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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FOR YOUNG FOLKS. JUVENILE DIPLOMACY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

Igl pOR YOUNG FOLKS, j 0VKNI mT nTl^OMTvOY. , I i'1" liul° «*-y°ar t- "l>;"1;' you know what 1 < ( 01,1 ""l 'to iiiv >'<•« '"r •VIH"' l,irlll<l|fr ■■■.' a'" nJ.j," «No <lear," »n»wor ^rJuVfalhoi-, "I.ut plonoo loll . ..\ nin\ HOW china .shavmg i "" 'jd, ,r„ui flowom on it all ,1 " sni.r Uh> littlo maul. "Hut, Inr" l'1" IK1ront' "l i # niw "i"-' lilt0 tlmt :llroudy'" * vim iMVi'ii't." nlio uusworod, V4 i'£'SUtfu».v. I've dropped >f.'j it."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(All RIGHTS RESERVERD.) OUR STORYETTES. THE COMEDY OF THE GOAT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

(All Riaiita Rvssqtbd.) OUR STOKYETTES. THE COMEDY OF THE COAT. Jack Fairleigh had been married just a week. His brief honeymoon at an end, the first morning' back at the office had dragged through its tedious length, and he was now finishing his chop in his favourite City restaurant. He got up and reached out for his coat, which was hanging on its cus tomary peg at his elbow. To his astonishment, ns'-'he was in the act of thrusting his arm into tlu: sleeve it was jerked roughly nearly out of his grasp. "Let that coat alone, will you!" an irate voice was exclaiming. "What : are you doing? That'B my coat!" Jack glanced sharply round at the speaker, an elderly, wiry, exceedingly angry-looking man, at an adjoining table, and back at the coat stretched between them. "I beg your pamon!" he said, giving the garment a decisive tug. "That's my coat- Xindlv take your hands off." "Your coat be dashed !" roared the man. "I've just hung it up there. What d'you mean?" What I mean is that it's my...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DOLLY'S FLIRTATION. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

DOLLY'S FLIRTATION. Dolly Ethoridgo liad beon ronowiiod as a flirt sinco tho day sho had cast off pinafores. It was hardly her owu fault. As hor guardian and godmother, old Lady Farnhatn, used to remark: "Tho nion do their host to turn the child's lvead, and their only grievance is that she accepts the attentions of them all, without proforonco." Dolly's sistor, Margaret, though hy no means a plain girl, takon by herself, wae wofully eclipsed by brilliant at tractions and slightly assertive person ality of her younger sister. It was well known, too, that Lady Farnham, though* sho had practically adopted both tho orphan girls, intended to leavo tho bulk of her fortuno to hor godchild, Dolly, Margaret being no groat favorito with tho worldly old woman who pronounced hor "high-not ioned and dowdy." As may bo imagined, Margaret's masculine admirers had, up to now, beon but fow. Ono or two had hovered near hor, struck by a cor tain indescrih abo sweetness of expression, and tho suggestio...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMERICAN HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

AMERICAN HUMOUtt. Novor Evon Topicl. -' Uavo you hoi ivatw i/j your hou.so.v" Have l."1 My dear boy, I am nov or oiu of it." * * * • # Dolfoato Hint.—BalJadi.sfc; "Don't }ou thi/ik ii 1M cut out olio of my four songs it would improve my act?" Stage Manager: "Yes, about twenty iivo pur cent." * * * * # Sortie Rotort.—"You aro getting very bald, sir," said tho Ijarljtir. • "You, yourself," retorted tlio cus tomer, "aru not freo from a number of defects that I could mention if J cured to become personal." Hop Reward. — Goodfollow ivitU nowsp;i[ior): "Here's nn old bachc}o? in Ohio died and left all his money to tho woman who rejected him." Cyiiieus: "And yet they say tiler© is no gratitude in tho world/' Silence.—"Once a friend of mine and I agreed that it would be helpful for each of us to tell the other his faults." "How did it work?" "We haven't spoken for nine years."—"Chicago Record Herald." • * « » » Good Business Mrs. Itich: "Why do you pay your maid sueh awfully high wagesp" Mr...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(All [?] R[?].) COMPLETE STORY THE WOMAN WITH THE PLAIN FACE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

(All fiiasYi BuitvKo.) COMPLETE STORY THE WOMAN WITH THF. PLAIN FACE. By RUBY M. AY RES. Author of "Castles in Spain,'' "The Right Sort of Love," "The Master of the Chase,'' "Out ot the No-' where," "The Parsing of the Shad ow,M etc. The woman with the plain face sat mechanically hammering the keys of a typewriter, and glancing UP now aIU' then across the room in the direction of a partially open door, through which she could see a man sitting at a table writing letters. At least, he was supposed to be ■ writing letters. There was paper be fore him, and a pun in his haiuf; but the woman with the plain face knew that the paper was innocent of writing save for the date, and that the ink on the pen was long since dry. Every time the bell on the type writer clfcked at the end of a line she glanced up at him; and all the time she was mechanically copying from the shorthand notes at her elbow she thought about htm; and, as she spent her life copying shorthand notes, she was always thinkin...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AT THE SEASIDE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

AT THE SEASIDE. Tiio lady bather liad got out of her depth-, and she couldn't swim. Nor could the young man at the end of the pier, but when she came up for the first tiuio and ho caught sight of her faco, he shouted: "Help!" A burly fisherman sauntered up to his side. "Wot's up?" lie hoarsely cried. "Sly wifo is drowning. I can't swim I Twenty quid for you if you can save her." In a moment the fisherman was in tlio sea. In another minufc he was out of it with tho rescued lady bather. Swelling- with expectation, ho came up to the young inau again. "Well, what about tlio twenty quid?" ho asked. But if the young man's faco had been ashen ^jtv before it was now deadly pale, as he gazed upon the f..ilarcs of tho recovering dame. ■'Y-e-s, I know," ho gasped, "bub wlion X made the offer I thought it was my wifo who was drowning, and now —now it turns out it was my wife's mother." Tho fisherman pulled a very long faco. "Just my luck," ho muttered. Thrusting his hands into his pockets, "How...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
UP-TO-DATE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

UP-TO-DAT"E. A lady was Riving a Scripture lesson on tho subjccfc of tho prophet Elisha. and tho wicked children* who reviled him. She described bow the aged pro phet was foeblv making his way uphill whon tho children en mo about him, jeered and ridiculed him, and called out, "Go up, thou bald head!" She then proceeded to impress upon tho class the duty of being kind, consider nto^ and rospectful to elderly people. "I hope," she said, "if any of you had been there you would not have boon so rude and unmannerly." "No. mum." decisively responded an itivhin in front. "And what would you have dono?" asked the lady. "T should havo walked up to him kindly, mum, an* said as I 'opod 'o 'ad got 'is old-age pension." A man is more apt to dio of broken vauity than of a broken heart.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO POLISH SHELLS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

&?{ UOW TO J'OUSll SHELLS. vf1 \ I Tliero "" iLiiiuKomont on a not <I"X ilt l'10 smls'd° mounting 0„,| polishing (l.o sholls you liavo gath ertxl on B'"' °"os- Sliolls look niiicli prutti'.'i' wliuu they are polishod, „],1 thdir colours bocomo brightor. flio polisfiinK is quite ffl'mplo. All you tivo (odd i» to rub tlio sliolls with poiy <|mm1 ptiinii'o-stoiio, anil, when thoy m. [jolislKXl xiiflioiontl.v, io finish t.lioii) Off by riibl'ini; witli a soft rag dippod in nil. IVIiMl's may bo poliahod in tlio smio way. If yuu mint lo nso your polished jiolls to deniruto lioxos or frumps', a phxl wisluir for slidcing thoiu is made liv dissolving somo shoot golatino in jn ft will or to mako a thick svnip. If i< lit! In plaster of Paris is tin* pjisl-o "'ill bo strongor, but tins is not iii'Milutoly necossary.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A YOUNG TURK'S DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

A YOUNG TURK'S DAY. I A Turkish boy's first day at school is preceded by an imposing coromoriy. When ho awakes in the morning his hands are stained with henna, and ho is dressed in clothes that ho has not worn before. His small dark head is « ilivoratcd with jowols, and ho is pro $ seated with a brand-now bag, in which £ lie carries a copy of tho sacred Koran, jjl Accompanied by his father, ho sets cut 'i for school, and on his arrival is asked 3 to recite tho Moslem creed. This dono, £ he kisses the master's hand and joins ? the class. jt Ho learns his lessons chiefly by roto, | kneeling with his schoolfellows in a s long row, und swaying his body from ] side to sido as he sing-songs out his > task. Tho hod] a—headmaster—sits jj with his legs crossed on tho floor on I a bright-huod rug, with his assistant | beside him. |[ Religion is the principal subject ! taught in i ho moktob, and no trilling is permit-ted. If a schoolboy is lazy or disobedient, ho is either beaten or severel...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THREE LITTLE PUZZLERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

if Tint KB MTTLE PUZZLERS. Tl-cso iii'o all vory oasy quostions, i..ii siill it is simplo to trip a ]>or ...m up mi them if ho doesn't atop to 1 k. 1 How ninny blocks a quarter of inch hjilu'o would you nocd to fill a bus an inch squaro? Somo pooplo ivill say only four, othore will think twice and sny 1G, and a fow will roaliso that it will tako C-l. '2. If yon cut somo equilateral tri angles all of the samo sizo out of paper —tliat is triangles whoso throo sidos aro all equal—how many suolv triangles can you plaoo around one of those tri angles so as to touch itP You will fiavo to '0' Mfi'8s 'cad try sidos a number of times boforo you can answer this. You will find that 12 is tho number. 3. If you havo a number of cubical blocks, how many of thorn can you ar rango so that tlioy will all touch at tho samo point? Many will havo an idea that four is all that can bo ID ado to touch, but tho right answer is oight.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MAGNET IN SURGERY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

THE MAGNET IN SURGERY. Doctor Garel, of Lyons, has drawn, a French nail-about two inches long from the bronchial tube of a boy of eighteen months from Buenos Ayres. The nail had been there for some time, causing the child to cough much. Rontgcn rays showed the position of it, and an electro-magnet drew it out. Another successful operation, of a similar kind has been performed by Doctor Picchaud, of Bordeaux, on a child of three years, In this case the trachea was opened to get a projection from the pole of the magnet near the nail.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BEARD. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

THE BEARD. It is recorded that the reign of Henry the Fourth of France was the golden age of beards, for at that time (luitc as much attention was paid to them as to the dressing of the hair of both sexes. Beards were clipped in all ' manner of fashions—round, square, pointed, fan-shaped, and after the fashion of an artichoke leaf. Unfortu nately, . when the craze for beards, of all shapes and sizes was at its height,/ Louis the Thirteenth, who was then a child, came to the throne, and the beard had to go in honour of the hair less chin of the new monarch. Soon afterwards the tuft came into vogue. v

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PLUMBAGO MINES IN CEYLON. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

PLUMBAGO MINES IN CEYLON. Plumbago, Ceylon's most important • mineral product, is known all over the world for its lustre, lubricating, polishing:,!and binding- qualities. In appearance it is a strong' black crystal line. There are now about one thou sand plumbago mines in Ceylon, in cluding" a!) the shallow pits, open works, and deep mines. The depth varies from a few yards to as much as seven hundred feet. Most of the mines are worked by natives, the only .im portant one controlled bv Europeans being the Mcdapola. At the majority of the mines the only machinery used J is the "dabare." This consists of a long wooden barrel with handles at each end. Round this a rope is given t.wo or three turns,*and a bucket is fas tened to each end. It is worked by I seven or eight men turning the handle. !

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL DIAMONDS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFI CIAL DIAMONDS. The late Professor Moissan succeed ed in producing small artificial dia monds, but his method was diffi cult in application,' and save no prospect of manufacturing large stones of commercial va lue. Recently, however, M. de Bois menu, of Paris, has succeeded in pro ducing carbon crystals, i.e., diamonds one-tenth of an inch long, by the elec trolysis of melted calcium 'carbide. With a refractory furnace, carbon elec trodes six or seven inches in diameter are embedded in fragments of calcium carbide surrounded by a mixture of lime and carbon. After striking the arc the carbons are gradually drawn ten inches apart, and a current of seven or eight hundred amperes is passed, for six to twelve hours or more.' At the end of this time "a black coke like mass surrounds the negative car bon and contains a number of diamond crystals. So far as the,-tests have pro ceeded, it apf&ars that these crystals grow at the rate of one-one-hundredth of an...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CATE FASTENERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

CATE FASTENERS. Buttons on. gates or small doors are apt to become loose and then drop down,'thereby allowing the gate or door to become unfastened. The ordinary button is shown at A, whore it is looso and turned by its own woigkt". If a button is cut as shown in B,-it will romain fastened, evon if it is looso on the screw or nail.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHE SHUFFLED, HE CUT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

SHE SHUFFLED, HE OUT. At a country ball a fanner had en gaged a pretty coquotte for the next dance; but a gallant captain coming along, persuaded the young lady to can cel Ivor previous engagement in favor of himself. The farmer, overhearing tho conversation, wont to a card-table and sat down to a game of whist. A few minutes later tho captain stepped up to tho young lady to ox cuso himself, as he had forgotten that ho was alroady engaged to another. Miss Coquotto, much chagrined, then made tracks for tho whist-table, hoping to secure her first partner. Nodding to tho farmer, and with her fnco covered with smiles, she sweotly said:— "I think, eir, that it is time to take our places." Tho old farmor, in tho act of dividing tho pack for tho next dealer, courteous ly replied:— "No, Miss S ; I mean to keep my present-*place. When ladios shufflo, I cut."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN GOVERNMENT SERVICE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

in government service. A certain old colonel was noted for his groat generosity. Ho had lost an arm during ono of tho engagements in which ho had seen service, and this inado him very sympathetic towards nil who had experienced similar losses. Whilo walking on his estate ono day ho mot an old one-logged man, evident ly in abject poverty. "Ah, you have indSwith a groat mis fortune, like myself, I soo," remarked tlio colonel. "All," replied the old man, and, liko yersei', colonel, I havo spout a great part o' my lifo in Government service, and scon a lot o' hard work." "My poor man !' exclaimed tho kind hearted colonel, as lie pushed a half crown into the old man's hand, "I fear you havo received but a poor reward for your services." "Yo may well say that, colonel," ro pfied the veteran, as ho hobbled away. "Hut," added tho colonel, "you didn't tell mo wliero you served." "Well, if it comes to that," th-o old reprobate answered, with a sly ehucklo, "T served my time in j-jail. where t...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. POWER OF AIR-BRAKES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. L'OWKR 01' AIH-MUKE9. Some idea of tlio power of an air broiik may bo gained from the follow ing facts: lb takes a powerful loco motivo drawing u train of ten pa.sseng or cars a'di.stanco of about fivo mile,. !to roach a speed of nixty miles per hour on a straight and lovol track. Tho brakes will stop tho samo train from a speed of sixty miles por hour in 700 foot, lloughly, it may bo fitatod that a train may ho .stopped by tho brakes in about 3 por rent, of tho dis tance that must be covered to giv© it its speed.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LOSSENING GLASS STOPPERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

loosening glass stoppers. You have seen people try all sorts of trick's to get the glass stopper out of a bottle. Sometimes they will try to pry it loose with a shoe-horn or a pair of scissors, or they will hit it against the edge of the mantelpiece, and in many cases they will crack the bottle before they can loosen the stopper. The thins" that makes the stopper stick is that the neck of the bottle is too tight, and if a bottle filled with anything warm has a cold stopper put in it, there is sure to be trouble get ting that stopper out again. The way to get the' stopper out is to make the neck of the bottle larger, and the smallest fraction of a:> inch will do— so small that no human eye could sec it. Glass responds very quickly under the action of heat or cold, which is why a sudden change of temperature will crack a glass dish so easily. T!ut if you'want to make the neck of a bottle expand just enough to loosen a stop per, moderate heat quickly applied is the thing. The trick ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THOUGHTS ON MEN AND WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 7 March 1914

THOUGHTS ON MEN AND WOMEN. Keep ns young as you can, us long us you can. That is tho only secret worth knowing. A man never falls in love with tho woman he studies, but with tho woman wJio studies him. It is very admirable to pussottb au ai'ti.stie soul,* but it pays bettor to have artistic lingers. •If you can't ho with what you want to bo with most, you must enjoy what you can bo most with. Tho difference between a man and a woman is that a man looks forward, and a woman remembers. If Nordan is right, genius is rc great affliction; and if Darwin is right—well, no wonder wo all liko nuts. Convineo tho world that you can do without it, and you will soem so won derful that it will clamour for you. Tho whole art of giving dinners, next to, food, is to know how to pair. A man cares for what ho oats, a woman euros what she sits next. Society will not thank you for feeding it, or for instruction ; hut if you can in vent for it a. new folly, you will be given its "Open Sesame." Tho differ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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