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Elephind.com contains 185,322 items from Prairie Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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GOOD i'ENCE . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

GOOD iENCE . [ for iliv Prairie Farmer . BY s . n . fixiiv-iIIKits . . MESSRS . EDITORS : I had the pto asure a 1 few ( fay s 1 since to receive the lirst ifuirtbcr of the Prairie Farrrier for this year . I have perused its pages over and over again , From them I learned many important facts—nearly enough to remunerate me for the subscrijition money . I am a young fanner myself , and stand in need of the advice which is generally contained in such periodicals . Though a young man , ( just about 22 , ) I have noticed that Good fences make good neighbors . Nothing ruffles our feelings so soon , arid generates hard thoughts so often ; as to have our cattle , horses , and hogs ill treated by the owners of fields , who are too lazy to make strong fences . A man who keejts low fences may expect his neighbors stock to break over . And if he abuses tlrem , he is sure to incur the displeasure of their owners . Men who have the poorest fences are generall y most apt lo uial-tr eat the slock t...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
GREEtflN (^ = EXPERIMENTAL . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

GREEtflN (^ = EXPERIMENTAL . ( For Ihc Prairie Farmer . liv A . SMITH . MKSSIIS . EDITORS i I am aware that February is rather late to bid yoii a happy new year , andMarch will still be later id extend the same greeting to your readers . But if you aiid your readers have willingl y forgotten mo among the irfany more interesting agreeable follows who have alMady enrolled their names on your list of contributors for the entertainment , of your passengers for the voyage of 1845 ; yet that never failing source of gab —self-esteem , prompts it ; c to wish to be recognised as one of so liotiora- hie a company . Therefore , I hope an empty birth or at least some corner of the steerage may yet be vacant even if it be under a harrow , that I may stow myself and be permitted to crawl out at your month festival . So , Messrs . Editors and fellow passengers , a prosperous voyage to you all ; and while up may I not be . permitted to tell you all what I have been doing and what I intended to do ....

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
WOOL GROWING . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

WOOL GROWING . [ For the Prairie Farmer . BY is . railKlNS Jit . MESSIIS . EDITORS : The wool-growing business of the West is becoming so important that any information relative to the management of sheep is looked upon with interest . Believing tliat unsuccessful as well-as successful experiments are beneficial to bo known , I give you tho result of my experience in keeping sheep in Illinois . jCbout , tho middle of October , . 1842 , I reached home ( Montalona , McHcnry co „ 111 . ) with a drove of sheep from • the southpart of Ohio . They wore considered to ho in good condition-for drove sheep , though somewhat worn , b y a journey of 400 miles . The weather , while they were on the road , was dry , and the roads very dusty ; being obliged lit fori ] and swim the streams , the wool was completely filled with ih ^ t . The prairie grass had been sometime cut down with the frost , and before the sheep had time or opportunity to recruit , the unprecedented early and severe winter of ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SMUT . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

SMUT . [ For Qie Prairie Farmer , I MESSRS . EDITORS : In your last number I noticed two articles on the subject of smut in wheat , in which the writers soctn to convey the opinion that smut regelates and grows ; or that smut in seed will infect the future wop with the same disease . Now my limited experience has taught mo to think differently . In the fiill of 1343 I sowed ten bushels of winter wheat very much mixed with smut ( il being the first winter wheat . I ever attempted to raise , except a few bushels sowing , the fall previous . . Some of my neighbors said it would spoil the cr «|> , while others asserted that it would not allcci it ; and my opinion agreeing with the latter , I sowed it . without an } preparation whatever . On harvesting the crop last summer , there was not a head of smut , to be seen . Will some one of your numerous cormsjioiidciiis inform us through the columns of the Farmer on what facts or experience of his own his belief in ihc contagious n...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
WATERING CATTLE . WEEDS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

WATERING CATTLE . WEEDS . [ For the Prairie Farmer . BY R . CHUNKY . MESSRS . EDITORS : I wish to give some of my experience . First , how to water caiile at pond holes or sloughs . The water becomes frozen to the ground , in very cold weather , some six to ten feet from the edge , and calls are afraid to go on the ice far enough to got water . The best method I have found is to take some straw , hay , or shavings , and make a road on the ice to tiie spot where I bey can get abundance of water . To the road thus ¦ made , apply plenty of water when the weather is cold , and in a short time you will have « road that your entile will not be afraid to walk upon . This 1 find much easier than to bring water to the edge of the ice in a pail to water my stock as I did at first . I have seen many the present winter , watering their stock with a pail , who probably have never thought of the simple method above described . 1 wish to give a word of caution to the western farmer against the fir...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
PROFITS OF WOOL-GROWING IN ILLINOIS , COM -PARED WITH TENNESSEE , VIRGINIA , & c ; [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

PROFITS OF WOOL-GROWING IN ILLINOIS , COMPARED WITH TENNESSEE , VIRGINIA , & c ; DY ABRAHAM S 5 IITH . MKSSRS . EDITORS : According to your request I will endeavor to answer the inquiries in Mr . Skinner s letter . And first , in regard to the cost of keeping sheep in the moun * tains of Tennessee , North Carolina , and Virginia : I have a right to be somewhat competent to judge of that matter , having been born and raised in those very mountains . CLIMATE , li is known to all persons that short winters are desirable lo wool growers . —and therefore the mountains of Tennessee , North Carolina , and Virginia might seem to possess a great advantage over the prairies of Illinois ; but such , I can say from actual experience , is not ihe fact ; and all persons who have resided in both locations will bear me out in the assertion . We will take for comparison all that part of Illinois south of 40 degrees of latitude , embracing about half the State , and compare it with tlie c...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ORCHARD AND GARDEN [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

ORCHARD AND GARDEN FORCING VEGETABLES BY GALVANISM . Experiments have been frequently made , during many years , both in England and in this country , which show , that the growth of plants may be hastened in a remarkable manner by the agency of electricity and galvanism . More frequently these experiments have been made b y bringing currents of electricity lo bear upon the vegetables by means of an electric machine , or by the use of the Lcyden Jar , There is a difficulty in this mode of operating ; as a too copious discharge of the electric fluid is liable to kill the plants at once ; and in the hands of any but scientific persons , other accidents might happen . A far more simple , and at all events mo . c harmless method , is that used by several experimenters last season in New York . It is a sort of galvanic battery , of very simple construction , < the materials for which can easily be had , and may be used by any person of common sense . Tho mode is to take a piec...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
—¦—^*^>*' i ' ¦¦ ' THE GARDEN . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

—¦—^*^>* i ¦¦ THE GARDEN . There is no sjiot of ground on the farm any where near so profitable as the garden can . be made , if well managed . If a farmer should once be obliged lo buy all he consumes , and would then keep an accurate account of his purchases , he would at once see that ihe part taken from the garden would form no such insignificant proportion of the expense as he supposes . It is none the less valuable because he docs not purchase ils products , and tho ratio of profits saved from it is precisely as large as ilinugh it were not saved . Before this jiaper reaches ils readers , many of them will have got their early vegetables under way . If ihcy were up lo the matter , indeed , early lettuce , onions , and tomatoes were sown last fall ; or at any rale the giound was prepared for them , and they , with peas , were put in wiih the first opportunity this spring . Sujiposing however that Jilllc or nothing is yet done , the first thing will be to clean off th...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
UNKNOWN [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

QUESTIONS FROM PENNSYLVANIA . A farmer sending us his subscription from Fayette co ., Pennsylvania , writes as follows : Tho land is probably rich in Illinois ; but to keep it so is tho groat matter , after all . You certainly have some good farmers . I would suggest to them ( o sow clover with timothy and fallow more for wheal ; I wish some of your Illinois farmers would give us the amount , of their wheat crop per acre , as ours arc a little credulous about the reports they hear . Hero wc raise from 10 to 25 bushels of wheat , 35 to 40 of cow , and 30 to 60 ofoats . Have any of you tried lime on corn and wheat ? What would be the result ? Our correspondent forgot to give us the name of his post office . fl ^ r A company of Bostonians have established extensive rope-walks at the port of Manilla , in thiEast Indie * , which are worked by steam power .

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
ROTATION . FALLOWING . LIMB . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

ROTATION . FALLOWING . LIMB . [ For the Prairie Farmer . MESSKS . EDITORS : Will you permit mo through ( lie medium of your paper lo lay before its numerous readers a few hasty remark s , suggested by a short tour 1 made last fall through the settlements on Fox River , between Bristol and St . Charles ; than which a belter tract of land need not be , for all the purposes of agriculture . Where nature has done so much , is ii not to be regretted that tlie fanner—and owner of the soil , loo—? lHid ihrotigh bad management allow his land to deteriorate , not only in the produce , but in its value . I was struck with tho total want , of system and consequent light crojis . On many of the farms through which 1 passed , the stubble did not . indicate more than 20 to 25 bushels of wheat jier acre . Will any man of judgment in such matters say that those lands are not capable of producing nearly double that quantity if properly managed . But the evil docs noi slop with the loss in bulk , yie...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
CHESS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

CHESS . [ For the Prairie Farmer . HV OKOItOK IIOI . I . 1 S . - MKSSHH , EniTons : Does wheat turn to chess ? Not that I am by any means certain of communicating any thing new , but to elicit thought and comparison , and lo carry out in a feeble way some of I lie views aimed at by tho Prairie Farmer , I shall take the negative of this question , and endeavor lo rebut some of ( he arguments for tho affirmative which have appeared in your paper . It will be necessary for that purpose to look back gpmo distance . I shall therefore proceed to notice first Mr . Gifliirds communication , on jiage 90 , vol . ii , Union Agriculturist . He says , First , Wheat freezing out in ihe spring will cause chess . Secondly , Feeding it off with cailile afirr it lias attained 12 or 14 inches in height . Thirdly , Neglecting to harrow if . in . Now , sirs , from what little experience I have had in western funning , there is very liitle wheat sown without chess , which is a very hardy plant , and will...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
AN AGRICULTURAL PAPER—THE FARMER'S NEED . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

AN AGRICULTURAL PAPER—THE FARMERS NEED . [ For the Prairie Farmer . nv A . P . W . H . LITTS . MESSRS . EDITORS :. In endeavoring to get subscribers for your paper , many of my neighbors lo whom I have spoken upon the subject , say they are not able to take it ; my answer is , that is the way to become able . But the dollar seems lo be minus ; and yet these same men can pay for one , two , or three political journals , without seeming to regard ihe expense . Now this state of things seems to mo to be decidedly wrong ; if a man lakes but ; onc paper , it should certainly be one which is devoted to the business in which he is engaged ; if he takes more , lot him select to suit his taste . But I hold it to be the duty of .-every farmer to take at least one agricultural paper . He is required to do . so by his own interest , by the interest of his family , and of his country . ¦ . . . - , ; If the farmer is in a prosperous condition , all other kinds of business will flourish ; if he is...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT fX / * Hon . KIRRY BENEDICT of Macon county received the following letter at Springfield , from one of his constituents , and Mr . Patterson must not quarrel with his friend and able Representative , for permitting it lo appear in print . It was only at our urgent solicitation that Mr . B . consented to its use in this manner . The letter is a confidential , and therefore free , expression of tho views of a man evidently possessed of gcqd strong common sense , and who is a warm friend of popular instruction ; and though he differs from us in some of his views , he is honest in them , and wo like to comoin contact with such a man . Wc publish it entire , except erasing one or two political allusions . Sonic of our readers may not know ihc origin of the memorial referred to , or its contents and object ; . We iborcfbre say , a committee of three , II . M . Wead , D . . 1 . Piiickney , and 3 . S . Wright , were appointed by the Peoria convention lo memorialize ih...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
VETERINARY DEPARTMENT [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

VETERINARY DEPARTMENT DEATH OF CATTLE IN CORNFIELDS . We have seen during ihc winter several published accounts of the death of cattle in cornfields , though no such accounts have been communicated to us . We noticed one of these , sometime since ; but as no description of symptoms was given , wc could only guess at the xausc . This wc supposed might be smut . On dissection , however , it appears that quaniities of ihe fibres of corn husks arc found lodged and wadded in the third stomach or manyplies , commonly called ihe manyfolds ; forming a case somewhat analogous lo that called Mad Itch , described in our third volume ; as also lo that in the present , as occurring among sheep . It would appear to be caused by eating too much food from which the natural juices have dried out—or , perhaps , from some cause , become partially acrid and malignant , Diseases of this sort are . highly inflammatory ; and require in the case of cattle , very prompt treatment . Claier says that if the i...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
DRY BELLY ACHE IN SHEEP . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

DRY BELLY ACHE IN SHEEP . [ For the Prairie Farmer . BY JOHN IUIISTOW . MESSRS . EDITORS : The disorder mentioned by your correspondent F . B . B . in the January number , prevailed twelve years ago in Maine and some olhcr parts of New England , and some parts of New York . The season was uncommonly wet—die grass crop very heavy , and much of it was cut in rainy weather , and put into the barn in bad condition . The sheep were put . into winter quarters in not their usual good condition ; after having been fed on dry fodder a few weeks , ihc disorder mentioned by F . B . 15 . appeared in a great majority of the flocks , whether large or small . Few recovered-that were severel y attacked ,-and those that did recover became very poor—noi one in a hundred raising her lamb , if dropped before the . first , of May . Various medicines were used , but without , any good ellect . _ Those who became satisfied that the mischief was occasioned by had hay , and substituted other food as much as...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SWEET POTATO CULTURE . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

SWEET POTATO CULTURE . [ For the Prairie Farmer . BY C 1 UUW 5 S 11 . I .-UIRAJW-E . MESSRS . EDITORS : I very cheerfully comply with your request , and proceed lo give you ihe results of my experience , in the culture of this vegetable . Having had a good deal of experience , when in : the south , in raising the sweet potato , and having endeavored by numerous experiments to find out the best plan , I can at least give you , for the use of the intelligent farmers of Illinois , what little I know upon the subject . The increased attention which has been given even during the past two years in our own immediate region , has resulted in convincing us of ihe fact that we arc able to cultivate the sweet potato to considerable advantage . I now proceed lo give you my method—premising however that it is not essentiall y different from lhat generall y pursued—save in the manner of preparing feed . ] plant in hills—good large hills ; pulling in each two halves of potatoes—the polato cut tra...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SUNDRY QUESTIONS . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

SUNDRY QUESTIONS . The proceedings of the National Convention of Farmers and Gardeners at the American Institute in the city of New York on the 12 th of Oct ., 1844 , has been sent us by some friend . It contains in addition to the address by the President , Gen . Talmadge , several questions , addressed to farmers , which seem to us calculated to elicit much information , and to fix the minds of those interested on the true subjects of thought . and inquiry , and to give greater definiteness to the true modes of promoting improvement . We subjoin a few which are more applicable to our wants and hope they will be found of aid to correspondents . We . wish also to call attention to one thing by . askin * a question—What is your usual depth of plowing ? 1 Where the system of improvement has not been adopted , what diminution of crops per acre has taken place in your district , or within your knowledge ? Do you use peat , muck , lime , plaster of Paris , marl , refuse hsh , or any othe...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
SALVING SHEEP . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

SALVING SHEEP . \ For tlie Prairie : Vnrmtv . MhssRS . EDITORS : Having read ih . thc Prairie Farmer of this month A Farmers directions for salving sheep , I do not understand how a man can cover the skin of a sheep all over with two or three ounces of salve when there is so much wool to prevent him from spreading it as he could do on a naked skin ; and as the skin must he all covered , I think 3 inches too wide between the openings of the wool for ihe small quantity of salve to spread so as to meet between the openings or shades . ¦ ¦ ¦ , I am quite a stranger in the country , and have no inclination lo dispute with A Farmer ; I only wish Ip let you know the most common method of salving or smearing sheep in my native country . As for the niost common salve it is made of tar , mixed with butter Or paint oil : ; the tar is measured into a tub or vessel where it is to be mixed ; then to every gallon of tar , six pounds of buffer or palm oil is weighed into a pot and racked—one stirri...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE FLOW Ell GARDEN . [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

THE FLOW Ell GARDEN . Reader , did you ever know a lady who wasfound of flowers and cultivated them , who was a shrew , and made herself disagreeable to all her friends by her ill temper ? We never did . Did you ever know a lady who cultivated flowers who was a slattern , and kept her house and family in dirt and disorder ? Wo never did . Did you ever know a lady who cultivated flowers who was hot in a good degree amiable ? We never did . Did you ever know a case in which the cultivation of flowers did a lady any harm in health , mind , or morals ? We never did—never ! Home should have flowers about it . They belong to and go lo make home . Just imagine home without any flowers , about or in it . Can you do it ? It is a hard task . It will soon be time lo sow the seeds ; for annuals should not be sown till the ground is warm and ihey will come up immediately . Many of them will come up sooner by soaking in warm water a little time , and if the weather is changeable , there is great ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
TIMOTHY AND CLOVEIl IN STEPHENSON CO , [Newspaper Article] — Prairie Farmer — 1 April 1845

TIMOTHY AND CLOVEIl IN STEPHENSON CO , nr V . O . CROCKER . [ We never recollect to have received a letter from Stephenson county for publication yet ; but a friend of ours happening lo read the following to us , we persuaded him to let us have it . As it contains nothing incendiary , we presume its author will not complain . ] . I see by the Prairie Farmer that you have some anxiety about , grass for fall feed . No subject should receive the attention of farmers more than this . Cultivated grass would shorten the season of feeding stock about two months . Yon speak of mixing herds-grass and red-lop with clover . Now my experience leads me to advise to sow clover alone , and let it get one year s start , and then you may sow your herds-grass if you please . I judge from this : two years ago this spring I sowed a piece to herds-grass , and then cross-sowed it to clover . In sowing the herds-grass I made some balks . On these balks the clover did tolerably , but among the herds-grass ...

Publication Title: Prairie Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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