRS FOR GOOD. (H. L. Hlanchard.) The MMOn of fairs is now on and the opportunity is thus prwnfd t<> the fanner and his family to take a tV.v days' needed rest, in social inter course with brother fanners. The well conducted fair supplies object lessons galor« that carry with them much pleasure and great profit. Nothing can be of greater interest or value to the progressive farmer than is the study of a display of the cream of the farm products of his county or state. Comparatively few farmers are com pensated for their efforts beyond the average yield per acre from the crops they cultivate. Many more must con tent themselves with the minimum yield. Hence it comes, that farming as an occupation presents such varied and wide results among different farm ers. The fair is an object school where are systematically arranged for inspection and study the actual evidences and results of superior til lage and cultivation of the various farm crops, as also the breeding and...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

14 LIVE STOCK The Livestock Show at Portland. Since the 19th of September there has been in progress at the Lewis and Clark exposition at Portland the great est livestock show ever held in the great northwest, and it is not likely that we will very soon see another like it in this section. Thirteen states were represented: Oregon, Washing ton, California, Montana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Indiana, lowa, Illinois, Wyoming and British Columbia. Large numbers of animals were entered in each class, every one of them representing the highest type of their particular breed. Among the exhibitors from the northwestern states we note the following: Hol stein-Friesians —P. A. Frakes, Scap poose, Ore., Pierce Land & Live Stock Co., Stockton, Cal., and Hazelwood Co., Spokane, while J. B. Irwin, of Minnesota, was there with eleven head; Shorthorns—H. W. Peel (Birch Hill Stock Farm), Spokane, C. E. Ladd, (Oak Hill Farm), Portland, W. O. Minor, Heppner, Ore., Hazelwood Co., Spokane...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

prove to oe as favorable as the stock man had hoped, his losses at seventy be confidently expected, both of the land and its products during the same series of years. This is about the sum and substance of the difference be tween tweedlededee and tweedlede dum in the cattle business on the great ranges of the shortgrass country. The successful sheepman of today must be a practical Business man and a sheepman, too, and if he is not a sheepman he will have to go into the business in a conservative way until he understands it. Before buying any sheep it is necessary to select a range, SPECIAL WANT COLUMN Two Cents a Word Each Insertion. FOR SALE —Jersey bull, three years old. F. W. Keller, Orillla, King Co., Wash. CHESTER WHITE~Pigs~ from regis tered mature stock for sale. Address Chas. A. Hagen, Sprague, Wash. FOR SALE —Two thoroughbred female Scotch Collie pups, 3 months old, $5.00 each. George Maggs, 1500 Dexter Aye., Seattle. FOR SALE —Pure bred registered Hol steln bull, 4 years o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

16 B^BHHBHHHHI RSI I I S THE guiding star V^jjlvfl ■ ' that steers the I^^^lQ Bm||KV Dairy Interest in the .^ij^T^^^^^Mi^J[J^^PJ^MH^^BH^^^H^^^B^^^^^^^^^^^B|Lj^^^N^^B right direction to prop |H^p __ BH|HI er and correct methods mmJ ■■II m —■- . — in airy . Practice, and _^@9^ IIP OPlnnill imiMUIHIII public opinion has de t==^W rut VkA II HI irHT 111 ■111 cicled that the Sharpies Will ■ IIP -I ■HH ■■IILIUl y 1 mmmMmfM Tubular Separator is ■IT m 11! U fci*" mm m HIBBfBBi HP MM the correct separator Ml jk 9 mm P^ HIBBBBBIB from every possible jbS&'^ y ™ ** _^^^^^otf^^^t^ Bill I H5^S55^H point of view- I >sT X M illrtl*ll^^Hril 111 I Bilk HH^^HI^H CORRECT because HB mB3 I I I^J I k | 111 m Ihl^^^^^^Bl tlie crank turns twenty MBjaflljfflHßßffilTßjJ 11 aI 11 lj| I9J*™ lAB L Jl Wmm P er cent easier than the ppijljjpp^^ crank of any other sep lß^BwwHliEßßK||aßEHJHPßpi|H^ arator made. nWßKl^B^&^^^^^a*^* aimn^^mmm^^^m^^^^m^^^^^^^^m^^^^^ CORRECT because the bowl is so simple that it ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

•»ti .— m • ••!*•* ■ • "*• "* * . VOL. XXIT. NO. 20. * A PAGE ON FERTILITY AND FERTILIZERS * Fertilizers and Moisture. Nature stores in the seeds of all plants food suitable to their growth during the early stages of germination, and when first pushing their way from the seeds the shootlets are tender and easily destroyed. If the rains are plen tiful, and the soil loose and fine, any substance that may be injurious will be diluted and distributed; but should the season be dry the best results with fertilizers, when applied in the hills, in proximity to the young plants during the beginning of their exist ence, may not be obtained. Fertilizers are partly valuable according to their solubility in water, the more easily soluble the better, and hence there is no necessity for applying such in the hill at any time, as the finer the in gredients and their exposure to air and moisture the more quickly they perform service, although experiments in sections have shown that even when fertiliz...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

2 that element but soils which analyze low in potash should have that len ticular Otomeni applied, for it is es sential to the production of good fruit. A prominent fruit grower on Puget Sound whose soil analyzes rather low in potash, was asked recently if he had tried applying that element on patches which had been in strawberries for some time. "Yes," he replied, "1 bought some commercial fertilizer last spring, which seemed to make larger vines, but I can't say the yield was better." The fact is the "commercial fertilizer" which he bought might have been rich in nitrogen, which he did not need, and low in potash, the part required. Blood and bone may constitute a commercial fertilizer, but that is not likely to do much good for Puget Sound strawberry growers, for these soils need the p^ash whether ob tained from liquid manures, ashes or from the Strassfurt mines. On the NOW IS THE TIME I , To buy a ranch in Western Washington. For a few dollars down you can H^\ n&*BmßPrrmrHAM...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Building, Seattle. M11.1.E8. FREEMAN, Editor and Proprietor Associate editors F WALDEN, H. EBS BNCHAR R MRS. S. G. WEBSTER. fitted the first and fifteenth of Month ' Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cenS six months 301 cents. If on time, icHbers PL Ore required to pay $1.00 per year on account of local postage so- AsenTs wanted in every town to so ' licit subscriptions. Good commissions "nd salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper Stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list shown on your paper by address label COSffnnS to Or Ue rce I|ve ne the paper regular ly you should notify the Seattle office at' once, when mistakes, if any, will be C°The teßanch is entered at the Seattle postofnee at second-class rates of post age. _; - ' . ■■---- Addres* c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES it may mm to some of our reader! that the vital Question relative to reg ulating railroad rates lias nothing to do with horticulture. Hut it has. 1 have often said in this department that when a man has raised a good crop of fruit his work is but half done. He must get it to market in good ■hape. The railroads and other means of transportation are essential to his success. If, however, the charges for transportation eat up all the profits his business must be a failure. In BOrae instances this has actually oc curred. If the transportation compa nies make an enormous profit when the grower makes little or nothing, then it must be evident to every per son who loves justice that a great wrong has been done. If the trans portation companies will not do the right thing in such cases, then they should be made to do so. Our presi dent is advocating and pushing with all his energy a measure to have such matters under the control of the in ter-state commerce commission,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

eties. In one locality they are fall apples, in another winter. The Wealthy, the Gravenstein, the Snow and the Macintosh are fall apples in the Yakima valley, but in some parts even in Washington they are winter apples. The Duchess, which we class as a summer apple in some high alti tudes, will keep well into the winter. So in making out a list of fall apples the fact just mentioned must be kept in view. The list of fall apples is so large that not nearly all can even be mentioned. One of the best of this class of ap ples is the Maiden's Blush. It is a fine looking apple and the quality is good, especially for eating. It soon gets mellow after the first of Septem ber, but will keep till the middle of October, thus making it a good stand apple. It is not sour enough to make it a first class cooking apple. Still it is passable in this respect. The Gloria Mundi, Wolf River, Spokane Beauty, and Twenty Ounce Pippin are all fall apples in the warmer sections, but no one is advised to plan...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

0 HOUSEHOLD MBS. S. P. WEBSTER Send communications for this depart ment to Mrs. S. Q. Webster, 259 Colman block, Seattle, or direct to The Ranch. All questions will be carefully answered. Contributions for publication welcome. Clearing the Garden for Winter. Begin by removing dead stalks and stems from all the annual plants and burn them at once, as they contain many insect eggs—and in this way much harm is averted. If fall pruning is done, hardy perpetual roses should be cut back one-half of the season's growth, so new wood may form in the spring, upon which they bloom. Thus in the fall one-fourth of the pruning is done and what remains is done in the spring. Do not tie up rose bushes in straw or gunny sacks. It is better to turn a half-keg or barrel over them, anchoring with a heavy stone on top. House plants which have been in pots in the garden during the summer should now be taken up and if roots have appeared on the outside of the pot a larger one should be given— but only one...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

comes clear. Renew the cloth, wash the cover, put the weights back, and let stand for a month, at the end of which time the sauerkraut will be ready for use. Care must be taken that the least air possible should enter the sauerkraut, and also that the cover be perfectly clean. Each time the crock has to be opened it must be properly closed again. These precau tions should not be neglected. This is the recipe for the famous Strasburg as well as the Alsace sauer kraut. Another Recipe for Cveese Pie. C rus t —One pint of flour, one tea spoonful of baking powder, salt and a little sugar. Add enough flour to make the dough as stiff as for soda biscuit, and smooth out in deep pie tins. On top of this spread the cheese mixture, made of well-drained cottage cheese rubbed smooth with two raw eggs and plenty of sugar. Add cur rants or raisins, spread about an inch in thickness, and bake until the crust is done. —Mrs. J. H. Answers to Correspondents. Sarah B.: Yes, there is a very pretty new w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

8 THE DAIRY The Initial Contamination of Milk. (Dr. S. B. Nelson.) The saving of a baby life is without doubt of greater value to the world than the saving of an adult life, for the reason that under normal condi tions the usefulness to the world and the earning capacity is greater in the normal life of the first one than in the latter one, the latter having al ready lived up a part of his usefulness to the world. It has often been stated on pretty good authority that a great percentage of infant mortality is due to digestive disturbances. If this is true, and without question it is, then two things become of vast importance —the food given to infants and the conditions governing the giving of the food. The latter phase, the conditions governing the feeding of infants and young children, I shall not discuss. I however, wish to give consideration to the first one, the food given to in fants and children, and indeed, a spe cial food, milk. At some distant time in the past the food rec...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

test and locates it nine times out of ten but that is no reason why care lessness should be practiced all the time in milking. The consumer of milk in the city gets hold of some of this tainted and impure milk, and he blames the dairy from which it came. The city man does not care one lota whether the milk came from John, Jacob, or Isaac, so long as it is good and rich. But, what is "good" and "rich" milk? There is going to be a different definition as to what is "good" for the human family, and what is not good, according to some mod ern medical authorities. Cows in Holland. In referring to the manner of caring for cows in Holland, Prof. Conor says they are turned out to pasture in May, and do not return to the stable until November. During the cold, damp days of early spring they wear blan kets in the pasture to protect them from the weather. At milking time they are not driven to the barn to be milked, as is the custom in this coun try, but instead the milkmaids go to the cows, w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

10 POULTRY ■ H. L. BLANCHARD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences de tailed and questions prove of great ben efit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Had lock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Se attle. The Moulting Hen. (H. L. Blanchard.) The present is the most trying sea son of the year for the poultryman. Eggs are worth 35 and 40 cents per dozen, and but very few who keep hens have any to sell. The old hens are passing through the moult, appar ently the most trying period in their life, while the pullets have not yet commenced laying in earnest. Under these conditions we are too apt to ne glect the fowls, particularly the hens. This, however, should not occur. The hens are the most to be desired for breeding purposes next spring. By proper care they can be got to laying again by the month of December or early in January, in time to get to gether the early setting's. We find it desirable to hatch out the Rocks and Wyandottes in February and early in March...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

What Copper Investment Means We call the attention of our readers to the advertisement of the Seattle- Boston Copper Company, appearing for the first time in this issue. The men at the head of this company are well known in our city, Charles E. Crane having been for years the mana ger and principal owner of the Dia mond Ice & Storage Company and the Mutual Light and Heat Company. Dr. Churchill is a physician of seventeen years' practice in Seattle and a very successful business man. F. A. Sut phen and M. B. Crane are of the well known firm of M. B. Crane & Co., Inc. With these gentlenlen is associated A. M. Brooks, manager of the Pacific Coast Biscuit Company. None of these gentlemen would allow their names to be connected with any proposition which was not guilt-edge and would bear every investigation. They have incorporated this company for the pur pose of developing copper properties in King and adjoining counties, which are deserving of their assistance, and they propose...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

12 THE, FIELD The Fall Web-Worm Tree Pest. (E. A. Popenoe.) Shade trees on lawn, park and street are subject to attack by dark caterpil lars about an inch and a quarter long, covered with long, white hairs, and spinning, for the protection of the col ony in which they live, a dirty, white, silken web, covering, when fully de veloped, the entire terminal portion of the branch infested. This insect is the fall web-worm, known for many years as a tree pest in lawn and orchard, but more abundant and at tracting more attention than usual last year and this. Observations by the Kansas experi ment station establish the tact that in the southern region the insect is two brooded, and hence more troublesome than in states farther north, where but a single brood is matured in a season. Its life history is in brief as follows: The parent insect is a white moth about an inch in extent of wings. It appears in April and May from pupae which have passed the winter under rubbish and in loose soil at...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

and this filled with clean water. The seeds then settle to the bottom, while the pulp may be poured off the top. Water is again added and poured off, and this repeated until the seeds are thoroughly WMhed and free from all admixture of pulp. Put the seeds in a muslin bag and squeeze out the water, leaving the seeds clean and half dry. Then empty them on a screen or shut ter covered with paper or, better, mus lin, one thickness, and expose to the sun, or place in a warm drying room. After they are thoroughly cured they may be stored in bulk in a dry store room. In this way you will get nice bright seeds. Eggplant, pepper, cu cumber and melon seeds may be han dled in a similar way. The Matter of Soil Inoculation. The subject of soil inoculation has been gaining attention from the farm ers right along and is one in which in tense interest is being manifested by every one who desires to see better farming and better crops. At least this is the case out west, where inoc ulation of the so...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1905

14 LIVE STOCK Ground And Unground Grain. We are frequently asked whether it pays to grind corn for pigs, and our usual answer to the question is: What is a pig's time worth anyhow? Pigs like to crack corn and they have not anything else to do. If it is fed to them unground it gives them some thing to do. More than that, they ta nKe more time to eat. There is better di gestion and consequently a better as similation. The pig does not swallow the corn whole. If ground and made into a thick slop it is gulped down. It is not masticated and therefore not properly digested and assimilated. This is especially true in the fall and early winter. By the end of summer corn, especially the more flinty varie ties, becomes exceedingly hard, and hence it pays to soak the corn and bring it back as near as possible to the condition of corn when it is just ripe. It does not follow, however, that it does not pay to grind wheat, rye, or barley for pigs. Experienced feeders know that when these grains a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x