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Title: Wytheville Dispatch Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 351 items from Wytheville Dispatch, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 30 December 1863

WYTIIEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIII, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 f0r six months, 51.50 for three inonths, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One square{ 10 linen) or less, one insertion, SI,OO. Each additional, 50 rents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or yuarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will be inserted for $5.00 in advance. Voiceless Verse. The world is rife with nobler thought Than trembles on the tongue; The world is full of melody, Unwritten and unsung, The music of a march is sweet, But action is sublime, And you may live a nobler verse Than can be told in rhyme! Let lyres and lutes, with tinkling breath, To love-sick girls belong; The rhythm of a well-spent life Is sweeter far than song. I'm weary of the waste of words— Our world were not so dead If half otir bards would cease to write And live their songs instead! Tliere Is a Future. Aud in that future wo sha...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 30 December 1863

can escape by making contributions apparently large, but in comparison with their gains, paltry, to relieve the distresses on which they fatten? It is attempting to bribe God for permission to serve Mammon. The time is coming when those who have gdt rich by extortion and speculating on the woes of their country,' will be glad to get rid of all their gains for the privilege of holding up their hands and saying, "These hands are clean." WYTHBVILLE DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30, 18G3 JVew Year's Day. The first day af January, 1864, is now at hand. With the cloae of to-morrow the old year will pass away, and the new year begin to run its course of mingled joy and sorrow. Though the existing divisions of the year, as observed among the civilized nations of the West, is wholly arbitrary, and founded on no natural division of the seasons, and though we are not warranted, therefore, by any natural law, in regarding any one day of the year above another, as marking the close of the revolution...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 30 December 1863

Counting House. CALENDAR. I .<&H | &M >1 >J | rffi >; >j % Q!>; « CCD |>j 5 s 2 2 ***** i \< ! d£je 5 « !-< 2«£ 2 < c©ig:§ s | § ! s gl »glsa ga g| U 1 p l ® P£W j « < *—■« !p '3 I pjs M « < ' |!OQ H H «2 |{DQ SjH H&4OQ f ]: i i : ' __ 1 JAN. 1 2 JULY. | | 12! 3456789 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 101112 13 14 15 16! 1 10 1112 13|14 15 16, 17 18 19 20 21122 23 ,17 18 19 20 21 22 23 .24 25 26 27 28 29 30 « 24 25 26 27 28 29 30; 31 I | 31 - I FEB. | '1 234 5 6 AUG. i 1: 234 5 6 71 8 910 111213 j 7 8: 910 1112 13 {14115 16 17 18 19 20 14 1510 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 ; i21|22 23 24 25 26 27| 2829 I 128 29 30 31 MAR. i 123 4 5 SEPT. j 1 I 12 3 6 7 8 9 lOjll 12 : 4| 5 6 1 7 8 910 13 1415 16 17 18119 1112 13 14 15 16 171 20 21122 23 24 25 26! 18 19 20 21 22 23 24: 27 28 29 30 31 j 25 26 27128 29 30 i APR. | 1 2 1! 3 4 56 7 8 9 OCT....

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 30 December 1863

Excuses for not going to Cliurch. Over slept myself; could not dress in time; too cold; too hot; too windy; too dusty; too wet; too damp; too sunny; too cloudy; don't feel disposed; no other time to myself; look over my drawers; put my papers to rights; letters to write to my friends; mean to take a walk; going to take « ride; tied to buisness six days in the week; no fresh air but on Sundays; cant breathe in church, always so full; feel a little feverish; feel a little chilly; feel very lazy; expect company to dinner; got a headache; intend nursing myself to-day; new bonnet not come home; torn my muslin dress coming down stairs; got a new novel, must be returned on Monday morning; wasn't shaved in time; ■don't like a liturgy, always praying for the same thing; don't fike extemporary prayer; don't like an organ, 'tis too noisy; don't like singing without music, makes me nervous, —the spirit willing, but the flesh weak; dislike an extemporary sermon, it is wo frothy; cant bear a writ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 6 January 1864

WITIIKVILLI: DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WKEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 for six months, $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One square( 10 lines) or less, one insertion, SI,OO. Each additional ', 50 ■tents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or guarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will Reinserted fors s.oo in advance. From the Illustrated News. Early Days. BY CAMERON BISQUB. Have you forgot the early days, When, swinging on the gate, I waited for my little queen— Her copy-book and slate? Have you forgot the sunny hours, The castles in the air, When you set flowers in my heart, I wreathed them in your hair? How strange that lazy seemed tho hours Along our journey then— That girls would hasten on the years, And boys leaped to be men? And yet how gladly would we live Our youth of long ago, For years fly on as swiftly now As song-birds from the snow! Well, then,...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 6 January 1864

WYTHBYILLB DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13, 1863. The Malls and tlie Weather. We have had no mails from Wythcville this year, in consequence of the frozen condition of New River, which renders crossing impracticable. Consequently we have to follow the example of that worthy old lady who gave as an excuse for not taking a newspaper, that she always made her own news. We hope this will not be objected to by our readers, as it is a habit very much iin vogue about this time. We have not seen the "oldest inhabitant" to enquire whether or not he ever experienced colder weather, but our "devil" is satisfied it is the coldest that ever came along, and if it lasts much longer he will send up an application for leave of absence for ninety days to visit a warmer clime. We are not prepared to say exactly how cold it is, as we have to keep our thermometer in the house to keep it from freezing, knowing if we lost it we might have difficulty in getting another through the blockade The News. . In abse...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 6 January 1864

The First and Second Revolutions Compared. Whether we compare the amount of life sacrificed in proportion to the number engaged, or the amount of treasure expended in the first and #econd American Revolutions, the balance remains with the latter. Up to the time the colonics declared themselves independent of England there has been no correct census ever made of their population; yet it was estimated that the number of people in them, white and black, was between three and four million. The war from the first sjhedding of blood to its close, continued seven years. The whole number of men enlisted into the then "rebel armies," first and last amounted to about "200,000; but at no time was there aver over 35,000; of all arms in the Held. The colonics lying south of ♦he Potomac furnished a fraction over two-thirds of the whole number of men engaged in that struggle, and during the whole period not a single regiment from the North side of that river was on Southern soil. The South both fu...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 6 January 1864

From the Illustrated News. Those Lovely Feet. I saw her from my wiftdow Go tripping down the street; Her form was most superb, but, ah! Who ever saw such feet? I heard them patter, patter go, Soft as an angel's tread ; "SJ small," said I, " I never saw Before, or even read." I seized my hat and followed The unsuspecting "fair," And watched the lightly tripping feet, That seemed to tread on air. "Who can she be?" I wondered; "She's beautiful, I know— A fairer woman never trod This earth of ours below. She stopped—she dropped her 'kerchief (I am always quite gallant); I picked it up with prettiest bow, And, thunder! 'twas my aunt! WHAT HE THOUGHT. —An Ohio stump speaker, while making a speech, paused in the midst of it and exclaimed; "Now, gentlemen what do you think?" Instantly a man arose in the assembly, and with one eye partially closed, modestly, with strong Scotch brogue, replied: "I think, sir, I do indeed, sir—l think if you and I were to stump the country together, we would t...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 20 January 1864

WITIIEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to sub'teribers at $2.50 for six months, $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 cis. ADVERTISING. One square( 10 lines) or less, one insertion, SI,OO. Each additional, 50 lents. Liberal deduction made to yearly or Quarterly advertisers. Announcements of Candidates will ke inserted /or $5.00 in advance. Tbe Private Soldier. Under this head the Jackson (Mississippi) Crisis pays the following handsome tribute to the private soldier: Justice has never been done him. His virtuous merit and unobstructed patriotism have never been justly estimated. We do not speak of the regular soldier, who makes the army his trade for twelve dollars per month. We do not include the coward, who skulks, nor his vulgarians, who can perpetrate acts of meanness, nor for the laggard, who must be forced to fight for hi» home and country. These are not the subjects of our c...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 20 January 1864

WYTHEVIJJLB DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20, 1863. Take Care of the Soldiers. The hope of the Confederacy rests in its soldiery, and it behooves us who are from any cause exempt from active military duty to take care of our soldiers in the field. Especially now when the wintry winds aro whistling, and the breath til' the Ice king is locking up the water courses, and causing the big logs to be piled on, and the oavercoats and shawls to be drawn closely around us. While w# are enjoying the luxury of a warm bed, the faithful sentinel is walking his lonely beat in sight of the enemy, it may be, and in many cases, but poorly clad. Can you divine his thoughts? lie does not murmur at the hardship which lie is undergoing but is thinking of the days of his childhood, of home, Mitd friends, and his prayer is that you may bo protected from the hands the despoiler. Ho expects kindness from you in return and has a righs to expect it. Don't forget him! ! f',y<iur own dear ones are so situ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 20 January 1864

Anti-Substitute Law. It is expected that General Orders will be prepared in the Adjutant General's office, in a few days, lor the immediate conscription of parties who have furnished substitutes, and have recently been subjected by Congress to military service. On this subject it appears that popular statistics have proved to be, what they most invariably are, gross exagerations, which are wonderfully reduced by severe official estimates. The estimates prepared in the Bureau of Conscription of the number of parties furnishing substitutes in the four great States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, are from twenty to twenty five thousand, of whom ten thousand are conjectured to have fraudulent papers, thus leaving but ten to fifteen thousand persons as the real military acquisition made by the late violent and distressing law of Congress. These figures prompt the enquirv, whether the practical fruits of the law will not he in great disproportion to the distrust ...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 20 January 1864

Dost thou like tbe picture? Charles Augustus Flingflumery, having been thrown into the society of what he deemed a very sentimental and romantic young lady, and in their walk had wandered to the romantic suburbs of A., where he thought a tine opportunity presented itselt to express his undying devotion, and at the same time give utterance to his vocal powers. lie drew her gently to his manly breast, and throwing himself into position, said: "Nay, dearest, nay, if thou wouldst have me paint the home to which, could Love fulfil its prayers, this hand would lead the, listen! A deep vale shut out by Alpine hills from the rude world, near a clear lake margined by fruits of gold and whispering myrtles; glassing softest skies as cloudless, save with rare and roseate shadows, as I would have thy fate! A place lifting to eternal summer its marble walls, from out a glossy bower of coolest foliage musical with birds, whose songs should syllable thy name! At noon we sit beneath the arching vine...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 27 January 1864

WYTIIEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. PUBLISHED SKMI-WEEK.I.Y. D. A. ST. CLAM, Proprietor. TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 for six months, $1.50 far three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One sqna.re{ 10 lines) or less, each insertion, SI,OO. Liberal deduction made to yearly or quarterly advertisers Announcements of Candidates will be insertedfor $5.00 in advance. A ThLillin? Revolutionary Tale. God is everywhere. Ilis words are in the heart, tie is on the battle-field, or in our peaceful homes. Praise to his holy name. It was in the wilds of Wissahicon, on the day of the battle, as the noonday sun came through the thick clustered leaves, two men met in deadly conflict near the reef which rose, like some primevial world, at least a thousand feet above the dark waters of the Wissahicon. The man with dark brown face, and dark gray eye flashing with deadly light, and a muscular form, clad in a blue frock of the Revolution, is a Contine...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 27 January 1864

WYTHEVILLB DISPATCH. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 1863. What Then! Suppose we are subjugated what then ? Farms cut up into patches and sold to free negroes and foreignera; Gentlemen and ladies turned out of house and home to give place to miserable hirelings? The shame might be borne with Home degree of fortitude, if we knew our conquerors to be of nobler blood than ourselves, but let it be remembered that if conquered at all, it will be by a more numerous not by a superior race. The miserable Yankee whose God is fanaticism, would then take the place of those whose character for high tone, and liberal feeling is proverbial. The witchhurning of New England would ere long be reenacted and persecution such as the world never saw would l>e visited upon all who prefered worshiping the God of the Bible to the worship of fanaticism! Does any one doubt this? Let him look :it the past history of the Northern people, and he will see at a glance, rhat from ism they have gone on to ism, until...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 27 January 1864

End of the War—Lyons Endorsing Seward. Lord Lyons in a despatch to Lord Russell, from Washington, announces that the war in America will bo terminated within the next three months. This is very gratifying.— But Lyons adds, "the Confederates being in the greatest extremities will have speedily to propose an armistice." This puts another face on the matter. We here at the "Rebel" Capital are not prepared to be used up at so short a notice. For politeness' sake, Lord Lyons ought to have made his announcement three montht ago. Ninety days is a short time for a people who beve whipped the Yankees in nearly every general engagement, to settle up their accounts. Why, a regimental quartermaster could not settle up his accounts in less than half a year. Alluding to Lyons' reported despatch, the London Globe says drily: "We recommend our readers to receive such statements with reserve, and not too hastily to assume Lord Lyons' readiness to accept the 90 days' bills so often renewed at a heavy...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 27 January 1864

Camp Incident. Captain •, of the 26th Georgia, succeeded in running the blockade and getting a bottle of the "genuine tangle leg," and returning with it to camp, concealed under his coat, slipped into his tent and deposited the bottle behind the messchest, and congratulated himself upon his adroitness in concealing the article from his friends—who, had they discovered it, would in a short time have left it empty. Now, behind this ssune mess-chest there sat a quart bottle of ink, of the is:: me size and dimensions as the whisky bottle; and when the Captain placed his bottle behind the chest he did not elude the sharp scent and quick eye of one of his triends, who watched him. R kept his own counsel till after dark, and while the Captain was at supper touched G on the shoulder and said: "The Captain has a bottle of whiskey behind the chest; let us take a sockdologer while he is at supper." "Good," was the reply, and they proceeded into the tent* took seat's on the chest, reached behin...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 5 February 1864

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. VOL. 111. WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. P.UIILISIIED SElfl-WEEKLY. D. A. ST. CLAIR, Proprietor, TERMS. The Dispatch is furnished to subscribers at $2.50 for six months, $1.50 for three months, single copies, 10 cts. ADVERTISING. One squure( 10 lines) or less, each insertion, SI,OO. Liberal deduction made to yearly or quarterly advertisers Announcements of Candidates will bt inserted for $5.00 in advance. Elenore. The grave hath won thee Elenore 1 Heaven hath an angel more Sunken into rosy rest, Clasping violets to her brcst. Thou hast gained a holier clime; I still roam the vales of time; Thou art only gone before— I will follow, Elenore! Ah! I would not, would not weep, Could I share thy lowly sleep; Could I in the shadow-vale Press thy lips, so mute and pale; Yet, ah! why these idle tears? All my sad soul's hopes and fears Cannot call thee to me more From thy star-home, Elenore! Hark! upon the spirit-breeze, Fainting through the lilac-trees, Hear I not her angel sighs,...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 5 February 1864

WYTHEVILLE DISPATCH. Mil DAY, :::::: FEB. 5, 1863 How to end tlie War. When the war commenced it was predicted that it would be of short duration,but contrary to all expectation it has lasted nearly three years, and to all appearances the end is not near. Much of the South has been desolated and many of her noble sons have surrendered their lives in defence of the right. It appears mysterious that such a calamity should be visited upon a people who have never asked anything but simple justice at the hands of those who now oppress them, and who were willing to surrender much that rightfully belonged to them for the poor boon of being let alone. Looking at the matter from a mere human point of view, it is full of mystery, but when we remember that God's ways are not man's, we begin to see in the sins of our people a cause for the prolonging of the curse. We were a better people at the commencement of the war than now, and hence our sucesses, as we verily beleive. We relied upon our Go...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 5 February 1864

Running the Blockade at Wilmington. A semi official statement relative to runniug tlie blockade at Wilmington N. C., shows that from January, 1863, to the 23d of October in tlhe same year—ten months—ninety vessels ran into Wilmington. During last August one ran in every other day, making fifteen in that month. In onetlay, the llth of July, four ran in, and on the 19th of October last five came safely through the blockaders. At Charleston, during the six months ending in July, 1803, forty-three steamers ran in safely, These facts have been made public in Europe, though it is not at all likely that they will open the eyes of those who are determined not to see. WENDELL PHILLIPS, confessedly the most eloquent of English orators, says that "after the armies of the South are forced to retreat to the Gulf for self preservation, the war wilt still go on. All wars are ended by compromise, and the present civil v\iir in this country must end in the same manner." We believe part of this, that...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Wytheville dispatch — 5 February 1864

"Growing Old." BAD changes on time's bells Are slowly, sadly tolled; Sweet voices on the air Soft whisper, growing old; And viewless spirits seem to say, We're growing old, passing away, The sunbeam's silvery pale Chill nestle in the hair, And dusky .pinions sweep Across tho "brow so fair; And shadows rest so dim and cold Within the eye when growing old. Earth's thousand thrilling tones The same words mournful breathe, While age so feebly waits Our weary brows to wreathe; But there's a thought of bliss untold, A loving heart can ne'er grow old. EFFECT or Lwnr— A tadpole conlined in darkness would never become ft frog; and an infant deprived of Heaven's free light would only urow into a shapeless idiot, instead of a beautiful and reasonable being. Hence, in the deep, dark gorges and ravines of the Swiss Yalois, whore the direct sunshine never reaches, the hideous prevalence of idiocy startles the traveler. It is a strange melancholy idiocy. Many citizens are' incapable of any articul...

Publication Title: Wytheville Dispatch
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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