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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

The Indian Advocate. 248 AH it does is to impress the fitness of retribution on a soul which intends to escape all retribution; it is a monition, not a sentence, not a judgment; it is the completion of the Divine Synthesis of Catholic faith. And now we touch Confirma tion, or the gifts of the Holy Spirit; a Sacrament which pre supposes a more soldierly heat of warfare between the two natures (as we have called them) of the earnest Catholic. "Two. natures" is an expression which theologically is not accurate, but it serves roughly to convey a plain meaning. Now consider the consequences of this fourth Sacrament. A man's ,soul and body become the temple of the Holy Spirit, as they have already become the temple of the Son of God; and. thus the union with the Divine Trinity is completed completed for time and for eternity. Yet we have to take this awful truth in connection with the collateral .truth that mast men sin mortally even after Confirmation. Thus most men incur wounds and scar...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

""PiPrnFfS'" 249 The Indian Advocate. sense") as well as a reason in the Catholic faith; an instinct of the divine fitness of the whole ideal; and the other three Sacraments (to which we have not yet alluded) Holy Order, Extreme Unction, and Matrimony are parts of the whole of the perfect Ideal of Catholic truth. Holy Order presupposes a supernatural ministration, which is absolutely necessary to aid the soul in a life-long struggle; and therefore it presup poses reward or punishment at the close of life, which our faithfulness or our unfaithfulness may have merited. To im agine the necessity of so sublime an office as that of Priest hood, involving as it does such wondrous gifts and powers, and graced as it is with capacities of union with the human soul, such as laymen can profoundly reverence but cannot possess, is to realize that there must be fearful dangers ahead, which So supernatural an office can alone cope with, by Sac rifice, by Absolution, by Benediction, by all the mult...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

The Indian Advocate. 250 by dwelling on the Divine Mercy, or of the Crucifixion by dwelling on the Immaculate Conception. We do not wonder that Protestants cannot undei stand Purgatory, because they are forced to regard it only as one of the bits of their splintered faith one of the disjecta membra of the mutilated, body of their heresy; they are accustomed to a purely human judgment upon all doctrine, and therefore each doctrine is to them isolated or by itself. Precisely as their shadowy ideas of the Incarnation render devotion to the Blessed Virgin a mere sentiment, so their fragmentary con ception of Catholic Unity renders the integralness of each dogma a mere dream. Reality cannot exist outside the Cath olic faith, because outside it there is no wholeness of perfect parts. To Catholics such truisms need no insistance. But to non-Catholics it should at least be a rational question: How comes it that that which must be Whole because Divine has, for them, no single Part which is n...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

251 The Indian Auvocatk. i i! LOCALS 1 $ it Rev. Father Meinrad Fisher, O. S. B., of Norman, Okla., visited us for a few days the past month. The first installment of the peach crop at the Mission has had its day and disappeared. We await expectantly the coming of No. 2. Reverend Mother Katherine, Superioress of the Sisters of Mercy, spent some time at the Mission during the past month looking after the con struction of their new academy. Rev. Father Vincent is staying temporarily at Langston, Okla., during the absence of Rev. Father Ildefonse, who is spending a few weeks here at the Mission recuperating his health. Our new Indian School building will be nearly or quite finished by the time this number is ready for mailing. A competent force of skilled workmen are putting on the finishing touches. July iGth, Mr. William Deisterand Miss Alice Monnot were united in the bonds of matrimony by the Rev. Father Blaise, Pastor of Sacred Heart. We wish the young couple a long and happy wedde...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

Tub Indian AnvoCA-rr.. 252 Z$ ural infirmities, together with the excessive heat now prevailing, we fear for his safety. Father Adalbert is one of the pioneers of Sacred Heart Mission, having been with the mission almost from its first inception, and the prayers and good wishes of his colleagues are with him in this, his hour of trouble, and it is the wish of the community that he may be spared and restored to us in bodily health and vigor. Before this number of the Advocate reaches our readers enough claimants for homes in the new country will have registered their names to take up every available quarter section and leave a large over-flow on the outside. By proclamation of the President the Wichita, Kiowa, Comanche and Apache reservation will be opened for settlement on August 6, igoi. There will be no mad rushes and wild scrambling and other scenes of dis order which have marked previous openings. This time the possession of homesteads will be determined by drawing. By the terms...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1901

'Si 253 The Indian Advocate. the "old mill shed" and the hungry audience fell to with right good-will in the work of "reducihg the surplus" of provender so abundantly supplied. Dinner being disposed of and the "wreckage" cleared away, the Indians, with well-stuffed diaphragms, were disposed to talk "business," and the meeting was called to order and a chairman, or interpreter, was selected, the object of the meeting was stated, and the various participants were called upon to "air" their views and express their opinions. The proceed ings took on more of an informal than a formal character, and everyone was allowed to have his "spiel." It seemed to be the general wish of the speak ers that a new home be acquired in Mexico or in some other part of the United States, and in furtherance of that object a committee was appointed, consisting of Messrs. Paul Toupin, Baptiste Pambogo and J. L. Higbee, to open a correspondence with the Mexican representative at Washington and y with the Secre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate Vol. XIII. SEPTEMBER, 1991. No. 9 SJ , GOD KNOWETH BEST. r ) The world is as we find it, Whether (or ill or good; The path is oft-times stony, Leads oft-times up the hill; But when we reach the summit, And find there peace and rest, We then forget the journey And feel God knoweth best. The world is as we take it, , Whether for good or ill; The path lies through the brambles, And often through the wood; Rut if w Innlf hnvnnrl it w Where shines the light of day, , . vvcti uiavci juuiuc uuwaiu, "God knoweth best" we say. The world is as we make it; We reap both good and ill; s The seed we sow in passing Up-springs from wood and hill; Before we reach the summit The flowers may be but weeds, Unless we tread with gladness God's path He knows our needs.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

255 The Indian Advocate. - I j THE NAVAHO RESERVATION. H Habits; of the People BY COSMOS MINDBLEFP. ' Continued from the August Number. ' ' The habits of a people, which are to a certain extent the product of the country in which they live, in turn have a pro nounced effect on their habitations, tyew Mexico and Arizona came into the possession of the United States in 1846, and prior to that time the Navaho lived chiefly by war and plun der. The Mexican settlers along the Rio Grande and the Pueblo Indians of the same region were the principal con tributors to their welfare, and the thousands of sheep and horses which were stolen from these people formed the nucleus or starting point of the large flocks and herds which consti tute the wealth of the Navaho to-day. The Navaho reservation is better suited for the raising of sheep than anything else, and the step from the life of a war rior and hunter to that of a shepherd is not a long one, nor a hard one to take. Under the stress of nec...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 256 about the borders by some Navaho whose thrift was more highly developed than his honesty. The condition of the tribe, as a whole, is not only far removed from hardship, but may even be said to be one of comparative affluence. Owing to the scarcity of grass over most of the country, and the difficulty of procuring a sufficient supply of water, the flocks must be moved from place to place at quite frequent intervals. This condition, more than any other, has worked against the erection of permanent houses. Yet the Navaho are by no means nomads, and the region within which a given family moves back and forth is extremely circumscribed. In a general way the movements of a family are regu lated by the condition of the grass and the supply of water. In a dry season many of the small springs cease to flow at an early date in the summer. Moreover, if a flock is kept too long in one locality, the grass is almost destroyed by close cropping, forcing the abandonment of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

257 The Indian Advocate. nication very difficult and at times impossible. In a few favored localities usually small, well-sheltered valleys here and there in the mountains some families may remain throughout the winter, but as a rule, at the first approach of the cold season and before the first snow flies, there is a general exodus to the low-lying valleys and the low mesa regions, and the moun tains are practically abandoned for a time. During the rainy season pools and little lakes of water are formed all over the flat country, lasting sometimes several weeks. Advantage is taken of the opportunity thus afforded and the flocks are driven out on the plains and grazed in the vicinity of the water so long as the supply holds out, but as this is seldom prolonged more than a few weeks it is not sur prising that the house erected by the head of the family should be of a very temporary nature. In fact the most finished house structures of these people must be temporary rather than perman...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 258 the bottoms. The conditions here are exceptionally favorable for horticulture; indeed, the numerous remains of cliff dwell ings which are found in the canyon would show this if other evidence were lacking. It has long been famous among the Navaho as the horticultural center of the tribe, and for its peach crops, derived from thousands of trees planted in shel tered nooks. In the summer scattered members of the va rious families or clans gather there by hundreds from every part of the reservation to feast together for a week or two on green corn, melons and peaches. As a rule, however, each hogan stands by itself, and it is usually hidden away so effectually that the traveler who is not familiar with the customs of the people might journey for days and not see half a dozen of them. The spot chosen for a dwelling place ''s either some sheltered nook in a mesa or a southward slope on the edge of a pinon grove near a good fuel supply and not too far from water. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

259 Thk Indian Advocate. from the time when the Navaho were warriors and plunderers, and lived in momentary expectation of reprisals on the part of their victims. Although the average Navaho family may be said to be in almost constant movement, they are not at all nomads, yet the term has frequently been applied to them. Each family moves back and forth within a certain circumscribed area, and the smallness of this area is one of the most remarkable things in Navaho life. Ninety per cent of the Navaho one meets on the reserva tion are mounted and usually riding at a gallop, apparently bent on some important business at a far-distant point. But a closer acquaintance will develop the fact that there are many grown men in the tribe who are entirely ignorant of the coun try 30 or 40 miles from where they were born. It is an excep tional Navaho who knows the country well 60 miles about his birthplace, or the place where he may be living, usually the same thing. It is doubtful whether the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian AIiVocatk. 260 The qasciti, as the head of the family is called, drives the po nies and cattle, the former a degenerate lot of little beasts not much larger than an ass, but capable of carrying a man in an emergency 100 miles in a day. He carries his arms, for the coyotes trouble the sheep at night, two or three blankets, and a buckskin on his saddle, but nothing more. It is his special duty to keep the ponies moving and in the .trail. Following him comes a flock of sheep and goats, bleating and nibbling at the bushes and grass as they slowly trot along, urged by the dust-begrimed squaw and her children. Several of the more tractable ponies carry packs of household effects stuffed into buckskin and cotton bags or wrapped in blankets, a little corn for food, the rude blanket loom of the woman, baskets, and wicker bottles, and perhaps a scion of the house, too young to walk, perched on top of all. Such a caravan is always accompanied by several dogs curs of unknown breed, b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

?6i The Indian Advocate. In early times, when the organization of the people into clans was more clearly denned, a section of territory was par celed out and held as a clan ground, and some of the existing clans took their names from such localities. Legends are still current among the old men of these early days before the in troduction of sheep and goats and horses . by the Spaniards, when the people lived by the chase and on wild fruits, grass seeds and pinon nuts, and such supplies as they could plun der from their neighbors. Indian corn or maize was appa rently known from the earliest time, but so long as plunder and the supply of game continued sufficient, little effort was made to grow it. Lnter, as the tribe increased and game be came scarcer, the cultivation of corn increased, but until ten years ago more grain was obtained in trade from the Pueblos than was grown in the Navaho country. There are now no defined boundaries to the ancient clan lands, but they are still recogn...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

Thk Indian Advocatk. 262 authority chiefs by courtesy, as it were. Ever since we have known them, now some three hundred years, they have been hunters, warriors and robbers. When hunting, war and rob bery ceased to supply them with the necessaries of life they naturally became a pastoral people, for the flocks and the pas ture lands were already at hand. It is only within the last few years that they have shown indication of developing into an agricultural people. "With their previous habits only tempo rary habitations were possible, and when they became a pas toral people the same habitations served their purpose better than any other. The hogaris of ten or fifteen years ago, and to a certain extent the hogans of today, are practically the same as they were three hundred years ago. There has been no rea son for a change, and consequently no change has been made. On the other hand, the Hopi came into the country with a comparatively elaborate system of house structures, previously d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

263 The Indian Advocate. dentally they are increasing their flocks and herds. On the other hand, under the stress of modern conditions, the Navaho are surely, although very slowly, turning to agriculture, and apparently show some disposition to form small communities. Their flocks of sheep and goats have decreased materially in the last few years, a decrease due largely to the removal of the duty on wool and the consequent low price they obtained from the traders for this staple article of their trade. In both cases the result, so far as the house structures are concerned, is the same. The houses of the people, the homes "we have always had," as they put it, are rapidly disappearing, and the exam ples left today are more or less influenced by ideas derived from the whites. Among the Navaho such contact has been very slight, but it has been sufficient to introduce new methods of construction, and in fact new structures, and it is doubtful whether the process and the ritual later desc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 264 little stick of wood from a tcindi hogan is used about a camp fire, as is sometimes done by irreverent whites, not an Indian will approach the fire; and not even under the greatest neces sity would they partake of the food prepared by its aid. This custom has had much to do with the temporary character of the Navaho houses, for men are born to die, and they must die somewhere. There are thousands of these tcindi hogans scat tered over the reservation, not always recognizable as such by whites, but the Navaho is unerring in identifying them. He was not inclined to build a fine house when he might have to abandon it at any time, although in the modern houses alluded to above he has overcome this difficulty in a very simple and direct way. When a person is about to die in one of the stone 01 log houses referred to he is carried outside and allowed to die in the open air. The house is thus preserved. 7o bf Continued. J& j 08 FATE OF THE MAN WHO DISREGARDED T...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

265 The Indian Advocate. ! THE SCHOOL LIFE OF INDIANS, f I William R. Draper 1. It was late summer when the teachers on the Indian reser vation decided that the fall term should commence. They had called an extra meeting, and some of them viewed with alarm the frequency of the ghost dance. It was feared that all of the teachings of the last year would be destroyed in a few weeks, should the young men take to dancing again. I went with the superintendent when he rode among the rows of tepees in the Indian village, informing the children that school would com mence on the following Monday, and telling them to prepare for the annual contest. The superintendent had introduced a plan, which was unique but successful. He gave, to the young man appearing neatest at the opening of school, a fine suit of baseball clothes. To the girl winning the correspond ing prize, he presented a toilet set. I noted the frown that passed over the dark faces of the old men when this announcement was made in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

The Indian Advocate. 266 It is interesting to visit the Indian school of to-day and compare it with that of five years ago. There is such a marked improvement, one can hardly recognize the schoolroom as that of other days. On the walls hang pictures neatly framed, as examples of the taste of the young Indians. On the black board one sees well-drawn figures, showing how art is im proving. The quick manner in which all questions are an swered, the close attention to schoolroom rules, and the ex cellent deportment, tell the story of careful discipline. The school system of to-day prepares the young Indian for a place among his educated white brothers, while a few years ago it was only intended to drag him out of his wild life and place him in line with the cowboy or frontiersman. The course of instruction is limited, but the industrial training for boys include shoe and harness making, tailoring, blacksmith ing, masonry work, plastering and brick making and laying. The girls are taught...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1901

267 The Indian Advocate. -4-"" ..- - I MISSIONS IN THE INDIAN TERRITORY. ' - ATOTvA. The little church of St. Patrick, at Atoka, I. T. (size 20x30), is the first church ever built within the limits of the two (Indian and Oklahoma) Territories. Previous to the erection of the Prefecture of the Indian Territory, in A. D. 1876, the Rev. Jesuit Fathers of the Osage Mission, Kansas, and Rev. Father Michael Smythe, of Fort Smith, Ark., vis ited occasionally the first Catholic settlers of Atoka and sur rounding country. In the year 1873, when the Missouri, Kansas & 'Texas Railroad was being built, quite a number of Catholic laborers located in Atoka. Under the direction of the above-men- . tioned missionaries they undertook to put up a place of wor ship. When, in the following year, the new Prefect Apos tolic, Rt. Rev. Isidore Robot, came to take charge of his field, he found a simple box house, unfinished inside, even . part of the lumber unpaid. The first work of the Prefect and. Bro...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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