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Title: Kerang New Times Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 19,116 items from Kerang New Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MURRABIT LINE. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

MURRABIT LINE. Close Rcvd Mon Fri Tue Sa Roberts-Hannah 10.30 4,30 Gonn Crossing 10.30 3.30 Gonn Station P.B. 10.30 4.30 Murrabit ... 10 30 4,30 Ross Bros. P.B. 10.30 4 30 Leura P.B. ... 10.30 4.30 Dawe's P.B. ... 10 30 4.30 Capel's Crossing 10 30 4.30 Despatched Received to from Mon Fri Mon Tues p.m. a.m Westby Park ... 3 30 11

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FEEDING FOR EGGS. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

FEEDING FOR EGGS. There are many who do not give iheir birds soft food in the morning as they consider it costs more than hard corn, and so indu es loss, but tlis idea is a mistaken one, as fowls fed once a day on meal will produce (if a good laying strain) at least 30 or 40 eggs more per bird during the year in comparison with others kept under exactly similar conditions that are fed on hard grain. It must be re membered, too, that these extra eggs are produced in the winter months with the breakfast soft .food, just at the time when eggs are most valu able. One reason why soft food in the morning is most beneficial to the fowls is that the hard corn or grain cakes a certain time to. soak into the gizzard; but the soft meal passes in to the system immediately, and the fowl is nourished at once, so that no time is lost, and the flesh or eggs are produced with less exertion than if nard corn were given. It pays better to give the soft meal once a day, viz., in the morning, and this s...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RUSSIAN FARMING. The Cereal Output. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

RUSSIAN FARMING. The Cereal Output. Fully 75 per cent. of the population of Russia finds its chief means of sub sistence in farming. The output of cereals in Russia has expanded rap idly in the last decade, owing to the. adoption of improved methods of cul tivation. During the last fifteen years the population has spent over £1,000,000 in the purchase of im proved farming implements. At the same time, the organisation of the Department of Agriculture has been extended, agricultural associations have formed experimental plots, and, as the result of all these efforts, the technical aspects of 'farming are vis ibly improving. The gain in the quantity and quality of the crops has increased the rental value of the land,

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
On the Menu. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

On the Menu. Some of the restauraits have bills of fare with the flyleaf covered' with advertisements of various business houses. A man took a seat behind7 one of them, when a waiter appeared with "What wll'you have, sir?" To the ut ter cohfusion of the waiter he leisure ly remarked: -'You may fetch me a new set of teeth in gutta-percha;....an improved sewing-machine with patent, lock stitch; a box- of -bilious pills, and a pair of No. 7 French calf-skin boots." Ift a moment the waiter replied, "We do not furnish those articles." "Then what have you got them on the bill of fare for?" retorted the cus tomer. 'What, made you quit the club, Henry?" "Reason enough, I can tell you. I worked five years to 'be elected treas urer, and then they insisted on putting in a cash register."

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EASIER TO WRITE IT. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

EASIER TO WRITE IT. Prior to the epoch-making moment when his' love triumphed over his na tive bashfulness young Askam would have maintained against any odds that the hardest thing in life was to propose to the girl you worshipped. Afterwards, however, he decided that the proposal was simply child's play compared to asking the consent of his father-in-law elect, although that estimable old gentleman was a great friend. Flushed with success with the daughter, he felt. filled with the spirit of a hundred conquerors, and reck lessly insisted upon seeing the father at once. But upon reaching the li brary the spirit of the hundred con querors .suddenly evaporated and, left him, with pale face and trembling knees and chaotic mind. "I-er--er--" he stammered in sufficiently. "Indeed!" observed the old gentle man, chuckling. "Then -you're no more than human." "Ha, ha!" gasped Mr. Askam, hys terically, pretending a hilarity he was far, far from feeling. "How is your mother?" asked the old gen...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE NEW ZEALANDER. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

THIE NEW ZEALANDER. The New Zealander is a puritan of the original stock, and he possesses most of the virtues of puritanism and all its self-complacency. He doesn't denounce the Arts, -but. secretly he deplores them; though he doesn't ob ject to an Art gallery, for that is somehow a thing every up-to-date.city is expected to have, along with a sew age system and a destructor." The New Zealander is strictly moral ac cording to the 739 Commandments is sued by the Chamber of Commerce, and he also remembers a few of those he learned at Sunday-school. He is pre-eminently a -business man, and never puts his damaged goods in the window. When he feels that his vir tue is 'burgeoning beyond his capac ity to retain it he goes to Sydney for a fortnight; then he comes back and tells his friend's how thoroughly shocked he was at the goings-on over there-though probably his greatest adventure has been an- indefinite ap pointment with a peroxided barmaid who has a husband and three children to su...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GRAND OLD DAYS. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

THE' GRAND OLD DAYS. .Mr. Sainsbury, Chief Commissioner of Police in Victoria, says that the old pushes like the Flying Angels, the Crutchies, the Emuis and the White Roses, have now. quite disappeared. The good ole days are gorn, And us as played the game is left for lorn. There was a time when Crutchies-and White Roses Would bash each other's jaws an' break their noses; When shickered blokes that staggered 'ome at night Would meet us, an' be left for dead all right; When tobbies who annoyed us on the beat. Would be 'arf-kicked to rags in every street, Their 'elmets broken an' their trous ers torn, But them ole days are gorn. The grand ole days are gorn, And modern blokes is only things of scorn. One night there was when every Bou varoo Was wild to hand out stoush to Dock ey Dreiv. He was the Flyin' Angels very best, And so we put the boot into his chest, And eight of us were lunibered when he died, But all acquitted when the case was tried. My gosh, the lies they 'eard when we was...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
She-Could Lecture Them. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

She*Could Lecture Them. Mr. Frederick Townsend Martin, whose new book, "Things I Remem ber," has caused a good deal of talk, tells a. story of a titled lady, well known in society, -with very decided opinions on certain subjects. One day she was out at lunch, and the conversation turned on the plea sures of life. Everyone present gave his or her idea of what constituted en j yment, and, at last, Lady Henry re marked in her impressive manner: "For myself, I like.dinners better than anything else!" "Dinners!"' exclaimed' her host in a tone of great surprise. "My dear Lady Henry, surely you are not a gourmet?". "Oh, no," drawled her ladyship; "I like dinners because I know I am cer tain to have a man on either side of me who can't get away!"

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What He Thought. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

What He Thought. Recently, two gentlemen, driving along in a waggonette, were smoking, when a spark falling from one of their cigars set fire to some straw at the bottom. The flames soon drove them from their seats, and, while they were busy extinguishing the fire, a country man, who had for some time been fol lowing them on horseback, alighted to assist them. "I have been watch:ng the smoke for some time," said he. "Why, then, did you not givre us no tice?" asked the travellers. "Well," responded the man, "there are so many new-fangled notions now a-days, I thought you were going by steam."

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
He Was All Right. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

He Was All Right. - A colonel of the old school had made a boast that he hadn't drunk a glass of water in twenty years. One day, as he was taking a railway journey, the train was wrecked while crossing a bridge, and plunged into the river. They pulled the colonel out with a boat-hook, and when they got him on shore one of his friends rush ed up, crying: "Colonel! Are you hurt?" "No!" he snorted. "Never swallow ed a drop."

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY POTTS WAS ANGRY. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

WHY POTTS WAS ANGRY.; John Potts, the rich sugar refiner, was fuming over his breakfast eggs. "What is the matter, John?" in. quired his wife. "Matter? Why, you know how I de test' charity subscriptions, and have all my life. To think that at my age, and vwith any experience, I should be let in for two guineas to support some charity is more than I can stand. Pass the toast. "The other day one of their repre sentatives called and left two tickets at the office for a charity ball to be given in the neighborhood. It made me wild, for the man knew perfectly well that I had a conscientious objec tion to such tomfoolery. I have al ways said that I have -worked for every penny of my money, and expect other people to do the same. Pass the rbut ter. "Everyone knows that I look upon charity balls and bazaars as advertis ing shows for hypocritical snobs. It never occurred 'to me that anyone was ignorant of the fact, even that typist. So, 'without a thought, I rang for her, handed her the tick...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM VARIOUS SOURCES. THE TANGO DANGER. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

t FROM VARIOUS SOURCES. THE TANGO DANGER. We hope this tango craze does not attack our wife. Young Mrs. Gobsa Golde, the aged banker's third help -mate, has fallen a victim to it. Wit I ness the story culled by our reporter. t Our reporter tangoes, it seems, right smart, and at the recent house r warming of George Mitzler's new Pal ace Hotel, Penn and Mrs. Gobsa Golde_ did the tango so well that they were the cynosure of all eyes. At midnight old Gobsa told his wife gruffly that it was time to go. The young lady nodded, went' quietly to i the cloakroom, took her husband's hat I and threw it in the stove. Then she returned, and said that just as soon as Gobsa had got his hat and coat and ordered the carriage around, she I would be ready to depart with him. She had seven more dances with young Penn 'before the trouble was f settled by landlord George lending Banker Golde a cap. Yes, we hope the tango craze does. not attack our good wife.-Cinnamin son "Scimitar." The married life of Mr...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THINK FOR YOURSELF. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

THINK FOR-YOURSELF. In educational matters the most im portant matter is often neglected by teaching children the thoughts-of oth ers instead of cultivating their own power to think, the necessity of which must impress itself on any thought ful person, who must realise that the thoughts, etc., of good men, ranging back 10, 15, 25, and 50 years, are not in all cases the thoughts of to-day or adaptable to the present conditions. Thus in all educational matters the one motto stands good, "Think for' yourself." -And now what do we find when we take a number of young men, who are not dependent on what is generally called education for their sustenance? If they have been 'brought up in a home where they have not been taught to think by their parents or guardians, or forced to do so by poverty, we find invariably that those people who have not been taught to 'think are deficient also in will power, and as temptations come in their way they yield to same. Some of you must know of some home ...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"MAN WANTS BUT LITTLE HERE BELOW." [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

"MAN WANTS BUT LITTLE HERE BELOW." Man wants 'but little-that is true. A little heiress bride will do; A little house-or maybe two- In church a. little cushioned pew. A little cottage at the shore Newport would do-I'd not ask ,more. A little mountain shooting lodge, -V little health to doctors dodge,. A little ocean trip each year To Europe or to some place near; A little yacht to places reach In wintel-time-like, say, Palm Beach. A little box to-opera hear, A lot of littlejewels clear; A little racing car, I ween, And just one tiny limousine. Oh, yes, indeed! Quite well I know "Man wants 'but little here below." -"Judge," New York. Cameos from the courts.-Said a prisoner at Tottenham:."It's the first time I've been here." "Well, pay 5s. entrance fee," replied the magistrate. -"Globe."

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BACK TO NATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

BACK TO NATURE. The waist line which erst was so slender, And sometimes was high and then low, Is now disappearing completely, As pictures in fashion books show. I looked for the reason and found it, And so pass it on in all haste; We have cried, all these years, "Back to nature!" And in nature,, you know, there's no waste. -Cleveland "Plain Dealer."

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COMMERCIAL. BENDIGO PRODUCE MARKET. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

COMMERCIAL. BENDIGO PRODUCE MARKET. Mesers Curnow and Thomas report: Prime factory butter, to is 2d per lb.; prime separator butter, 11d to ls .per lb.; dairy butter, 10d to lid lb.; eggs is to ls ld dozen.; cheese, new, 6d to 6.d per lb. ; semi matured, 7d to 7jd lb prime matured, 8jd to 9d per lb.; honey, 60lb. tins, to 31d per lb.; do 121b. tins, 3.d to 4d per lb.; bacon sides, 10d to lid per lb.; middles, 10d to lid per lb.; hams, 11kd to is Id per lb.; pork sausage, 7d to 9d per lb.; pigs cheeks, 21d to 3d per lb.; beeswax, is 2d to 1s 4d per lb. Poultry.-Turkey gobblers extra prime, 27a Gd to 35s per pair; medium, 18s 6d to 21s per pair ; poults 10s to 13s per pair; turkey hens, 3s to 4s per pair ; roosters, prime, 5s 6d to 6s 9d per pair; medium, to 3s 9d per pair ; pullets 3s 6d to 5s 6d per pair ; hens, 2s to 3s.. 6d per pair; chickens, is 3d to 2s 3d per pair ; ducks & ducklings 2s 6d to 6s 6d per pair; goslings, 5s 6d to 7s 6d per pair ; pigeons, 9d to 2s 6d pair ...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ORGANISER ON A FARM. ASSAULT CHARGE DISMISSED. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

ORGANISER ON A FARM. ASSAULT CHARGE DIS MISSED. -The Wagga (N.S.W.) correspond' ent of the "Argus" reports that much interest was manifested in a case be fore the Wagga Quarter Sessions, when a well.kaown district farmer, George Henry Mendham, formerly of Vic. toria, was charged on two counts with having assaulted William Felix Woods an Australian Worke:s' Uniun organ iser, on 25th November, inflicting ac tual bodily harm, and with common assault. By a liberal exercise of the right to challenge, the jury was en tirely confined to town business men, farmers and workers alike being ex cluded. Woods gave evidence that be went to accused's, hay-stack, -and asked to see Mendham, who told him that he was trespassing, and had better clear out. Witness said that he would, but wanted to see the men on the place first. Accused said, I told you to get out. Are you going I Witness said, Yes, but I would like to see the men. Accused then put his hands on wit ness's throat, and pushed him- away. ...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE TENT MISSION. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

wisuOm. THE TENT MISSION. The subject of the " Fall of Pro testantism " was the theme presented at the tent on Sunday evening. The speaker Pastor Steed, said that in order to view this subject in its light, it would be necessary once again to lookat this great time prophecy of the two thousand three hundred days or years. Seeing this a vision for the " time of the end ", what event in this world marked its fulfillment ?. Was there anything of such a nature that could be looked upon that would meet the specifications of this pro phecy ? -There was just such a movement as we see outlined in this prophecy, known as " the Great :Advent Move ment " of 1844, this work arose in various parta of the world and was forwarded by ministers of different de nominations ; in the U.S. of America it was carried forward largely under the influence of William Miller. Mourabt Brock, an English writer of those times said:-" It is not merely in Great Britian that the ex pectations of the near return of t...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MATCHES [CONTRIBUTED.] [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

M"'ATOHES. [CONTRIBUTED.] The revelations made before the In terstate Commission have been or an extraordinary nature, and it is safe to predict that the manufacturers will in future not be so eager to apply for more State assistance. The match industry has at present duties in its favor ranging from 50 per cent on British to over 109 per cent on foreign made matches ' Nut content with this too liberal treatment, they have for some time been cla-oring for bigger powers to privately tax the peo ple. statements have been made and reiterated that owing to the heavy im portation of matches one of the fac tories had to close up. '1he evidence given before the Commission, however, has brought out the very interesting fact that the Victorian manufacturers were under bond to the English and foreign manufacturers to make room each year i. the Australiai market for som,- thousands of cases, each contain ing fifty gross (f noxes. As an alterna tive to taking these cases the Victorian factory h...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KITCHEN WRINKLES. [Newspaper Article] — Kerang New Times — 20 March 1914

1 KITCHEN WRINKLES. When cleaning knives damp them ibefore rubbing on the boards; -this will produce a better polish and they will clean ;much quicker. To impart a delicate odor to linen, saturate a piece of cotton or blotting paper vwi'th..oil of lavender and place it among the various articles. A little tbag of sulphur suspended in a bird-cage is not only healthy for the bird, but keeps away the parasites with which some birds are infested. -If wood worms are in old furniture rub constantly with turpentine. The polish made of turpentine and 'bees-' wax is to be preferred to any other for this cure. When boiling a haddock fasten the head to the 'tail, add only sufficient water to cover,' and "boil slowly till cooked. Haddock is hard 'and indi gestible if boiled fast. Old nail holes in wood may 'be filled. up by mixing sawdust with glue till it is the consistency of stiff paste. Pess this compound into the holes, and it will become as hard as the wood it self. When jars and jugs hav...

Publication Title: Kerang New Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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