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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

Thr Indian Advocatr. 268 needed, and the Prefect did not hesitate to make use of his persona patrimony, sent to him by his family just about that time. However, the little community did not make a long stay at Atoka. In the very center of the two present Territories, between the two forks of the Canadian river, was a settlement of Catholic Pottawatomie Indians. Because at that time the Catholics in the Territory were scarce and far apart, and this settlement was in the very heart of the Prefecture, Rt. Rev. Fr. Robot decided to transfer his little community to the Pot tawatomie. Nation. Buildings were erected, and as the .nec essary lumber was to be freighted over from Atoka, the near est railway station, to Sacred Heart Mission (75 miles), Atoka never suffered from the want of priests, Father Robot and other priests taking turns. In 1885 and '86, the Santa Fe was built, and Purcell became for Sa cred Heart Mission a 35-miles nearer railroad station and trading point. Then Rev. Fr. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

269 The Indian Advocate. to locate a priest at that place. First, in 1891, Rev. Placidus Disrreck, O. S. B., stayed there only a few months, and in 1893 Rev. Ramiro Fornelli, O. S. B., went also to reside in Atoka, but before very long he was taken away, because the poor mission offered neither support nor encouragement. From that time Atoka has been a mission attended monthly from Lehigh. LEHIGH. Lehigh is a mining camp, situated nine miles northwest of Atoka. In 1882 some prospectors found a rich vein of coal a few miles away from Atoka, and secured leases from the Indian authorities to explore the same. The first mine oper ated in Atoka county was only five miles from the town of that name. The works kept on moving in a northwesterly direction until, in 1888, the camp reached the present and more permanent location. As a rule, a good number of Cath olics are to be found among the miners, so we find Rt. Rev. Isidore Robot, O. S. B., visiting Lehigh at the very begin ning of its ex...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 270 plete destruction of the same. After that disheartening event the primitive schoolhouse was moved with the camp a mile north, remodeled, fitted up in a better manner, and ever since has been used for school and church purposes. In August, 1891, Rev. D. Hippolyte Topet, O. S. B., was sent to take charge of Lehigh and surrounding missions. His first attention was given to the school. Being unable to se cure Sisters for that purpose, he turned the management of the school over to lay teachers until the year 1897. In the meanwhile, as the church was nothing better than a box house, and two little rooms composed the pastor's residence, he turned his efforts to the improvement of both. The church was ceiled and painted, the grounds fenced in, a stable was built, and a dining-room and kitchen was put up. After unsuccessful efforts to secure the services of the Sisters of Mercy in 1893, '94 and '96, he was favored with a colony of Benedictine Sisters from Shoal Cree...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

271 The Indian Advocate. Pastor and Sisters continued their noble work. One of the Sisters died in Lehigh last winter. An addition was made to the school last August. The strike is still going on, and not a few of the old Catholics have left the place. Some new ones have come in, necessitating the keeping up of the paroch ial institution. This year again the Sisters' Convent had to be enlarged and improved, and just now the church is having weather-boards put on and a neat steeple built, and for all these expenses the pastor has to depend very little on home support, but mostly on Divine Providence and charity. o a a WHAT DO YOUR .CHILDREN READ? We have often called your attention to this important point. In order to give more weight to our repeated warn ings, we will cite only one example of the horrible conse quences of bad literature. The news comes from Toledo, O., under date of June 6th: "Leroy Grove, the 16-year-old son of a well-doing farmer near Napoleon, was given to readin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 272 JTHE INDIAN ADVOCATE! x uuiiMitu iy nit: iiuuuuiiiiitj r iuiiurt ui - II SACRED HEART MISSION, OKL A IIOM A. i ----- - tt- A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo. Mccrschacrt, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories, TERMS OK" StlHHCItlPTIONi Single Copies 15c. Annual Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . . .75c rForeign ; $1.5. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. l'KIVILlIOKHi i. E cry Subscriber and Benefat tor will participate :n all the merits, prayers and pood works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sunn ecry First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered e cry First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of Septembe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

273 The Indian Advocate. The Supreme Court of the United States has decided that divorces are valid only when granted in the States where the parties have lived. This is a severe blow to Western divorce mills that have been supplying the Eastern market with grass widows, quack-grass widowers, and candidates for tandem polygamy and polyandria. There seems to be a lot of unnecessary space wasted in the newspapers in harsh criticisms of the action of Mr. Wood, the young man who drew the lucky first choice at the the drawing for claims in the new country. He simply exer cised the right which the Government conferred upon him to take what he considered the most valuable piece of land and nine-tenths of his critics would have did the very same thing. We are inclined to the opinion that personal envy of the good fortune which chance bestowed upon him prompts the major ity of his critics in their utterances. Say, young man, there is one thing you cannot do. You can't make a success .unless ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 274 Disobedience is the beginning of evil and the broad way to ruin. If we have a petition to present to august and powerful men, with what respect and reverence do we not approach them! How much more profound, then, should be the respect and humility with which we offer our supplication to the Lord God of the Universe! The drawing for claims in the Kiowa-Comanche country came off on scheduled time and without any apparent hitch in the proceedings, and, we presume, satisfactorily at least to those who were so fortunate as to secure good claims while those who were left on the outside of the promised land can return to their homes and resume their wonted avocations, consoling themselves with the reflection that the land was "no great shakes after all," as we have heard some of them say. As a matter of fact, over half of the land subject to entry is said by those competent to judge to be suitable only for grazing, and should not be used for agriculture, as it will...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

275 The Indian Advocate. MRS. SURRATT INNOCENTLY HANGED. ... ... It is generally believed at the present time that Mary E. Surratt, who was hanged for complicity in the assassination of Lincoln, was innocent. During the A. P. A. excitement the bigots were fond of quoting the fact that Mrs. Surratt was a Catholic, as an instance of Catholic disloyalty. A dramatic episode in connection with her death, and which tends further to establish her innocence, is published in the New York Sun. John P. Brophy, now Clerk of the Court of General Ses sions, New York, was at the time of Lincoln's assassination, an instructor in St. Aloysius' College, in Washington. After the conviction of Mrs. Surratt, Weichman, who boarded in her houiie and was the chief witness against her, came to him and said that in spite of all he had sworn to, he thoroughly believed she was innocent of all knowledge of the plot against the President until after its consummation. Mr. Brophy deemed Weichman's statement so imp...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 276 known throughout the conspiracy as Lewis Payne. Powell, who was the son of a Florida clergyman, was, after Booth, the fiercest and most bloodthirsty of all the conspirators. He re tained to the last the stoical cynicism which he had shown from the first. In this mood Mr. Brophy found him a few hours before he was hanged. To his own impending fate he told Mr. Brophy he was utterly indifferent. He had played his part in the tragedy and was ready to take the consequences of an act in which he in no way regretted. But when he spoke of Mrs. Surratt, all traces of affectation disappeared. That woman, he protested by all that was held most sacred, was as innocent of the plot against Mr. Lincoln as the child unborn. Powell's manner was so earnest and so convincing that it made a profound impression upon Mr. Brophy. It was now about 9 o'clock in the morning. The execu tion was to take place between 11 a. m. and 1 p. m. Mr. Brophy, from Powell's cell, hurried straight...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

277 The Indian Advocate. These were Preston King and General James Lane. Presi dent Johnson was suspected of having a vacillating nature, and those who believed that justice had been done in the con viction of the conspirators did not want an appeal to the weak side of the President's character to succeed. Mr. Bro- phy tried to get past the guards, but tried in vain. He tried to get General Hartranft's note sent in to the President. In that also he failed. After nearly an hour's delay he was no nearer doing his errand of life and death than when he first arrived. His own h;'.lf-distracted frame of mind was intensi fied by the frantic entreaties of Miss Surratt, who, sobbing " and choking with grief, was clinging to him and begging him to do something. But what could he do? In every avenue that led toward ' t the President there was a gleaming bayonet, and behind the ' V; bayonet the stern, bronzed face of a soldier. Mr. Brophy was at the verge of despair, when suddenly a fine carria...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

0 The Indian Advocate. 278 lecturing tour in Pennsylvania at the time, and his narration of the incident of the note to President Johnson and the de layed execution did much to break down this particular scheme on the part of the General's opponents. A curious climax to the story of that tragic morning in Washington is the fact that Preston King, one of the men who headed off those who would have pleaded with the Presi dent for Mrs. Surratt, committed suicide by filling his pockets full of shot and jumping off a North river ferryboat in New York, while the other, General Lane, committed suicide by blowing out his brains somewhere in a Western State. HOW "UNCLE SAM" GOT HIS NAME The nickname "Uncle Sam," as applied to the United States Government, is said to have originated as follows: Samuel Wilson, commonly called "Uncle Sam," was a gov ernment inspector of beef and pork at Troy, N. Y., about 1812. A contractor, Elbert Anderson, purchased a quantity of provisions and the barrels we...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

279 The Indian Advocate. CATHOLIC MARTYRS IN AMERICA. ............. . It is often declared by certain non-Catholics that this is a Protestant country. The fact of it is that Catholics discov ered it, Catholics were its principal explorers, and Catholics did as much as any toward its development. As to religion, the only Church which has a true Martyr's roll in both Ameri cas is the Catholics. Here is a list of the brave missionaries, belonging to the Jesuit Order alone, who gave their lives for Jesus Christ on or about the Northern Lakes and the St. Lawrence River, while endeavoring to bring the light of the Gospel to the Indians. The most remarkable of the Jesuit Fathers who, during the seventeenth century, died in Canada, martyrs to their faith or apostolic zeal, were: i. Father de Noue, found frozen on the banks of the St. Lawrence, opposite Sorel, February 2, 1646. 2. Father Jogues, killed with a hatchet while preaching to the Iroquois, October 15, 1646. 3. Father Daniel, shot w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 280 1 one particular region, were added the slain missionaries from Franciscan and other orders, with secular priests losing their lives in other parts of America, North and South, the roll ty would be so long as tc astonish all who have not studied the matter. What Protestant sect can make so glorious a showing of true Apostolic zeal upon this American continent? Nay, can all denominations combined name one martyr in all America for 1 every twenty whom the Catholic Church can point to as having shed their blood among the savages in the two Americas? The transition, or hobbledehoy period, between boyhood and young manhood, when a youth is no longer a boy and not yet a man, is the most trying time of his life. This is the age my when the interrogation point assumes colossal proportions, when every faculty of his nature is asking questions and won dering what the future has in store for him. This is the time when great changes, the meaning of which he cannot solve...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

28 1 The Indian Advocate. THE LAST OF CUSTER'S MEN. All to the front, And none to the rear, With flags to the breeze And a ringing cheer, Down the ridge where the Indians lay, Went Custer's men to the fight that day! Brave Custer rode in front of his men The fire of battle was in his eye "Dismount! And form For the work ahead, And now for the fight!" Was all he said! Then rose again the soldier's cheer, The "battle yell" of Custer's men! And the bugle's note so loud and clear, That seemed to pierce the sky! Then answered back from vale and hill, And echoed back and echoed still The fierce Sioux battle cry. Then came the Cheyenne war cry dread, With a rush on left, and a rush on right, As fierce as the hot sun overhead, They came on to the fight; And every war whoop sounded then Meant death to Custer's men! Then fierce the yells of battle rose, Swift came the hand of death. The sun shone red through the powder smoke, As Custer met his foes, In front and rear and on each flank, And ci...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 282 IT PAYS TO BE ACCURATE, It is not safe to trust people who are habitually inaccu rate in their work. Even with the best intentions in the world, they become dishonest. Before they are aware of it, the habit of inaccuracy extends to their statements. They do not take pains to be thorough in anything they undertake, even in clearly expressing the truth. These people never carry much weight in a community, however honest in principle they may be, because no reliance can be placed on their words or work. You cannot depend upon what they tell you. If they are orators, they are dis credited; if they are at the bar, the judges always take their statemefits cum grano salts; if in the pulpit, they do not win the respect of the congregation. In fact, whatever those peo ple do, they are placed at a disadvantage because of their habit of inaccuracy. There is a great difference between going just right and a little wrong. These victims ot inaccuracy did not start right. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

283 The Indian Advocate. A BELL WITH A PATHETIC HISTORY. The city of Breslau lately celebrated the five hundredth anniversary of an occurrence which was memorable in the history of the town, and is known wherever German poetry finds a home. The bell which hangs in the southern tower of St. Mary Magdalen's Church, and is named "St. Mary's bell," but is usually known as "the poor sinner's bell," rang out morning and evening on the 17th of July to remind all who heard it that it was cast on that day 500 years ago. Next day, Sunday, the preacher reminded the congregation of the pathetic story which has made it single among bells howt when all was ready for the casting, the bell founder withdrew for a few moments, leaving a boy in charge of the furnace, warning him not to meddle with the catch that secured the seething metal in the cauldron, and then, terrified on seeing the molten metal beginning to flow into the mould, called to the bell founder for help. Rushing in and seeing what he ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 284 t w? n 11 jKjyjj.Juiy u p i - 4 Rev. D. Placidus, of Chickasha, I. T., came in the 20th and departed the 22d. Rev. D. Hippolyte, of Lehigh, I. T., spent a few days with us during the past month. Rev. Father Cermanus, of Shawnee, visited the Mission on August 20th, and returned on the 21st. Rev. D. Stanislaus, of Anadarko, Okla., visited us August 20th, and returned to his mission on the 22d. Rev. D. Aloysius returned on the 20th from Lehigh, I. T., where he had been staying for several weeks. Our School for Indian Boys is completed and furnished ready for opening the first week in September. Rev. Father William, of Purcell, I. T., came to the Mission on Au gust 20th, and departed for his mission the 22d. Rev. D. Constantine, of El Reno, Okla., arrived at the Mission on August 20th, and returned to his pastorate on the 22d. Our Parochial School for Boys and Girls will open the second week in September, under a corps of competent lay teachers. Rev. D. Leo, aft...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

285 The Indian Advocate. " A The new St. Mary's Academy is now completed and ready for occu pancy. It is handsome and imposing in appearance. The Sisters of Mercy will open their school the first week in September. Rev. D. Meinrad, of Norman, Okla., visited the Mission on August 20th. He was accompanied by several boys, who will enter our school in September, and who took this occasion to visit us. The Rev. Father and his young charges departed for their homes on the 22d. We are advised by telephone, as we place our last "forms" on the press, that Anadarko, Okla., was visited by a destructive cyclone on the night of the 20th of August. We are informed that two lives were lost, but we cannot at this writing obtain any definite information sis to the extent of the damage wrought by the storm. There is a good deal of liberty taken with the term "first-class" by many hotels. It Was our misfortune to encounter one of them over in the Creek country recently, which was first-class in nothi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

n The Indian Advocate Vol. XIII. OCTOBER, 1901. No. 10 NOW ' i There's but one word upon the face of Time f , ' That word is "Now." Heed it before you hear Life's evening chime Your head to bow. "Now" is the crisis of man's circumstances His life, his all: The trial of his fortitude his chances To rise or fall. , The column waits, the old flag floats on high " v ! , But soon the sun v ' , Will count a day lost and in sadness sigh, "No battle won!" i '2 I The potter's clay is in thy hands to mould An angel's face I Why leave it idly, to turn crude and cold 1 And lose its grace? ' Great Now, while yet we sing, you glide away , In mystic air, 5 sjf Out from the sunshine of the glad to-day w , On, on to where? i To-morrow, youth's bright harbinger, still thrives s 'Twill never be: ' If man should have a hundred thousand lives, He'd find in thee The power that made the lily first disclose k , Her wealth of white ' " The corner-stone from which Time's Temple rose ' "' ' The source of migh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1901

287 The Indian Advocate. " 4 - t .. . . .-..... -.... A lilt NAVAHU KtSfcKVATIUN. ! Legendary and Actual by cosmos mindelepf. Winter Hogans Continued from Hie September Number. The Navaho recognize two distinct classes of hogans the keqai or winter place, and the kcjin, or summer place; in other words, winter huts and summer shelters. Notwith standing the primitive appearance of the winter huts, resem bling mere mounds of earth hollowed out, they are warm and comfortable, and, rude as they seem, their construction is a matter of rule, almost of ritual, while the dedicatory ceremo nies which usually precede regular occupancy are elaborate and carefully performed. Although no attempt at decoration is ever made, either of the inside or the outside of the houses, it is not uncommon to hear the term beautiful applied to them. Strong forked timbers of the proper length and bend, thrust together with their ends properly interlocking to form a cone-like frame, stout poles leaned against the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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