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Title: Western Age Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 52,784 items from Western Age, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DOWNY MILDEW. On Cabbage and Cauliflower Seedlings. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 24 February 1915

DOWNY MILDEW. On Cabbage and Cauliflower Seedlings, Last season complaints were received that a disease known as 'Downy Mil dew' had done damage among cabbage and cauliflower seedlings, and a few suggestions were made by the oincers of tho Biological Branch that are worth ? repeating at the present time. Ihe conditions that caused this fungus disease n$y not recur, of course, and it may be odvrral seasons before If m-t-i a reappearanco, but the spores (or seeds) of the fungus hive great resist ance to unfavorable conditions, and in any season a spell of moist, humid wea ther may allow it to develop again to spread rapidly. The disease is due to a fungus that produces 'Downy Mildew' or whitish mould on many cruciferous plants, and 'dampingoff' in the seed-beds. The' fungus produces two forms of spores (or seods), viz. (1) large thin-walled spores that can bo borne in the air in great numbers, and (2) thick-walled resting spores. The first spread the divensc at once, quickly infecting...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Lloyd Copper Co. THE FINANCIAL POSITION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 24 February 1915

The Lloyd Copper Co. THE FINANCIAL PO8ITION. Advices reoeived from London diB olose some interesting faots regarding the Lloyd Copper Company, whioh was last week granted one month's exemption ov. thoir Burrnga mine. At a meeting of the company in Lon don it was stated that the sharehold ers' response to the call to subsorih'o £20,000 first mortgage debentures wns very small. Apart from the con tributions of tho directors, it only amounted to £500. To enable the mine to continue operations as long as it did, the board had advanced the company £5000. The financial posi tion at the present time was that they were something under £15,000 in debt. That was their total lia bility, so that, while conditions were most favorable in relation to the war and the prioe of ooppar, it would be necessary to deal with tbe finances of tbe company before they could restart work at tbe mine. The general man ager was of opinion that, provided tbe milling plant was re-organised and the developments unde...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY DON'T YOU GO? [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 24 February 1915

WHY DON'T YOU GOP (By 'Oriel,' in Melbourne 'Argus.') Out in the trenches our bravo boys art /ailing, Fighting in water and sleeping in snow, Feather-bed heroes, your country is call ing! What arc you waiting forf Why don't you go? Mothers are mourning, and sisters arc weeping, Heroes arc dring — their face to the f oc— L'nder the dark -oil our loved ones arc Ij'ing; .More muu :iro minted there — Why don't you go? Men of Australin, the Kmpiro is calling 1 Do not brave deeds yet your bosoms aglow I Throw down your ploughshare, and pick up your rifle, Shoulder your share of it — Why don't you go? Sec the boys nixrihiuK 'neath Liberty's banner.' Mark the proii'l iet of them, row upon row! Have you no pride in the land that has bred you? . What arc you thinking of? Why don't you go I Will you teek safety while others are striving / Will you ignobly look on at the 'show.'' Where i.' your manhood, young man of Australia? CJuick! Get a hustle on— Why don't you go?

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SLUSHY YARD. And How to Improve It. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 24 February 1915

THE SLTJBHT YABD.' And How to Improve It. What to do with the poultry yard thuf is tranSpled into slush in. every spell of wet weather, is a question that presents itself to many poultry-keepers. It was put, before the Poultry Expert by a recent correspondent, and the reply will probably interest a number of. people. ? :? ; ?_???'?'' ??_''. If the yards are level and oaiy get into a slushy condition in wet weather, a coating of ashes or' sand -will be found an improvement,' but1 If 'the' trouble is ?the result- of a low-lying position and of bad drainage nothing will do^nrneh good except to permanently raise 'the 'level. For this purpose neither sand nor ashes airo of much use, for the water will continue' to lie in the holes and. will form ' cesspools that may become ' ?breeding 'ground* /for disease. Soil' must be Used, and it must be used io as to enable it to become' incorporated with the old surface; or it will, simply cake and peel off. The ' old sortaoe should be loosened -an...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VERACITY OF BERLIN NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 24 February 1915

VEEAOITY OF BERLIN NEWS. A conference between the editors of the leading German papers and the rep resentatives of the general staff and the Foreign Oflice takes place at 10 every morning, in tho Roichs.tag build ing. At these gatherings the spokesman of the military authorities gives the journalists instructions as to the tone which thev must adoDt towards the ovents of the war. It often happens that the Foreign Oflice representative feels compelled to enter a protest against these instructions. Thus, on one occasion the Foreign Oflice deputy ex pressed tho wish -that the press should cease the publication of the highly colored descriptions of alleged atrocities committed by the Russians, Belgians and French. 'Our press,' he said, 'overdoes tho horrors. In most coses these stories of tho shooting of harm less persons and murders of women scorn to be found on the ceilings of the Berlin editorial rooms. The foreign press loses faith in the veracity o£ Berlin news. We must not have re...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RAPIDITY OF THOUGHT IN SLEEP. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 24 February 1915

IIAl'IWTY OK- THOUGHT IN 8LKEP. We can dream more in a minute than we can relate in in hour, Dr. Bernard' Hollander stated at a meeting of the Cat ford Natural History Society. It was, lie explained, because of tho great rapid ity of thought in sleep that wo could not ulways recollect our imams. The dreams wo remembered were mostly those which occurred during the periud when we were just awakening, and that was why our Dreams were usually untinisned. iJiucr enecs were observed between one person and another in ri'U'tml to tho amount of sleep required. .Some men never slept more than five hours: others required seven hours, thu overage for vigorous adults; and some slept for nine hours or more. The chief rule laid down by Dr. Hollander for those desirous of sound and refreshing sleep nas to practice go ing to bed at a definito hour every night, und to get up at a definite time every niorning. Moreover, they should get up immediately on waking. Another rule was to train oneself to fal...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COFFEE ROLLS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

COFFEE KOLLS. One pound of flour, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, half a pint of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, half % tcaspoonful of salt, oue ounce of sugar. Dry and sift the flour, add baking pow der and salt, rub in the butter and sugar. Beat the egg and milk and form into a light dough with a fork. Knead very little. Form into rolls, brush with egg or milk, and bake rn a quick oven for ten or fifteen miautes.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOUR MILK PANCAKES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

SOUR MILK PANCAKES. .Sift together two cupfuls of flour, one snltspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of baking soda and one teaspoonful of sugar, add gradually two cupfuls of sour milk or cream, beating until bubbly. Stir in ono well-beaten egg and bake on a very hot, greased griddle. to rest and read. Membership carrieB , muuy privileges and opportunities for self-development. I feel sure that an institution on similar lines would be much appreciated by homeless boys, un der whose roof such wanderers as de scribed above could bo accommodated until their parents were communicated with or some suitable employment could be obtained.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO COOK OLD POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

TO COOK OLD POULTBY. There is no fowl so old but it will make a tender dish. After preparing the binl steam it until the fleih is ten der. Then stuff, the fowl with season ing place buttered paper on the breast, and place in a brisk oven. Baste con tinuously, using plenty of dripping. Serve with fried curls of bacon around the dish. Bread sauce should be served with roast fowL

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ADRIFT IN SYDNEY. ADVENTUROUS COUNTRY LADS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

ADRIFT IN 8YDNEY. ADVENTUROU8 COUNTRY LADS. , (By. 'V.J.') Tlie adventurous spirit in bays be tween the ages of 12 and 16 yaars is, at times, carried to daring extremes. When a paragraph appears in one of our d»ily papers: 'Lad, aged 14 (or thereabouts), missing from home, any information as to his welfare gladly received, etc,' ono feels a pang of pity for the distracted rolativos who, in this nay, appeal to tho public for news of their missing one. Recently a case of this kind was brought before, the notice, of an officer of tho Prisoners' Aid Association, Phillip Street, Byducy. Two lads, about 16 years of ago, but much younger in ap pearance, had been arrested and chargod before tho Children's Court with having no lawful visible means of support. The boys wore knickerbockers and did not appear to be more than 12. Bo (.uuso of their tender use tho magistrate was loth to send the homeless ones to gaol. And, sad to say, in this great city of Sydney, there is no other pro vision mad...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROMANCE TO TRAGEDY. QUEEN OF SPORTSWOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

ROMANCE TO TRAGEDY. QUEEN OP SPORTSWOMEN. One of thn must interesting romances in the annals of tlie Scottish aristocracy is re called by the death ot Captain Sir Edward Austin Stewart Richardson, Bnrt., who died in London from wounds received while in notion with his regiment, the 3rd Black Watch. Horn -12 years ago. Sir Edward came of a military stock who fully lived up to their time-honored motto, 'Honor gained' by valor.' lie was the tlftccnth baronet, hav ing succeeded his father iu 1895. The baronetcy was created in lt-30, and was dormant from IS21 to 1S37, when John Stewart Hichardson, who acted as Secretary to tho Order of the Thistle, assumed the title on being served heir of the twelfth baronet. Sir Edward saw considerable service in South Africa, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State. Including the actions of the Vet River, Hbonoster Hiver, Wittebersej), and WItpoort. . It was in 1904 that he married, under romantic circumstances, Lady Constance Mackenzie...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IS IT INEVITABLE? [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

IS IT INEVITABLE? 'It is computed that twenty minions of men are at death grips without mak ing mi appreciable change in tho position from week to week. There is, of course, un invisible change in progress. The sinews nf war aro diminishing and the staying power of all parties slowly giving out. The money cost is from £8,000,000 to £10,1)00,000 a week. The wastage in the armies, in killed, wounded and miss ing, is about 125,000 every seven days, or a toll of nearly 20,000 u day. These things cannot go on indefinitely. The re sources of the world nro not equal to their loug continuance. But while they last we stand nppalled before their magni tude; and the question recurs bb it never did before — Is this renwUablef or Is it Inevitable ? ' ' — Melbourne ' Ag«. '

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MY MOTHER'S HOUSE BY THE RHINE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

MY MOTHER'S HOUSE BY THE RHINE. No portrayal of tho suffering and cruelty of tliu wur has come to our notice that for pure poetry and. pathos Is superior to this,' says the New York Independent. 'Those who arc unable to sympathlso with IU Ger man point of view may change, tho scene from the Rhino to tho Seine, whore It would, unfortunately, bo equally true.' 1 J ? r™,0-? uro by H- '? Ewcrs- and tran» atcd by Oscar Mueller, in the New York Sun. .My mother Is nn old lady, Perhaps sixty or oven moro Klin flnOH lint Illrn In annnl* ..1.....* tu My mother is a German woman. Is only ono of so many millions. My mother's house overlooks tho Rhine, It's a gay house, it's a free house. It's an artist's house, Resounding with laughing and gaiety During fifty years and more. Now mother converted the guy houso nlo a sad house, a hospital. ?? Sixteen beds did she give, and in each Lies a soldier. ? ????« IN EACH LIES A SOLDIER. My old mother writes:— In your Indian Room -ies a sergeant, I'V^mli1'...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOR WOMAN'S EYE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

OTFOR WOMN'8 EYE. (Bjr 'Blue Bird.') The long tunic which is becoming so popular gives an effect of fullness and freedom which is prophetic of actual freedom to come. For the present, skirts, that confine the limbs below the full tunic and even narrower than be fore, and femininity must go hobbled by Fashion 'a decree till tho full tunic evolve into a revival of fuller skirts. The stylish costume iu our illustration is of taffeta ? the long tunic is iimshed at the Bide gore with buttons. The evening dress of to-day is in de mand for more than one occasion, and must meet other cases than that of the ball room or reception hall, and for that reason it is sometimes rather difficult to distinguish between it and the tea gown, which is, in reality, a very near relation. Tho evening wrap or coat is another closely related garment, and indeed, at times, so elaborate are all three, and so alike in design and material that it takes an expert to say which is which. The more substantial the ma...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR ARMY OF 3,000,000. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

OUR ARMY OF 3,000,000. 'At odds of one to three and one to five the 'mercenary' English, tho 'degenerate1 * rench, have beaten tho soldier of tha Ger man superman,' say»,\Mr. H. G. Wells in the Dally Chronicle. \\ '---, 'While tho Zeppelins boast;' tho French und British aeroplanes do; thu seas arc ours; for two months the Germans havo ceased to ad vance, irtid tho armies of tho counter-stroke gather against them. Steadily tho reserves of Franco perfect their equipment; Britain, which had never fully contemplated this enormous struggle, rises now steadfastly to tho occasion. As fast as It enlarges its mili tary establishment recruits pour in. 'Sext your Britain will have 3,000,000 mon under, arms over and above Its armed civilians at home. A certain foolish fussing in tho less responsible sections of tho Eng lish press, a certain muddling with figures which failed to count anything but the ncccsslon to 'Kitchoner's army' and ignorec 'the growth of the Territorial establishment have ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEAT OF GOVERNMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

SKAT OP GOVERNMENT. 'Mr. Hughes 's humorous freak of transferring tho Federal offices to Sydney has created apprehension as well as amusement. Iu Victoria it is regarded as a warning that the seat of Government is only temporarily located there. In Sydney the hope has been revived that the permanent seat of government will not be at Canberra, but that by an evasion or amendment of the Constitution Syduoy in this respect will ore long be permitted to come into her own.' — Bris- bane 'Daily Miiil.'

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WORLD FINANCED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

THE WORLD FINANCED. ? « toTth?.u-lr!li'nSrCnharSe wnk'h l'° «'or brought London, Paris, and Berlin. The financial directorships wero interlaced, branches or agents existed in nearly al the clthfs of ? — ??« «????? ui iiiu new. *-ionstor com panics and corporations welcomed sharehol ders of all nationalities, with very 'little re SSTV°r «le,d|l-l°™«lc alliances, known or worhi S'h '* 'hreatenttl »-e peace of the world. The hill on London provided a world currency, and the city was a perfect cos mopolls of credit and commerce ' cos 'It was a truism six months ago to say that nationality was no obstacle to business arrangements. Inside tho high protoiuve barriers of Russia Englishmen and Germans bu It factories in rlvnlry or collaboration. British companies worked In Germany Gor man companies worked In Great Britain, trench and German bankers competed In' Russia and Turkey. British armament linns were assisting tho Turkish Navy, while Ger man officers reorganised tho Turkish Army at th...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REMARKABLE EFFECTS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

REMARKABLE EFFECTS. 'Tho effect of the war in many ways was remarkable. Before it, Lloyd George was the most intensely-detested man in England, if ono was to judge public feeling by the tone of the London press. But tho London press is para lysed bv warty influence, and in the ilarniesworth kenuel all the dogs bark as the 'Times' barks. According to them, Lloyd George before the war was a political quacK, uut niminwufl i« mnrvollous way in which ho saved the credit of the commercial world made him the most popular man, and the createst financial genius. '—Rev. John I'crgusou, St. Stephen's Presbyterian Church, Sydney, roturned from a trip.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHASED ON HIGH SEAS. BRITISH CAPTAIN'S RUSE. THE KARLSRUHE AGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

CHASED ON HIGH SEAS. BRITISH CAPTAIN'S RUSE. THE KARLSRUHE AGAIN. The old days when pirates roved the high seas in search of prey and plunder are vivid ly recalled in these limes by such incidents as that which attended the capture of a Itritish steamer by the German cruiser Karls ruhe. The captain of the British ves.sjl proved himself a man of resource, but fate was agnlnst him. ns this story, related by the Daily News special correspondent, Mr. W. M. Duckworth, shows. At two a.m. one clear pacific morning, the British shin M ? dis covered slio was being overhauled slowly by another .ship having all lights out. She fol lowed close iu the wake of the M ? till daybreak. It was the Krefeld, one of the supply squadron of ships escorting the Karls ruhe. Then a long, dark stream of lloathm gossamer came up with tho sun, and out o£ Ihe cloud-bank steamed the Karlsruhe. The British captain stopped his engines under the Impression that it was a friendly visitor, but when tho German tlag was...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CITY OF GRAVES. WOMEN CLAMOR FOR FOOD. SNOW-SWEPT STREETS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 27 February 1915

CITY OF GRAVES. WOMEN CLAMOR FOR POOD. SNOW-SWEPT STREETS. i!i-avi..«, (jravis— orphans, orphans— a coun try desolate. Such Is Belgium to-day, ot wliii-h a vivid peii-iiletiire Is Blvon by Mr. I lii-ndore Waters, special representative of lh.- AniiTlcan llhristlan Herald. Mr. Waters -?aw fin- himself a cargo of food distributed ihi-miKli Hit! good offices of tho Commission for I:ellir In Ueli;ium, who have their head ? ?Hires at :i London Wall Ilulldlngs. 'In Antwerp.' said Mr. Waters, 'I saw nvi-r ime thousand poorly clad women, one ? ? .-?iioom siiiijier^, siunu smvertng in me snow and slush nailing for food to lie doled nut I' them, and this under tho shadow 'f a big hotel wIhto well-fed, well-clad soldiers drank and made merry. In .Maliui-.i, under the shadow of tho cathedral, its walls caved in, Its old stnined-glass win li.ws now but ragged remnants of a beauty that can never bo replaced, I saw men, women, and children gazing disconsolately -'. Ihe ruins ot the houses that onc...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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