ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
5,371 results
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

bearing bountiful crops each year. When the senator came to this coun try he brought with him from lowa two fine Hambletonian stallions and a tew fine-bred brood mares, intending to raise fine stock, and later he added cattle to his other enterprises. About five years ago he brought from the east ■ carload of pure-bred Shorthorn bulls, which he disposed of to his neighbors, and thus gave a valuable impetus to the raising of better beef stock in this section. Among their an nual products may be mentioned about four hundred tons of alfalfa. The orchards of Senator Pogue and others, planted at altitudes varying from 900 to 2,000 feet above sea level, are a standing object lesson to those who "want to be shown," and up to date this is the only section on the Pacific coast claiming to have raised apricots for over ten consecutive years without a single failure. In view of these facts it is surprising that the government engineers did not point out to the reclamation department that the u...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

Ifi (Uallula, a most favored Irrigation Section By Special Representative FROM a purely traffic point of view, a glance at the map of the state of Washington will show that the most favored community in the whole of the Pacific northwest is that lying abort Wallula Junction, in Walla Walla county. It is something like putting the cart before the horse to start off an irrigation story with the foregoing statement, but while soil and climatic conditions place the primary value upon farm lands, yet the ultimate value and the earning capacity per acre of arable and culti vated lands must inevitably be regu lated by the traffic conditions first mentioned. Of course, this implies thni the traffic conditions bear upon the one great question of markets. The farmer living near Wallula has the best of the argument as against his fellow in any other part of the Pa cific northwest. If he lives near Wal lula and can raise good crops, he is in dependent for life. He has at his doors the finest ma...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

Reclaiming Arid Lands of Northwest •By Thomas Cooper, Land Commissioner, N. /'. fiy. NO SINGLE feature of the devel opment of the Great North west —the states of North Dakota! Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon —is more significant of future greatness than the work done during the least decade in bringing the semi-arid land under cultivation and in developing methods by which great areas are made immensely pro ductive. Irrigated lands produce never fail 'ng crops. The land and the water, primary elements in crop production, are known quantities and can be de pended upon. Adjacent to the prin cipal areas of the northwest in which irrigation development is now in pro gress are splendid home markets waiting to take all that the land will produce. The land to be brougiu under culti vation through the work of the United States Reclamation Service, the or ganization through wiilch the Federal government is carrying out the largest scheme of irrigation develop ment and irrigating works ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

18 AGRICULTURAL PI2OOKESS IN SNOIIO MISII COUNTY By )• P« I-IITOOV, llorMrulhir.il Inspector I^HB PAST two or three years have brought about a transformation in the agricultural development of Bnohomlth county. It is suddenly entering upon B new era because of the varied possibilities in agriculture, due to the proven congenial conditions that make for agricultural success and at tract the agriculturalist and new set tler endeavoring to better circum stances. This development is entirely due to natural causes, and is of a steady, substantial growth, to stay and not be impaired by the reaction that usually follows a boom. That the nation is entering upon a new epoch in agricultural development will not be denied. The success in farming today is due to applied sci entific principles, arid not to the se cret mysteries and notions as cher ished by the farmer of the past. Through keen competition in present day agriculture its many phases are being segregated because of the neert of thor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

Homeseekers Attention! Buy a farm in the heart of the Puget Sound country. Only two hours ride from Seattle, where market prices average higher the year round than in any other city in America. $1222 to $15— Per Acre WATER. FRONT $25.00 PER ACRE $5.00 Per Acre Down, Balance on Reasonable Terms* WE HAVE H^& i^^ma££z/yy^/w/f 7,400 ACRES NKiIFC^ LOGGED OFF LANDS P^^Stl^^ FOR SALE W^l^l f> Gtft^^ -.-In • the northern part of ■;: Snohoraish County, wjjijjjll E^lL^lA Washington, fronting on Puget Sound. W/J//ff(p OAK HARBOR jk§fe>W vSTUDY THE; MAP [{Kill W^UZSA'Ginth* hfINWOOD «+* STUDY THE MAP iM^rWT^^iß^K: And you will be convinced that these lands are II^IeS^V yI *^Sttl located in the most central and accessible part ffl^^^/^^^l^^ I^l ;of the Puget Sound district. ' I^^^^^ / J^\ Quick Rail and Water Transportation *" "^^^^""^^fc^ to All Sound Cities • , . $%lvC^^^^^^mm Ideal sites for Dairy Ranches, Poultry fa JlPw" 'ty^Mmf /\ ( Ranches, Stock Raising, Large and Small fl mj °...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

20 POULTRY , H. L. BLANCHARD CommunioatlOM for this department are solicited. Personal experiences de taih-d ami question! prove of great ben .■tit Write to H. L. Blamhard at Had lock. Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Se attle. Squab Raising for Profit. (By E. L. Reber.) The writer has visited the lofts of a number of persons who are in the squab raising business for profit. Il is no wonder that more who enter the business are not succeeding, if they follow the programs of the lofts vis ited. The birds were in one big house, young and old were together, mated and unmated birds lived side by side, the bathing water had stood for sev eral days, much of the grain was fed on the ground in the fly instead of in the house, and there were general evi dences of neglect. Birds that are not confined will stand for this sort of thing and still do well, but those in confinement must have the closest at tention. If they don't get it they will either die or prove worthless as breed ers. Some people...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

til it is finer than ever. The grand stand has been painted, the office ar rangement is entirely different and the midway and ground arrangements have been changed. The offices have been placed under the south end of the grand stand. They are far more commodious than they were in the main exposition building. The mid way will be south of the exposition building with a broad street through it. Concessions will be placed along the track fence opposite the exposition entrance. The machinery exhibits will stand about where the dog show tent, stood last year, the kennel club will move west a short distance and the W C. T. U. headquarters will be built where the old band stand stood. No animal on the farm begins to feed profitably so early as the lamb. HOWS THIS? We offer One Hundred Dollars' Reward for any case of Catarrh that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure. F. J. CHENEY & CO., Props.. Toledo, O. We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney for the last 15 years, and believe ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

• >.» Sheep Husbandry in Western Oregon Dr. JAHES WITHYCOMBE. Oregon Experiment Station THE DOMESTIC sheep is cosmo politan, probably more so than any other (arm animal. Some breeds are capable of adaptation to many varying conditions of altitude and soil, thriving alike on the rich lowlands i>ut a few feet above the sea level and upon the mountain heights. where scanty but rich and tender her bage is found. The many breeds of sheep owe their existence largely to local enviroments of Which altitude 1 plays a conspicuous part. For economic purposes all breeds may be divided into three classes, each having its characteristic habitat : First, the long wools, which feed upon the luxuriant pastures of the al luvial soils in humid climates. Second, the Downs, or middle wools, which delight in the less luxuriant herbage of the table and hill lands, particularly those of limestone forma tion. Third, the Merinos, which revel in the sweet, tender grasses of mountain heights. These breed...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

the upper portion of the rack, are framed Into th« posts. The upper cross pieces Me \\k by 8 Inches and am nailed i<> the outside of the posts. A | by 1 Inch scantling runs lengthwise in the center Of the rack and is framed to the bottom crosspieces. To this is nailed a 1 the bottom >■ 1 by 8 inch strip for the trough to rest on. Two boards, I fool wide and IV£ inches thick, placed each side of the crnter piece, make the bottoms of the Iroughs, and an outside board 1 by 8 inches, extending up 8% inches above the Boor of the trough, completes it. The slats lor the rack are 2*£ by 7-8 Inch, and are placed 2\' 2 inches apart. For outdoor use in a wet climate the rack should be rooted. This is done by nailing three pairs of rafters of the desired pitch on the top of the frame to which, on one side, one-half inch shiplap. or weather boarding, is nailed lengthwise. The other side of the roof should be attached with hinges, so it can be lifted up when feed is to be placed in the r...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

L>4 -the: S E A C M I- I © M ■ X OF" PUBLIC INVESTIGATION Has now demonstrated the fact that the SHARPLES TUBULAR SEPARATOR stands out alone in superiority. dflßSfc IjL How is it that some people still do not seem to be cognizant of this fact? Is it S^hßj Hf that the Searchlight has not developed sufficiently in their direction to thoroughly X. f^El reach them? Surely all dairymen know that the "good old bucket bowl days" have \ •'7\ L\ gone forever, and that the revolving tinshops that were in all their glory in the fSll^f""^ \/ ancient days have been superseded by the recent developments in mechanical con ifvOl^ii structions brought about and embodied in no other Separator than the Sharpies QkuriC^r^^JMlw HO The SEARCHLIGHT OF PUBLIC INVESTIGATION should now be strong irfKWm^Jv lillil I ; enough to make you resist the blandishments of the skillful agents touring the coun- IA f mnl 1 ! lilil I ! try distributing fictitious claims respecting the various CHEAP MACHINES that *ML* -...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

THE RANCH . VOL. XXII. NO. 19. Washington State Dairymen's Association AS EVERY reader of The Ranch knows, in unity of purpose and co-operation there is success to be attained for the masses. It is by the interchange of ideas and the rela tion of actual experience that men can learn many things which will prove useful to them in leading them on to success and in assisting to avoid mistakes. The dairymen of the state, who have in their make-up the ele ments of energy and a determination to attain some degree of success, real ize these truths, and to further them they have formed an association known as the Washington State Dairy men's Association. Like the Horti cultural Association and the Livestock Association, this organization aims to further the interests of all who may be engaged in the particular line of industry known as dairying. The con stitution of the organization sets forth that the objects of the association are "the encouragement of dairying by more united and intellig...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

2 PAY A LITTLE DOWN AND MOVE ON YOUR OWN RANCH < I ill' I I\\ I I kA 1 I—l M I I —I —I —I ——M —H I r sCiSri 1 i x\ ; - h^ ~H —\\i HJ r AJ/. // /T//V \~ | I JL—L^——— ' coMrtNTiM'j.siGh |H J / /// Li<«r_/Z!_//I_:QflU _3_-J§^- • /l#^oo> iTOTALAMOUNTru J>Q- |j -\ •/ /T"i r *^7/T\\T"**jr^— «Sl i***\ - Mapof ofland T2 j !' A 11l // ' "S=C^L N./ ! V^ The H.S.Connor Logged Off Lands imi,m**--~ 4— 1 / / / \V - J-— ——■'i^v "^ JL LOCATED IN coowwimmi— _| / I v-—-—i — nF^zz^v-?**^ Snohomish County streams— / U, I FLQiENtt^/)/ WASHINGTON MC6RAW&KITTEN6E* '" 1" V-fiY/ —i — 3t — h-3^ — l | ————— fs^^TSw.r*. "y i' , —\VnS^ q^ 9f vC:- 99 scale iin.-* 1 mile., z.sa-7-a-a colmanbum. -\ J^Hl Ksq§|t*f~ fU I I I I i_5U I -Sf> l 7[ 7'^ Wf^' I I / | i i?Ml^ifc^ii —Tt-it-s^^S———^ 1 1 A —3_^ _4w f// 1 -7- c —— "1 th^ "T / \^> '~7^~\P NT i il^SlS* I- I—S- Tf^lffl PSP^'iss»' N. -V - "": L • !s« • - i\ I \ — ((((& —! \ I"RZIW^? -! i j TowvsHit* 3/\?/?r/f_ L^^ommJ ltiJ-\/. 1- 1 ( 1 —I \...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 C»]man Building, Seattle. MILLER FREEMAN, Editor and Proprietor Associate Editors F WALDEN, H. L. BLANCHARD MRS. S. G. WEBSTER. Issued the First and Fifteenth of Month Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In every town to so licit subscriptions. Good commissions and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list JSSI \!r,."IS,VJSK." n» l«f e f ffl!£ ta . 1K shown on your paper by address label containing your name. paper regular wniUnt- to receive the paper regular ly you should notify the Seattle office at' once, when mistakes, if any, will be COT...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES On. of the questions in horticulture Unit serins never to be settled is tho Influence of the stork on the scion. Where root malts are used, whether whole or pit cc roots, there is doubt less very little Influence, if any. on the scion. Hut where top-working is practiced the result seems to be dif ferent. In root grafts the new tree is in a measure on its own roots but not so in top working. In fact, the best*root graft is where a long scion is used on a short piece of root. The new graft should be set so as to have but one bud above the ground. In such a case the buds on the scion below the ground will make roots and not limbs. The piece of root simply nourishes the scion till it forms its roots, and then, so far as any practical results are concerned, the piece of root may be cut off when we have a tree on its own roots. The fad about "whole root grafts" is either founded in ignorance or is worked by designing men for commercial purposes. The writer prefers a ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

strain every nerve to get ahead with these useless productions, It may bo said in excuse for this rivalry that people admire these monstrous apples. Perhaps right here is the worst evil in this business. The crowds who press around the tables covered with these great pumpkin-like apples do not know their worthlessness. Many inquire the names of these big apples and set them down in their note books with the determination that they will try to raise them and often so express themselves. I have told the people hundreds and hundreds of times that tnese apples should not be planted, except for show. One day some one asked H. E. Van Deman in my pres- Bence about the quality of the Bie tigheimer and he told him it was very poor. Some one else spoke up and said: "You would not plant more than one tree of that kind?" The reply came quick and short: "I would not do even that." I do not think that any man in the Washington building would advise people to plant these apples, except as curiosit...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. O. WEBSTER Send communications for this depart ment to Mrs. S. G. Webster, 259 Colman block. Seattle, or direct to The Ranch. All questions will be carefully answered. Contributions for publication welcome. Village Improvement Societies. One of the many interesting things at the Lewis and Clark fair is an en tertainment of moving pictures and a lecture on the establishment and growth of a large manufacturing con cern, in which it is demonstrated that taking an interest in the welfare of the employed in the long run works to the advantage of the employer. Amongst other illustrations pointing to this fact the beautifying of home surroundings plays an important part; and being in line with a subject I think of vital importance to everyone. I absorbed as many ideas as I could. It is impossible, of course, for me to tell you of the transformation made in unsightly back yards by the planting of simple vines and easily grown plants; but the thought came to me that in ma...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

»i, 1,1 ot nnce write her a letter to ?ell o? your safe arrival and to thank her aUn for the .hospitality you have received. For the Housewife. In housekeeping liberality is often the best economy, particularly at the beginning of winter when the wise expenditure of a considerable sum on the season's food supply may mean the saving Ot many a dollar. Some practical advice in this direction is given by Isabel Gordon Curtis in the October Delineator, which contains many features of housewifely interest. "Hallowe'en Party Novelties," illus trating delicacies for Hallowe'en re freshment and entertainment, is a sea sonable item, and other culinary topics are "Serving Game Dishes," "Celery Novelties," "Home-Made and Whole- Wheat Bread," and "A Rice Rounde lay." I" addition, Mary Taylor-Ross has some helpful notes on "Little Things of Housekeeping." Good Society on the Farm. Mrs. Waldo (of Boston).—l have a letter, Penelope, from your Uncle James, who wants me to spend the summer on his far...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

8 THE DAIRY Suggestions for Testing Milk. H. C. Hanson writes in the Dairy Record as follows: A few words about testing might not come wrong espec ially a.s it is the one job at the cream ery that causes much trouble and dis content among the patrons and it is sad to say that very often they have good cause for kicking in this respect. I have seen butter-makers taking the sample out of the jars containing com posite samples from one to four weeks and in examining the jars, I have found the cream sticking to the sides enough to make from *4 to 1 per cent, lower test than it should have been, had it been done right. I have seen these boys shake the jar trying to loosen the cream and mixing it, with the result of churning the milk and thus making it even more difficult to get a correct sample. Now we know that it is not likely that the same per centage of cream will adhere to each jar, and it is plain that a great in justice is done the patrons and much trouble, even to the point of br...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

FOR WHAT DO YOU BREED? In this ago Of progress, it is sur prising how few breeders of pure bred cattle are keeping records of each animal so they will will know the cows that are producing the most milk and butter fat. Men of experience must admit they cannot tell how rich milk is simply by looking at it; neith er can they measure the quantity the cow gives with their eyes. We must say there are a few men who are keep ing records of their herds, but there are still too many who are breeding their animals simply on pedigree and breed characteristics. They pay fabu lous sums for sires and purchase many expensive cows, but still think they cannot afford to spend the time for finding out just how much milk and butter fat their animals are capable of producing. It is practical to pur chase expensive cattle and breed from them when no one knows whether they are capable of producing even 200 lbs. of butter in a year? Will it not pay to spend some time to know whether your most expensive co...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1905

10 POULTRY ■ H. L. ni.AN(HAHI) Communications tor this department are solicited. Personal experiences de tailed and questions prove of great ben efit. Write to H. U Blanchard at 11. I.i lock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Se attle. Soft Food or Whole Grain. We have usually been feeding a good proportion of soft messes to our fowls, especially to the young stock. We are still giving mixed meals in the crumb ly dough state, writes T. Greiner, a practical man in his line of work. We do it because we can compound bal anced rations in the cheapest manner in this way. It is not always practi cable for us to obtain waste bones, and it is quite a task in a busy time to cut them even with a good bone cutter ar ranged for hand use. If we could get fresh bones in quantity, and have them cut with a power cutter, we would use them largely, as they make one of the very best additions to the rations for eggs or growth. Even then we might prefer to mix the fresh-cut bone with some meals, and feed ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x