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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"Go Way Bessy." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

"Go Way Bessy." A STORY FOB THE LITTLE FOLKS. I am a little girl and my name is Bossy, and I live in a little white houso with green blinds in a pretty little town where there are lot* of dear little children, with blue eyes and rosy lips. I do not go to school, because I nave an aunt Lizzio who teaches me my letters, and she takes me out to walk with her, and lets me help her weed the garden these line morning*. I I have :i brother Ralph who is a bigger boy and sometimes a naughtier boy than I wish he was. He runs away from me, and hides in the tall grass when I want to catch him, and says "little girls must not meddle" when I just want to see how heavy his kite is. He hurts my doll, too, sometimes, and when 1 orv and run to mamma, he calls me "baby" and bothers mo so. What makes boys'so cruel to little girls and their dollies, I wonder ! One day Ralph was busy in the garden playing with an old rat-trap he had found somewhere when 1 asked him to show me how it went when the rat got...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
About Boys. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

About Boys. I urn sorry to say that I don't believe all boys to be angeW, spit*' of their doting mothers. I saw, the other day, 11 poor old man, with white hair, picking his way carefully over a slippery road hardly able to hold the bundle of* rags under his arm. Ho wm tottering not with drink, but with old age. A group o! well dressed lads passed him; they then made a Large snowball, and with a shout aimed it ut his hat, knocking it into the middle of thestreet. "Shame !" I cried, M I went for it and restored it to him. He thanked me. but he had no hard or bitter -word for his little cowardly persecutors. His sorrowful look at them was enough, as he went decently on his way. 1 call the attention to this trait, because I fear the parents of boys do not sutlicirntly consider it. Now "fun" is a pood thing for boys. I don't believe in solemn boys; but it is base to triumph over and insult old age. It is base and cowardly and cruel to torture dumb animals for "fun;" I shudder when I see...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eating Raw Meat. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Eating Raw Meat. There exists a striking partiality in some countries for eating raw food. Raw fish, thinly sliced, forms a delicacy in a Chinese banquet. The Kaffirs eat alternately a slice of raw beef and one cooked. There is a peculiar variety of the salmon, which tho Kussians —especially in the extreme north —consider delicious, when eaten raw. As a general thing cold tends to favor an appetite for raw food. Frozen meat is not particularly unpalateablo to any appetite, especially if tasted in freezing weather and in the open air. Most people, who have labored in the open air, in the woods or on tho ice, in our extreme northern States, can testify to the delicious taste of a piece of thin, frozen, raw, fat pork on a slice of bread, for lunch. We havo enjoyed it with much relish, and never knew a person who did not, when invited to eat it Tinder similar circumstances. Capt. Hall's testimony is given as follows: —"My opinion is that the Esquimaux practice of eating their food raw i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Pot on the Fire. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

The Pot on the Fire. There is one mode of preparing food in general use in many parts of Europe which we should do very well more generally to adopt; that is,'gentle simmering.' In every or almost every French household there is the pot au/eu. This permament "pot on the tire," after <he manner of the old-fash-ioned "digester," occupies a quiet little corner of the stove or fireplace. It can hardly be said to boil, but it simmers on gently, very gently, for hours. There it is the receptacle of many a little bone, whether tho trimmings of poultry or butcher's meat. It matters not, every little stray fragment of wholesome meat finds its way there. A bit of liver is considered a great improvement; and any vegetables that happen to be about add to its pleasant flavor, whether the tops of celery, Jerusalem artichokes—which, par excellence, make it delicious —or otherwise carrots, turnips, leeks, etc. But supposing it were to be made altogether of fresh materials—which, indeed, ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Philosophy of Eating. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

The Philosophy of Eating. The young eat for three reasons: lfit, to groAv; 2d, to keep warm; 3d, to repair waste. Hence, all food contains one of two elements, and some kinds both, called nitrogen and carbon. The nitrogen makes flesh, sometimes called muscle, and is the same as lean meat. Carbon makes fat, and is that which keeps us warm. Sugar, starch, arrowroot, oil, butter, suet and lard have no nitrogen; there is nothing in them to make flesh out of; all tho nutriment they afford is carbon, the material for warmth. Infants and young children would get so chilly as to freeze, as it were, unless they had something sweet in their food; hence nature has implanted in them an unappeasable taste for sweet things. The thing the newborn infant needs first and always is warmth. Butter, oils and starches abound also in the heat-producing elements, but require strong powers of digestion, are applicable to grown-up persons and to the old; hence, as we grow old, we like fat meats and butter m...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Domestic Receipts. Doughnuts.—Boil one quart of new milk and melt in it half a pound of butter. Beat three eggs with two pounds of sugar, then pour on the boiling milk, stirring all the time. When nearly cold stir in a teacup of yeast, ateaspoonfnl of salt, and flour enoxigh to make a stiff batter. When quite light knead in flour enough to make a soft dough. Add a grated nutmeg and a little mace. Let it rise again until very light, roll it out, cut in strips or according to fancy, and fry in hot lard. Cream Pie.—Boil three-fourths of a cup of butter in one half pint of Avater; while boiling, stir in one and three fourths cups of flour. Take from the fire, and stir five unbeaten eggs slowly in with half a teaspoonful of dry soda. Drop on buttered pans, half the size you want when done, split and till with the following mixture: Boil one pint of milk, and while boiling, stir in three well-beaten eggs, one cup of sugar, and one-fourth cup of flour. Flavor when cold. Wine Sauce. —One an...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Mechanical Hints. To Dissolve Shellac Quickly.—White shellac may be readily dissolved in the following manner: Put the shellac with some naptha,or spirits of wine into a widemouthed bottle, and fix the bottle in a lathe. By keeping it continually but slowly revolving it will dissolve in about six hours. White shellac mixed with brown, makes a liquid glue impervious to moisture while the former alone makes a good cement for mending glass or porcelain. Black-lead Pencil Drawing, or Charcoal Drawings, may be fixed by a process which involves but little expense or trouble. Thus: Prepare a solution in moderate strength of bleached shellac in alcohol; wash over the back of the sheet of paper with this, and the drawing on the front will become fixed. In this way, as will be understood, there is no risk of smearing the lines of the drawing. To Imitate Black Walnut.—The appearance of walnut may be given to white woods, by painting or sponging them with a concentrated warm solution of permang...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LIFE THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

LIFE THOUGHTS. Indigestion and industry are two things seldom found united. An earnest man with love of children is rarely a bad teacher. Good deeds are trophies erected in the hearts of men. A just man ought to be esteemed in preference to a relation. Many a man dreads throwing away his life at once, who shrinks not from throwing it away piecemeal. Despise not little temptations; rightly met they have often nerved the character for some fiery trial. I would give nothing for that man's religion whose very dog and cat are not the better for it, says an eminent writer. A wise man is not governed by the laws and ordinances of men, but is governed by the rules of virtue. By temperance men become the most excellent, most happy, and fittest for discourse. He learns much who studies other men, he also learns more who studies himself. Loss and Unjust Gain. —Prefer loss before unjust gian; for that brings grief but once, —this forever. Said St. Simon: "If I consider myself I feel dejected; i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Things Worth Forgetting. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Things Worth Forgetting. How much wiser we would be if we could remember all the things worth remembering that occur day by day all around us. And how much better we should be if we could forget all that is worth forgetting. It is almost frightful and altogether humiliating to think how much there is in the common on-going of domestic and social life which deserves nothing but to be instantly and forever forgotten. Yet it is equally amazing how large a class avlio have no otherbusiness but to repeat and perpefoiate these very things. That is the vocation of gossips—an order of society that perpetrates more mischief than all the combined plagues of Egypt put together. Blessed in that man or woman who can let drop all the burs and thistles, instead of picking them up and fastening them on to the i^assenger. Would we let the vexing and malicious sayings die, how fast the lacerated and scandal-rid-den world would get healed and tranquilized. Forget the gossipings and bickerings, the bac...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Transcontinental Traffic. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Transcontinental Traffic. J. RICHARDS, M. E. [Written for the Pkess.] Tho interchange of the products of nature and industry from one part of the world to another, has in all ages monopolized a large share of the best talent in civilized countries. In fact, the amount of commerce of any people is a reliable exponent of their civilization. The lines of commerce and trade are, no doubt, to some extent, established by circumstances, or by laws that were not considered nor understood; and it is only in late years, and since steam transit has been known, that commerce has become a science, in the sense of being governed by laws that can in advance be ascertained, and from reliable deductions made as to its future stability and extent. History shows the influence of international trade—shows how the trade of the East has in successive ages built the great commercial centres of the world. Civilization trading with barbarism, gave the products of educated skill for gold without a regard for...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Down Stream. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Down Stream. The pleasure! and excitement of canoeing have ofton boon described. Darting hither and thither, now in the bright sunshine, ami now in the cool shades, over smooth water, across the little whirlpools, down the foaming rapids, a little touch of the vigorous arm sending the light craft hither and thither at will, past the points and shunning the rocks and snags those accustomed to the sport declare nothing more glorious. The artist, in the accompanying engraving, has sought to illustrate something of this amusement. If he has been a little liberal with the ruined walls, and witli one or two other details, we must allow it to the free use of imagination tempering recollection. Perhaps the scene may have been taken with strict adherence to facts, only our limited experience, liaving been confined to the Adirondaoks, in New York State, knows no such walls. Still the scene brings up happy memories of olden times, and may recall familiar scenes to some of our readers. There ma...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HUMOROUS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

HUMOROUS. [hnocbnck is like an umbrella—when once we have lost it we may never hope to see it. back again. Babies are coupons attached to matrimony; the interest is due at random. An old maid, speaking of marriage, says it's like ivny other disease—while there's life there's hope. Tin: sting of a bee carries conviction with it. It makes a man a bee-leaver at once. A Nr.w Invkntion \Va.nti.i>. A lady wishes some one would invent alegometer, to attach to men's pedals, so that wives may determine the distance traveled by their husbands when they want to "just step down to the poatoffloe" of an evening. A Pbovxdhhch paper talks about "animated fragments of shattered ralnbowi." The writer means ladies. A yoino lady who lias been practicing "Let Me Kiss Him for His Mother," says the more she tries it the better she likes it. A kiss, says a French authoress, gives more pleasure than anything else in the world. ChaBITABLB. A charitable Cincinnati gentleman keeps a pair of dogs ch...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Market Report. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Market Report. "JEEMS PIPES OF PIPESVILLE" Hams—-Have gone behind a quarter, probably from the fact that they were taken from the hind-quarter. Molasses. —Several traders have been stuck with this article. Boots—Have advanced fully tiro feet, and are freely "pigged oft'" at this rate. Ah we arc now at the heel of tho season our merchants will have to too the mark before shortly. Clothing. -We coat pants as a good inrc.s/ment. Hides, Horns and Tallow. —The holders of hides ire almost ready to jump out of their skins. Horns are freely taken at the saloon. Tallow has gone to Greece in large quantities. Powpkh. We have to notice a " fair" report of the going off of thin article at good rates. Dover is preferred. Potato The arrival of a largo number of emigrants from the "first gem of the sea" has caused a decided advance. In fact, not to be mealy mouthed, it appearos to our "eyes" that there must soon be a great scarcity unless the duty on foreign potatoes be re-peeled. Beets.—Scarcely ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Meteorological Observations. AT Sacramento, Oat,., BY TIIOS. M. LOGAN M. D. Permanent Secretary of State Board of Health. Lat 88°S1'41" N., Long. 181°8B'4*"W. Hißhtat,Levee above moan low tide, at San Francisco, VI feet. HiKiit 01 lower surlace of mercury, ill feet. The amount, of cloudiness ih designated by figure!, Id being entire oloudiOBM; !>, half oloualneii; o,entireclearness; and Intermediate numiiers in proportion. The force Of the wind is hlho registered in the Mime manner; 0 being a calm, I a very light breeze, and 10 v hurricane. The mean* are derived from three daily reading! at 7 a. m,, 2 i>. m., and !• p. M., in uniformity with the arrangement!) ol the Smithsonian Institute. * Tlieriiiomotograph. + Kain. Kemarkh, -Our tnlilf hliows a sudden fall in tlio liarometrio reading of tho laHt day of the Week, which is explained by thfl storm now prevailing (April IKtli, 2 P, M.), with every inilication of It! being general throughout the entire Pacific Co...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations in Tulare County. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

Meteorological Observations in Tulare County. [Reported exjireKKly for the PISM, by Isaac I!. UumForm, of Orange (irovc.J i I Ins of U ii Ther. Barometer. Hemarkn. 'b. 1 1 51 II S* 1 St 47 88 m 4) hi m 44 8tt «5 4H 67 «:j 63 71 63 80 til. «_' SI «l 57 41 lili • -i • 50 til Ii2 45 (iH tvl 51) 7U «i .V) 75 64 44 55 « 4(1 <>0 S3 4.') «7 till 50 till 62 51 83 53 « 51 45 8ft Mi «0 «2 71 76 .■Hi 62 89 311 i.l 5l< 45 65 till S3 Hit 62 58 til 57 45 ti() «1 49 ti(t 83 45 75 61 51 74 68 53 Hi I 89 50 81 81 \~& rV1'' I 5t .4. :?'i ':>' .21 .■•I .1.1 .OS Variable. I 'lcar. Clear. Fair. Pair. Variable—threat sttn. llain last night. l'air. Variable. Fair. Clear. Clear, Variable—blnitery. Fair—cool breuze. < 'lear. 7 V. *! .1 .01 i .01 Clear—very fine. Variable—blustery. Clear, Variable. Clear—ipklelait n"ht I Variable. Clear—strong wind. 'i it-.. Clear. ; K M.ar. * hiunrine. fSimset.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
San Francisco Retail Market Rates. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

San Francisco Retail Market Rates. Friday, April 21, 1871. MISCELLANEOUS. Butter, 0»l fr. ft 35 6* 40 i Wool Sacks, new 40 « 90 Pickled, Cal.tb « I Becond-hnddo 87^0 70 do Oregon, lb.. (4 | Wheat-sks, 22xlit» 13V* 14 Honey, Vft 25 (4 30 Potato (!'y Bags. 23 <■« Cheese, >ft ... 20 (4 25 | Second-hnddo 16 (si KkK«. lierdoz... 30 a 35 Deer Skins, f' ft, 15 a 22 Lard, vlb 18 « 25 Sheep sks, wl on 50 8 75 Sugar, or., 7 1h...l (HI (A Sheep Ml, plain. 12V''. '-'5 Brown.do/Mft 10 (iv 13 (>oat skins.each. 25 a «5 Beet, do, 7 V-*-1 00 ("> Plums, dried, ft. 15 (rj) 30 Sugar, Map. ft. 30 0 35 Peaches, dried, • 15 («l 30 PRODUCE. ETO. Codfish, dry.ft.6 00 @ I'M Barley, cwt 1 85 @1 90 Flour ex $ bb1..7 50 (.58 00 Beans, cwt 200 ft 300 Superfine, do. 550 06(10 Potatoes, cwt... ISO S3 00 Corn Meal 100 |h.:i 51) i«:| 51) Hay, "p, ton 18 (HI alB (10 Wheat, » 100 fta.2 75 <■< 300 Live Oak Wood.lo 00 (3112 00 Oatß, 100 1b5...2 00 '..2 10...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CITY MARKET REPORT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

CITY MARKET REPORT.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC PRODUCE AT WHOLESALE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 22 April 1871

DOMESTIC PRODUCE AT WHOLESALE. San Francisco, Thurs., A. m., April 20th. FLOUR— in moderate demand only and that for local use—very little enquiry for export has been noticed. Wo quote superfine, $G.50@G.75; extra, $7.50 @7.75. WHEAT— market still continues very dull. The uncertainty with regard to the crop and the continued high price in Liverpoot, confirms holders in their demand?. The impression is that France, Germany and Great Britain must be competing purchasers, and European rates must continue. Wheat that is selling in this market, to-day for $2.75 per sack, is worth $3.02 in Liveipool. It is estimated on good auj thority that there are now in the State 25,000 ! tons or 500,000 sacks of old wheat. Although the last years crop has fallen nearly a million and a half centals short of the year before, the aggregate money value has been greater. The Liverpool, market is still telegraphed at 12s. (id. New York rates unchanged. BARLEY— of 1,050 sacks of good feed in lots, at $1.85;...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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