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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1905

COMMISSION ROW TALK Tn regard to fruits, the general tone of the market has held up through the entire season in a way that it has not for several years past, Ryan & New ton claim that the market for all kinds of fruit has been unusually firm and that there have been practically no gluts on any varieties. The grow ers they claim, have shown better judgment this year in marketing their produce, and this has contributed in no small degree in keeping the mar kets in as good condition as they have been This tendency on the part of the fruit raisers is extremely encour aging to the commission men, who claim that poor judgment in shipping and in the time of trying to market the goods has caused themselves and the growers considerable trouble in the past and has tended to reduce profits for both. This year the grow ers have seemed to realize that it takes skill in marketing the fruit, as well as growing it, and have kept, the markets in good shape throughout the season. As a consequenc...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1905

12 THE FIELD The Grasses to Grow. (By ii. L. Blanohard.) Three important things to be con sidered in the .annual round of plant ing the farm are climatic and sol conditions, the proper rotation of crops, and the market demands. The same locality, even adjoining farms, may be successful under a system of cropping following diverging lines. That is to say, if the plan is to mar ket the products directly, a system of planting should be followed, quite in contrast with that system under the plan of first feeding the crops to the animals and then marketing the ani mal products. Each of such lines of farming has its true system, w'.iich should be followed. The mix'ng of the two systems la not often advis able. So when the question arises with us as to what grasses to grow we should keep in mind the adopted system. The growing of the grasses and grains for direct marketing no doubt represents the easiest and «implet Kind of farming, and under certa'n conditions is probably the most profita...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1905

when the orchard has had a reason able amount of care given to its for mation, and this Ughi pruning given in early summer seems to be good treatment tor unproductive trees. Importance of Tile Drainage. Do you realise the Importance ol draining your bog lands? Many a good farm is almost non-productive because if contains so much land that cannot he worked and put into profitable coirs on account of being too wet. The so lution of the question lies in drainage; yet how few, comparatively Bpeaking, take up the question and apply ill" remedy! They will sny the expense is too great. Were they to sit down and carefully figure out how much of re turns they could get. from the land If it were drained they would have their eyes opened. But, as a rule, most owners of such lands see only tin 1 "first cost of the drainage, forgetting that nothing profitable can be gotten from a piece of ground unless some WITHOUT IRRIGATION ON CASCADE ORCHARDS. expense be first incurred to put it in proper con...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1905

14 LIVE STOCK Weak Ankles in Colt. Editor The Ranch:—l have a colt two months old, that has weak ankles in front, caused by straining them in delivering him at birth. It causes him to knuckle over and occasionally fall. Will you please give me your Ideas of how to treat them to give them strength? At present he is run ning in a hill pasture with his mother. —W. O. M. Reply by S. B. Nelson, professor of veterinary science at State College. — The weakness of the ankles is without question due to the weakness of the extensor or front muscles of the feet. These are the muscles above the knees. I would suggest a stimulating liniment, such as compound soap lini ment, to be applied to the muscles, with 'considerable friction, morning and evening. It may also be due to shortening of the flexor muscle's—the muscles imme diately behind. If this is the case the treatment given you will have no value. The treatment then is to cut the flexor tendons. You will have to have a veterinarien do this ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1905

parts oil), and apply to the parts af fected twice a day for a few days, which w'll cure it in the first stage without leaving any trace of the dis ease, but of course after the cankers form they are likely to leave the mouth irregular or out of snape. But if you will apply the above preparation to the sow's udder before the pigs suck they will not have sore mouths. If a sow has raised sore mouthed pigs, she is likely to raise another litter of the same kfnd unless something is done about it. "Scouring is another drawback in raising: pigs, which causes a great deal of trouble and loss. It-IS a complaint that will knock a ?ood pig out and make a scrub or a corpse of him about as quick as anything we know of. It is, however, a trouble that we have always found easily handled. For th's trouble we confine the sow with her litter in a small and comfortable place, with a fresh, dry bed and plenty of it. We take off most of the feed from the sow and give her from ten drops to two-thirds of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1905

1(1 THERE IS SAFETY IN USING THE TUBULAR _^^^^^^ ■ . A PRIEND OF OURS, who had a Separator with a large semi-protected exposed / .. .vffijpljjl^'«v --Ai ■ *''?'*&& /V -(>;l11 wheel, experienced a close call the other day. He had the machine up ; I . s&2iri JSM~mSk Ifafc*' 'X « to pretty good speed, when lie remembered that it, was running withoul oil, • ■ Mfifl 'ißß®^^'"^l ami lei <.>;<> of the crank, and without giving a second thought to it seized the gear '■ S^P^S^^R^^S^JSfP?^' \\s wild 1! to try to stop the bowl, not realizing that if If held his hand on to the gear-. \®^S§^S^^HBl ' >. J- " HauNt? i"i! a second or two longer, it would encounter that point in the circumference of ■^IjS^^SS^^^^^- the wheel where it passed quite close to the bottom of the howl casing, lie,ore he ■ -■^Sj^^^»lS§»^S^lfi could disengage his hand it was caught and came out with the loss of a linger nail ■^'^^Sp.l -"F: illl<l a grent deal of flesh. The finger was practica...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

THE RANCH . VOL. XXII. NO. 18. Co-Operation Applied in Various Ways RAILROADS AND DRAINAGE, SUNNYSIDE lies in the heart of the Yakima valley, Washing ton. This is the largest irri gated section in the northwest and seems to promise more for future ir rigation than any proposition now un der consideration by the federal gov ernment. The great progress that has marked the Sunnyside country is due to two causes: First, the most fav ored natural conditions—deep, rich soil, fine climate and abundance of pure water, and second, a wide-awake, progressive people, with financial abil ity, have been attracted to the favored valley. But the key note to real prosperity the one word that has set Sunnyside ahead of other places of this class, is cooperation. The most potent factor is the church federation. This is a cor poration. It joins six of thei leading denominations into one organization. This organization has for its object the unifying of ef forts to advance the moral and religious intere...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

• ) Angora Goat Industry in Pacific Northwest H. H. WILLIAMSON. Editor Oregon Agriculturist THE Angora goal Industry wm in augurated in the Pacific north west by the bringing of a small Mock to Benton county, Oregon, about 1870, purchased from Butterlleld &■ Bon, of California. Within the follow ing two or Hire- yean Wm. M. Land rum then of California, brought to Oregon and sold In this stair In the neighborhood of 2,000 Angora goats. mostly three-fourths or seven-eighths Angora. Since that time, until quite recently, comparatively few Angora goatfl have been brought into the northwest, except choice stock for breeding purposes. There has been no grading up from the common Mex lean goat in the northwest, but on the other hand, a large number of well bred Angoras have been bought from lohn S. Harris. C. P. Bailey, Wm. M. Landrum and other leading breeders for the purpose of improving the qual ity of the goats here. Fortunately, also Oregon has developed a number of the most skill...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

EXPERIENCES All subscribers are invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either in subscription or advertising. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. Hurdle for Driving Hogs.—ln driving hogs from one lot to another, or when loading them in a wagon, a hurdle made of a few Ix 3 inch slats will take the place of two or three men. It should be made light, so that it will be easily carried, and should not be over 4 or 5 feet long; 30 inches will be high enough. I generally handle all of my hogs alone. An old boar is lia ble to get cross, and a hurdle will pre vent him from striking you. You can walk close to a hog if you hold the hurdle in front of you.—W. P. Doo little. To Mend Rubber Shoes.—When rub ber overshoes are but little worn it often happens that breaks come on the sides, causing them to leak. I mend these places by taking a piece of denim or other strong cloth and having some good glue ready; spread upon the cloth while w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

4 THE MOTTLING OF BUTTER. THE GENERAL teaching of today about the mottling of butter is well summarized by Mr. H. Hay ward in circular 56 of the department of agriculture, bureau of animal in dustry, entitled "Facts concerning the history, commerce, and manufac ture of butter:" and we quote from this circular: "One of the serious de fectl often found in butter is lack of uniformity of color, or what is com monly know nas 'mottles.' This de feet is seen in white streaks, spots or blotches, which are most pronounced when a lump of butter ia cut so as to show a broad, smooth surface. If this cut surface is held at a proper angle to the light, any lack of uniform ity ?n color will be plainly noticed. So serious is this defect considered that butter otherwise perfect, but mot tled, is graded as second class in the large markets. The causes to which this fault can be attributed are, first, particles of curd, differing in size, incorporated in the butter, and second, an uneven distribution...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

THE RANCH Office: 376 Col man Building, Seattle. MILLER FREEMAIf. Editor and Proprietor Associate mditors F WALDEN, H. L. BLANCHARD MRS. S. Q. WEBSTER. Wued the rir»t tnd rift—nth of Mon"tt Subscription, in advance, one year 50 ,-ents six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1.00 per year on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to so licit subscriptions. Good commissions ■Vnd salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writing, by letter or postal card when a subscriber wishes his paper Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list shown on your paper by address label C° F ta ai i Hn g gto y°r Ue rce nivrthe paper f regular ly you Should notify the Seattle office it once, when mistakes, if any. will be C°The teßanch is entered at the Seattle postofflce at second-class rates of ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

li HORTICULTURAL NOTES IN THIS department will be found a valuable article entitled "The Seedless Apple Fraud" frQm that veteran in horticulture, H.. E. Van Demon, Of Washington. D. C. It is well known to most readers of The Ranch that there is no higher authori ty on the American continent in mat ters pertaining to horticulture than the writer of this article. He is the judge of fruits at the Lewis and Clark fair and filled the same position at the Pan-American fair at Buffalo four years ago. It is very evident that only men of the very highest stand ing in their departments are called to fill such positions and especially for the second time. It is the privilege of the writer to meet Prof. Van Deman daily during the progress of the Port land fair. The Ranch feels honored to have the privilege of publishing this article The horticultural editor will keep the original manuscript as a valuable souvenir of the Lewis and Clark Centennial fair. * * * Some one may want to ask why it shou...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

son may profitably raise fruit where occasionally the frost takes the crop, but if his orchard is on ■ broad stretch of level land it may prove to be an un profitable business. The question of elevation is not so much as to how high the location is above sea level as it is how much it is above the Imme diate surroundings. Elevated points are far better than broad stretches of elevated land. Peaches, a pricots and nectarines are much more easily killed by frost at blooming time than apples pears and cherries. Hence, the lesson is to put your peaches, apricots and nectarines on your highest ground. Re member that the low -valleys and flat stretches are colder in the winter time and also at blooming time than the higher lands near by. So il is advisable to avoid these low places for all kinds of tree fruits. Put the low lands, if you have any, into grass for pasture and hay. This matter of clanger from frost on the lower grounds may be much mod ified by the presence of a large body of ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

9 EXPOSITION CITY ROSES—AND ROSE j& j& PROPAGATION j& j& Mrs. s. G. WEBSTER, Household Editor THE Lewis and Clark Fair at Port land this summer was more than an exhibition of the best offer ings and product! of the various states and countries represented—it was a veritable festival of roses —a festival which occurs every year; but this, by special effort on the part of the grow ers was more pronounced tnan usual. I heard some people on the veranda of the New York building on the fair ground* exclaiming about the masses of La France roses blooming by the thousand! in wide beds spread out be fore them, and one of them said: "I wonder if the people out here realize what they'e got in these roses! They seem to admire them, of course, but they are not half appreciative enough!" Naturally they are nothing extraordinary to the Port landers, so they don't exclaim much, for they are used to whole houses hanging full ol them and rose scented air is about the only kind they br...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

a small fire in the hearth on an even ing when there is just a hint of chill In the air. and perhaps a hurriedly gott(mi up supper of sliced boiled ham and delicately fried eggs with a cup of coffee, made ready by Amanda, on your return from a tiresome trip to town? Dear Amanda always knows on which side of the table to set the lamp, so bright and shining, and then the cloth on the table is so fresh and crisp and the two or three asters in the" plain white glass vase—just the touch of magic to the whole thing! \nd then how Amanda does enjoy opening the parcels, with "Dear me! and "How did you happen to think or that David?" and other expressions of joy' Fancy having one or two of the latest books, and a fashion maga zine, and a pretty covered basket for thread added as 'surprises' to the list written out by Amanda of the things you had to buy in town. Winter never nuts on furs for us nor threatens to make life wretched for us, with freez ing our noses or frost biting our ears —and w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

10 AMONG CHEESE MAKERS OF HOLLAND E. E. ELLIOTT, Dean of Agriculture, StaU College WHBN ONH speaks of oheeae it is an easy mental step to Ihink of Holland. You can understand liow natural it was when opportunity offered thnt an agricultur ist while on a European trip, should instinctively turn his steps in the di rection of that famous country and find there some of the most interest ing tilings of his entire travels. It is ;» matter ol regret that such trips must always be limited, both as to time and ability to cover ground, mit if there is any country where one can come as near covering all that is to be seen it is this little land of marsh and dyke, open sea and sluggish canals, tulip bods and black and white cattle. Our stay there was necessarily lim itod but so planned that we were able to spend considerable time in some of the richest agricultural districts and study at first hand the methods followed by the farmers and trades men, particularly those connected with the all ab...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

and before one was aware the Cheewe was changing hands and was rapidly being passed under the weigfcmaster'fl Inspection. A few slow traders were holding out for higher prices but the hulk of the sales were made within I half hour and the carts soon distrib uted the golden cannon balls to the waiting barges on the canal banks. By three in the afternoon the town was practically deserted and turned over to the street cleaners. The Dutch are born traders and they certainly got as much enjoyment out of their market day as an American would have done out of the Fourth of July. The cheese thus sold finds its way to the warehouses as previously describ ed, and after proper curing and handl ing is distributed to the world's mar kets. As it leaves the producer's hands it would range from two to four weeks old. The farmers conse quentiy are not compelled to wait long for returns for their labor and the financial burden is carried by the deal ers. From Purmerend we went by steam tram farther i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

IS Ito Cream Separator on the Farm IHAVFi been asked to render a short treatise on "The Farm Separa tor," and am pleased to contri bute what information and suggestions 1 can, bearing in mind that to many of you who are using separators and using them intelligently, my advice is perhaps superiluous. It is not to such tnat 1 am addressing myself, but more particularly to thoae contemplating the purchase of a cream separator, and to those who are already using one, but are not living up to the require ments that the buyers of their cream would insist on, if they but knew that they had you where you could not take your cream elsewhere. What kind of a separator to buy is the lirst rock in the channel to steer clear of, and many founder on it. It is on this that many need advice, and in wetting forth my views, I will en deavor to be as impartial as possible. First of all, convince yourself by means of your eyes, and reasoning powers tnat the machine you select is the result of your best ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

44i^Vl_II Self Feed rZjNSILAQE iJOIvJ Blower Cr CUTTERS "Ohio" self-feeding ensilage CUTTER AH Will cut more feed and elevate it into the silo with a given with Direct-Blast Blower Elevator. fljEsgi amount of power than any other Ensilage Cutters made. Made in 3 siz.-s with 13, 16 and 18-inch knives. This has been demonstrated so often thai it is now admitted JH^k ■■■ ' :.]* thai llu 1 "Ohios" excel in Ihe essentials of maximum capac %j' itv with the minimum of power. i^^ Q | ' UII tU "* _^—-^=s^ss-— —wen __-^K*X£?^':j^K?3 fc*^^* 3K? The Self-Feed on the "Ohio" increases the capacity JP .iSWBWP^Kir^ 33Ys per cent and saves 66% per cent of the labor re- most efficient distributor made, saves the expense of one or more men in q^q stan^arS^STa^ ensilage cutter. the silo when Cutting. • Showing New Straightaway Metal Bucket Carrier. More Money Can Be Made out of Milk Cows and Beef Cattle by Feeding: Silage than by Any Other Means On silage ration, milk costs 68% c per 100 lbs. tr rrrsrt...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1905

14 get it always to run at its best. Do not be afraid to go alter your agent, or if necessary your state agent If tiny art> reliable they will be desirous of having your trouble straightened out. Use only the best of oil. That rec ommended or put out by the state agent should be all right, as they would naturally desire to have their ma chines properly lubricated. Any old mixture can be called "separator oil," but it may be chiefly coal-oil, which has no lubricating life and it may be doped with fish oil, which would be worse, as this will gum on to the parts, and cause them to clog up the parts, heat and perhaps weld them. Always clean out the gearing and parts every month or so with kerosene oil, pour some through the gearing while it revolves, and it will clean it all out in first class shape. Your ma chine will run better for it, and will last longer. Be sure and give the crank the re quired number of revolutions per min ute; use a watch until you are used to it. If you fail ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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